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Hi
My 1st post.
I am looking at the XDM for my main pistol, I like the safety features and hi cap. mags.
I am not a big person and have a small hand, one of the things I like is the adj. grip.
I have a full size 9mm, grip is a little large for me but it's no problem to shoot, and I enjoy shooting it, now because the XDM will be smaller, I should be able to grip it much better and am thinking that the 40 might be better choice than the 9mm.
How much more recoil is there from a 40 vs. a 9?
Opinions please.
 

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The .40 typically has a sharp and torquey recoil. I don't like it, nor do I see what the round offers that the 9mm does not. The .40 is a compromise caliber that really does nothing well. It does not have the capacity of a 9mm, nor does it have the mass of a .45. If you want something bigger than the 9mm, step up to a .45acp.

ranburr
 

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Bought a .40 because I have hopes of getting an easy conversion to a 9 in the future. I don't think you can go the other way.
 

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I have both the XDM 9mm and the XDM 40 S&W, and have shot my daughter's XD 45 ACP. Which do I like best?? The 40. I really don't understand the statement that ".40 is a compromise caliber that does nothing well." There are probably more LEO's with 40 caliber service handguns than anything else. I started out with the 9mm and liked it so much, I wanted to get the other XDM gun, which happens to be a 40. The first ten rounds my husband shot with the 40, he put 5 in the bullseye. The 40 has more kick than the 9, but not that much more. There is definitely more kick with the 45, which makes me prefer the 40. Why don't you try to find a shooting range that has guns you can rent to shoot and see if they have the XD or XDM in the 9, 40, and 45 calibers and try them out for yourself. You won't be disappointed with any of them. There is a big difference in the ammo costs of shooting them. 9mm is definitely more affordable, and if that's a big issue, get the 9. BUT if you can try to shoot them all first, you'd be better off trying that.
 

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Buy a XDm 40 and later buy the 9mm conversion barrels with some 9mm mags so you will be able shot either one as desired. You can target practice or shoot tin cans with 9mm to save on ammo cost and you will have the XDm as a 40 for defense.
 

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BUT if you can try to shoot them all first, you'd be better off trying that.

That's the best advice I've seen on this board.
There are too many 9mm/40/45 wars with people spouting stuff like "xxx sucks, my yyy is better!" Good grief. Shoot what you're accurate with and shoot as much as you can afford.
 

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personally, I'm not a fan of the 40 S&W. It's a sharp recoil, high pressure round that takes a while to adjust to and is considerably harder on your pistol's longevity than the venerable old 45. In my humble opinion, a 45 for defense and a 9mm for a target gun would be just about right, so it depends on what you want the gun for. A 45 may not have the capacity of a 9 or a 40, but one good shot with a hollow point you can mix a martini in will certainly do the trick
 

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Get the 9mm. The XDM just seems a perfect size and weight for a 9mm to me. The 40 has a alot more recoil . That being said, once you shoot a 40 alot, you adapt to the recoil ,and learn to shoot it with accuracy. Lighter bullets will produce less recoil in a 40 ; like a 155 gr. jhp. For protection I carry a 357 Sig or 40 +p . Shooting targets and fun shooting a 9mm. Each to his own opinion , as its a matter of what a person feels safe to carry. Every pistol is different due to its design. A small H&K compact will have consideral less recoil in 9mm than a 9mm XDM. Its the spring system. I say go 9 in XDM and 40 in HK .
 

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The 40. I really don't understand the statement that ".40 is a compromise caliber that does nothing well."

There are probably more LEO's with 40 caliber service handguns than anything else.

There is definitely more kick with the 45, which makes me prefer the 40.
The .40 is a compromise caliber. Look into the history of where it came from. The origins are in the 10mm that was a great caliber until down graded by the FBI. There were two camps, one pushing for the hi-cap 9mm and one pushing for the pure size of the .45 caliber. The outcome was a compromise .40, that none of the original testers were happy with.

Who cares what police departments choose. Since when do they know anything about guns or calibers?

Finally, I think just about everyone will disagree with you about the felt recoil of a .40 vs .45.

ranburr
 

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All calibers and all loadings, up to nuclear weapons (which come in all sizes) are a compromise of one kind or another.
You estimate your needs and and resources, then buy accordingly.
I have 5 different kinds of defensive rounds for my 40 XDM, and I change them based on my mood.
Use whatever makes you feel good!!
 

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"Compromise"? What does it offer? Well, for one thing a heavier bullet which translates to a significant better [momentum] penetration/ stopping power. One set of measures[Hatcher indices] yields the following: 45ACP-60.7; 40S&W-59.4; 9mm-39.9.
 

