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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone looking for some help with my .45 xdm 3.8". When at the gun range or cycling through rounds the slide does not return to its proper place when ready to fire. It gets stuck about 1/4 of an inch from its normal position. All I have to do is push with my thumb and it will easily go to its proper position. Also when I am field stripping and lift the release knob up the slide slides right off without needing to squeeze the trigger. My other full size xd does not have any of these issues. I would like to know of anyone can shed some light on what could be the cause. Thank you for your time.
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It looks like your XDM has been well loved and used often. Did the previous owner say how many rounds had been put through it? I owned two of these and had to replace the recoil spring assembly when it started acting like yours. Call Springfield customer service and they'll sell you a replacement.

As far as not having to pull the trigger to remove the slide, that's normal for a XDM. The knob is connected to a disconnect lever which locks the sear back, so you don't have to pull the trigger to remove the slide.
 

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I agree with @choo2x. Call Springfield and they'll probably tell you it is the recoil spring. Last-time I bought one it was like $30.00. Don't know if the price has gone up though.

To add, the XDM has the disassembler that choo2x was explaining, whereas the standard XD does not have a disassembler so the trigger needs to be pulled while field stripping, so both sound like they're behaving normally during take down.
 

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With the failure to fully return to battery, it could be that a combination of the "sensitivity" of .45 ACP chambering XD-platform guns, when combined with both some fouling (due to even normal use) and a well-used recoil spring could all be contributing in varying degree .

Towards remediation on the range, as you noted, a simple, light tap forward towards the muzzle restores the gun to full-battery, and this is an accepted method of stoppage reduction in all autopistols of this type.

If you are seeing persistent issues, start looking at the ammo: take note of what does/does not cause the failure-to-battery for you, to see if there's any noticeable consistency there, and simply avoid ammo that causes said issue.

If the gun comes to you with unknown provenance, spending some money to refurbish its recoil spring -as well as other critical springs- may well be worth the peace-of-mind, particularly if it's a gun that's destined for more serious use, be it competition, self/home-defense, or duty.

Finally, know that as many reciprocating-slide autopistols get dirtier and dirtier from either simple carbon fouling through repeated use -or more directly, actual ingress of dirt/debris from use in harsh environments- it is more likely to start to suffer from a failure to fully return-to-battery. This is not abnormal, and it also tends to first manifest on smaller variants of the same weapon in a family, versus its full-sized counterpart. If this is a stoppage that is a "new arrival" for you and you happen to have not have cleaned/lubed the weapon for a while (no, this is not criticism, honest), take note of approximately what kind of round-count you were able to reach prior to seeing trouble occur. This can help you establish a rough "service interval" for your weapon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you all for the information. Extremely helpful. I bought it off of GB from a pawn shop and they didn't mention any of that info. I will give them a call. Thank you again
 

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Mine did that when I first got it. It turned out to be the extractor, which was a few thousandths too long, and pushed the case into the side of the frame. I took a few thousandths off of the extractor hook, and it has run fine ever since. Slowly run an empty case into the chamber with the extractor engaged and you can see this readily, if that’s the problem.
My personal opinion is that Springfield used a 9mm extractor hook in some of these pistols, causing the FRB you described.
 
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