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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having seen occasional mentions in other threads discussing suggestions not to fire in double tap fashion, I am wondering:
1. Has anyone tried this with the XDM9?
2. What have been the issues in double tapping with other models?
3. Any general feedback on this methodology which I was taught to use for defensive purposes when originally trained to use handguns several years ago?

Happy holidays to all!
 

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I'm a firm believer that you should not fire double taps (one sight picture two pulls of the trigger) because you can aim both shots just as fast AND you know where the shots are going.

As far as the gun not being able to handle multiple shots in fast succession, that is just BS.
 

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Lets clarify things a bit. Are you referring to firing the second shot as rapidly as the pistol will cycle without aiming at all? If so, depending on the individuals recoil control, that can result in that second shot ranging from on target to a complete and total miss. Misses are BAD, especially sky shot misses, because you have no idea where they will come down.

Now, during my CPL class the instructor took the time to teach me a new, for me, method of using sights. It's called Point, or Target Focused Shooting and is as follows.

1) Pick a spot on your attacker and focus on that spot.

2) Imagine a line drawn between your dominant eye and that spot on your attacker.

3) As soon as both front & rear sights hit that imaginary line you smoothly pull the trigger.

4) Control your recoil.

5) After recoil, as soon as the sights hit that imaginary line, pull the trigger again, smoothly but rapidly.

With good recoil control, and practice, that followup shot can occur in about 1/3 second. This method does require practice and it is not as accurate as slow, sight focused, aimed fire. However, it is good enough for defensive shooting and defensive ranges. I was hitting solid 9 ring hits at 20 feet on a B-27R. What was even more surprizing is how close the followup hits were to the first shot, at least 70% of the time I was shooting figure 8 groupings. I think that is because of a muscle memory effect. So, if that is what you are calling Double Taps, there is no problem with doing this and I believe that it's the most effective method to employ for a Defensive Shooting situation.

BTW, I have been practicing and am now hitting solid 10 ring hits at 20 ft. about 80% of the time. However, when I shift my vision for the head shot in a FTP drill I find that I am shooting left. So, more practice is needed for when I shift my target point. As it is now, there would be way too many winning BG's walking around missing an ear. My plan is to sticker a target with small shoot-n-sees and practice walking the stickers as rapidly as possible. Once I master that drill, i'll go back to shooting failure drills.

As for Double Taps being bad for the pistol, as long as you don't over heat the gun there really shouldn't be any problem.
 

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If you really want a speed drill, get yourself a steel target. I've got a 12 inch diameter disk. Mount it so there is a slight lean-the top edge closer to you than the bottom. Start at a safe distance of 10-11 yards and fire every time you align the sights. When you get a boring number of hits, back-up to a longer distance. Even better, paint the target some bright color. When you wear a nicely tight pattern in the paint, repaint and back up.
 

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Scooter is right on the money. I just went to a class this AM and we were learning how to properly double tap. I shoot the XDM9 and it did just fine. I was hitting my mark on first shot and by the end of the class the second shot was within 4 inches of the first consistently.

This was my first time double tapping but I am confident that with practice and improving muscle memory I could safely use the double tap should the situation call for it.


Lets clarify things a bit. Are you referring to firing the second shot as rapidly as the pistol will cycle without aiming at all? If so, depending on the individuals recoil control, that can result in that second shot ranging from on target to a complete and total miss. Misses are BAD, especially sky shot misses, because you have no idea where they will come down.

Now, during my CPL class the instructor took the time to teach me a new, for me, method of using sights. It's called Point, or Target Focused Shooting and is as follows.

1) Pick a spot on your attacker and focus on that spot.

2) Imagine a line drawn between your dominant eye and that spot on your attacker.

3) As soon as both front & rear sights hit that imaginary line you smoothly pull the trigger.

4) Control your recoil.

5) After recoil, as soon as the sights hit that imaginary line, pull the trigger again, smoothly but rapidly.

With good recoil control, and practice, that followup shot can occur in about 1/3 second. This method does require practice and it is not as accurate as slow, sight focused, aimed fire. However, it is good enough for defensive shooting and defensive ranges. I was hitting solid 9 ring hits at 20 feet on a B-27R. What was even more surprizing is how close the followup hits were to the first shot, at least 70% of the time I was shooting figure 8 groupings. I think that is because of a muscle memory effect. So, if that is what you are calling Double Taps, there is no problem with doing this and I believe that it's the most effective method to employ for a Defensive Shooting situation.

BTW, I have been practicing and am now hitting solid 10 ring hits at 20 ft. about 80% of the time. However, when I shift my vision for the head shot in a FTP drill I find that I am shooting left. So, more practice is needed for when I shift my target point. As it is now, there would be way too many winning BG's walking around missing an ear. My plan is to sticker a target with small shoot-n-sees and practice walking the stickers as rapidly as possible. Once I master that drill, i'll go back to shooting failure drills.

As for Double Taps being bad for the pistol, as long as you don't over heat the gun there really shouldn't be any problem.
 

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scooter, great drill, but that's really not a double tap because you getting a sight picture for the second shot. Loves2shoot explained the double tap and that's really not what you are doing, and that's good. If you ever get to watch a pro, it looks like a double tap, but they are calling the shot at .09 seconds between shots. You can tell if you watch some of the youtube videos. As the targets get further out the time between shots slows down, not much, but it is noticeable. The hits will be all "A"'s. They are getting the sight picture they need to make the shot that fast each and every time.

Keep up the good work, you'll get faster, and be very surprised some day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was firstly concerned that there might have been some mechanical/engineering issue that I was as of yet unaware of. Now, with that issue put to rest, the discussion of both technique and drills is highly educational - and VERY much appreciated.

By the way - pictures of the new XDM9 - just picked up today (looong ride out and back with the puppies in the back,) will be posted in a few hours after cleaning them up!

Happy Holidays All!!!
 

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There are double taps and then there are hammers, don't know which one you're referring to.

The issue with double taps? None. The speed of which you conduct a double tap is directly related to the speed in which you acquire both sight pictures. The faster you can acquire your 2nd sight picture, the faster your double taps will be.

The issue with hammers? It's a safety issue. Two rapid shots with 1 sight picture is a poor technique to utilize the farther away your target is. By not acquiring the 2nd sight picture after your first shot, your shot may or may not be on target (usually dependent on your proximity to your target).


As for issues doing double taps or hammers with any weapon? Shouldn't be a problem as long as you take care of it (lube, clean, replacing worn parts as needed).

P.S. So many terms which one to use? "Controlled pair," "double tap," and "hammers."
All 3 terms have been used interchangeably but according to my understanding, only two are correct. Controlled pair = double tap.

Hammers are another beast.

But again, so many terminologies, which is right?.

And because you've mentioned defensive purposes - Mozambique drills are often nice to practice and useful.
 

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I must have beaten the living sh!t out of my XDm9 last Tuesday night then. Our tactical class went into a gang scenario with 4 targets in 4 seperate lanes and we had to empty 5 rounds into each target as fast as we could, in the sequence the instructor told us to. Lucky for me I did not have to change mags. We did a tactical mag change in one exercises, where we had to put 5 rounds into a target in the lane you were in, and 5 into the hostage takers head 2 lanes over to your right. Then we had to change mags and repeat in reverse. The last exercise was to take all five targets in the lanes and empty your mag as fast as you can in random targets starting with the closes target. All targets were set up in different yardages and we had to shoot in between targets to hit the target out at the 7 yard marker.

After 200 rounds my trigger finger was tired.

After that the instructor asked to shoot my gun and bump fired 20 rounds through it in about 5 seconds. Fun was had by all.....:D
 
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