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I get a kick out of this caliber debate. Look at the ballistic energy profiles sometime. 9mm +P, 40 S&W, and 45 ACP all have very similar ballistic energy levels. BTW, Newtons Law concerning an opposite and equal reaction means that if you have 400 ft.lbs. of ballistic energy at the muzzle, your going to have the same net level of energy in the recoil. The only difference will be in how sharp the felt recoil reaction will be. Lighter bullets can come up to speed at a higher rate (acceleration) so IMO a 9mm +P firing a 115 gr. bullet will have the sharpest recoil pulse and the 45 ACP firing a 230 gr. bullet will have the longest recoil pulse. However, what the handgun WEIGHS can have a huge effect of the level of felt recoil. If you want a soft shooting pistol, look for a heavy all stainless pistol like a Sig Sauer Elite, they will be soft shooters no matter what caliber your using.

As for the 40 S&W being a compromize, yes it is. It's a very good and effective compromize. That 10mm round had nearly the energy level to a full power 357 round, not the downrated 357 police loads that are now common. This meant that they were NOT fun to practice with, they hurt.

BTW, I looked it up and Winchesters only current 10mm round has 649 ft. lbs. at the muzzle and the original spec for the 357 magnum approached 700 ft. lbs., which sort of expains why they hurt to shoot and the cops using these calibers didn't do a lot of practicing with them. Doing a bit more cruising reveals that Winchester hottest 40 S&W LE load has 476 ft.lbs., which actually compares pretty well with their hottest +P load for the 45 ACP at 501 ft.lbs. Winchester also offers a 115 gr. 9mm +P that has 455 ft.lbs. which is no slouch in terms of ballistic energy. Basically, all 3 calibers have loadings that will hurt a bit to shoot and offer some pretty serious potential stopping power.

Now, pertaining to the original question. Without doubt the 9mm is easier to practice with and cheaper. Winchester White Box in 9mm 147 gr. only has 320 ft.lbs. at the muzzle. It's also easy to find in stock at almost any Walmart. Next up in ease of shooting is the 45 ACP WWB with only 340 ft.lbs., however it's a bit expensive and Walmart is out of stock on this ammo at least 50% of the times when I have hit Walmart. In addition, with an energy level that low some pistols may require a weaker recoil spring to cycle properly with it. Now, for the 40 S&W ammo, WWB has 412 ft.lbs. of muzzle energy so it will snap more than either 9mm or 45 ACP. It's also nearly as expensive as 45 ACP and when Walmart runs out they take a long time to re-stock. Currently I have run 2 local Walmarts completely out of 40 S&W and have had to resort to buying my ammo at the range, which is at least double the cost of a similar ammo at Walmart. Which means that 40 S&W can be expensive to shoot unless your willing to purchase your ammunition over the net, something I am not real comfortable doing.

Anyhow, I hope this helps a bit in your decision. I chose the 40 S&W because I happen to think that it a very good balance between penetration and wound properties. However it can be a bit snappy to practice with and I have found that shooting 150 rounds in one range session will cause my mild tunnel carpal to flare up a bit, so I now limit my practice to 125 rounds or less. If you have wrist issues like me, the 9mm may be a smarter choice. However, I should note that I have hurt my wrist a lot more just starting my car, when that happens I can be in pain for a week or more. If I shoot too much I just get twinges the next day that tell me to take it easy next time out. Not enough to make me stop shooting the 40 right now but the day may come when I convert to 9mm.

Finally a note about the use of 9mm +P ammo. BTW, I am a Mechanical Engineer and base my opinion on that training, I do not have any training as a gunsmith. In my opinion, because the 9mm +P has an energy profile that matches that of the 40 S&W you should re-tune your pistol for the higher energy profile by using a recoil spring for the 40 S&W. This should reduce the slide velocity back to "normal" levels and avoid beating up the gun with that hotter round. One way you can confirm this is by observing how far the ejected casings are thrown because, from an engineering standpoint, that distance is a pure function of slide velocity.
 

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I have read many articles that compare the 9mm vs. .40 vs. .45 “one shot stop” of these calibers. Most of the articles are all about the same percentage points: 92%, 94% and 95% respectively.

That being said, I have read ten times as many articles that the “one shot stop” is but a myth. Even if those percentage numbers are factual, they are so close it really doesn’t make that much of difference.

I saw a FBI statistic that showed nationally what happens to eleven (11) people that are shot:

  • FIVE will spend a few hours in ER, get bandaged up, maybe a few stitches, sent home.
  • THREE will stay overnight at the hospital.
  • TWO will spend three or more days in the hospital.
  • ONE will die.
And large cities ER’s with state of the art trauma centers are going to do better than the hospitals in BFE. So I would expect, but have no data to back it up, that it will take more than eleven people shot in a big city for somebody who was shot to die.

There is a joke that goes something like this:
Q) “Why are you carrying a pistol? Do you think there is going to be trouble?”
A) “No, if I thought there was going to be any trouble I would have brought my rifle.”
What’s my point of all of the above? Pistols really are not that good of a killing device. But it is the best compromise in what we can afford, carry, and conceal while leading a completely normal life. (Do you really want to kill? And before you answer that on the public interweb, remember, legally all you really want to do is stop them.)

If money is not a concern than it is your own personal preference on which caliber to chose. 9mm is cheaper to shoot, .45 theoretically makes the largest wound channel, and .40 is in the middle somewhere.

In the end; The best caliber for you is the one that you are going to repeatedly train and practice with. That includes drawing from concealment quickly, moving targets, targets behind cover/hostage (your family), shooting from cover, et al.

After you have made your choice get involved in IDPA or another shooting league. It does not have to be a sanctioned league like IDPA. The one I attend is loosely based on IDPA but does not follow it to the letter.

Lastly, while training/practicing with a 9mm and carrying a .40 or .45 is still better than not training/practicing at all, it really is best to train and carry the same caliber and weapon model. We have taken people that shoot/carry 1911/45’s and had them run a simple stage back to back with identical 1911’s shooting 9mm and their stage times have increased substantially. I can only imagine going from a 9mm to .45 would be even worse.

Oh, and if the "one stop shot" still bothers you. Increase your odds. Shoot more than once. Bullets are cheap.

/tg


Disclaimer: I currently shoot/carry a Kimber CDP II 1911 in .45 but am moving to 9mm due to ammo cost, and choose the XD(M).
 

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Tim hit the nail right on the head.

If you want to instantly lose all credibility with me, reference “stopping power” as part of your decision to purchase a pistol.

If you buy into the hype about “stopping power,” get a S&W 500.

Remove “stopping power” from your vocabulary, and replace it with “shot placement.”

Why do I carry 9mm? Because I know that 1, 2, or maybe even more shots are PROBABLY not going to incapacitate someone, no matter what caliber you are shooting. 9mm is cheap to shoot, and I can afford to practice with it a lot more then 40 (and I even reload).

I live in a very rural area, and spend more time in the hills than most. If I’m headed out, I don’t take any caliber pistol for defensive reasons (and I have a few to choose from). I take a rifle. As far as I’m concerned, any pistol in any caliber is a compromise.
 

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Tim hit the nail right on the head.

If you want to instantly lose all credibility with me, reference “stopping power” as part of your decision to purchase a pistol.

If you buy into the hype about “stopping power,” get a S&W 500.

Remove “stopping power” from your vocabulary, and replace it with “shot placement.”

Why do I carry 9mm? Because I know that 1, 2, or maybe even more shots are PROBABLY not going to incapacitate someone, no matter what caliber you are shooting. 9mm is cheap to shoot, and I can afford to practice with it a lot more then 40 (and I even reload).
These are exactly the reasons why I chose 9mm over .40 as well. I'll also add that the 9mm's lighter recoil will equate to faster follow up shots too.
 

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In the end; The best caliber for you is the one that you are going to repeatedly train and practice with. That includes drawing from concealment quickly, moving targets, targets behind cover/hostage (your family), shooting from cover, et al.
Roger that! We fight the way we train!
 

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I went to Gander Mountain to hold the XD(M) before I bought it from another seller and had the "stopping power" chat with the guy showing me the gun. He asked me why I wanted the XD(M) in 9mm when the .40 was the same price and had more "stopping power". I asked him if he'd ever been shot by a 9mm, and if he had, would he have thought the 9mm just wasn't enough to make him stop. Of course, he replied he'd never been shot by a 9mm and if he had he probably would have not preferred to be shot by it again.

Anyways, Gander Mountain wanted $679 or something ridiculous, so I went to a local guy and had him order for something like $589. Was supposed to be next day, but ended up getting there 2 nights after. I had to head to the terminal Friday night, didn't get the call until Saturday morning. Won't be home until Friday/Saturday, now, so I have to get another purchase permit.

I'm pretty sure everyone here will agree that getting shot by a 9mm would be enough to make them rethink their decision to attack you.

(BTW, first post here. Got the XD(M) 9mm sitting at the gun shop, waiting for me to get home, then get another purchase permit, then take it home. :rolleyes:)
 

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I am a .40 guy and only buy pistols in this caliber. 9mm is ridiculously easy to shoot than .40. Whenever I shoot 9mm it feels like a .22, and after I pick up a .40 again my shots are all over the place for a while. I don't recommend .40 to most people because it requires so much practice, and it's not as fun as 9mm or .45. I'm just one of those people who is not part of the "nine is fine" crowd when it comes to self defense for personal irrational reasons. Besides that, .357 sig requires nothing more than a barrel and maybe a spring change, and that is a 9mm I would actually tust.
 

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The .40 does take a bit of getting used to, but like others posted above, once you get used to it, it's CRAZY accurate:



That target I fired at from 25 yards freehanded (2 handed hold), slow fire with a XD40 SUBCOMPACT... that's right 25 yards.... that's one heck of an accomplishment with a subbie....

I'll keep my .40's because I love em... but recently I have aquired four 9mm's to keep me company :grin:
 
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