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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello -

This is my first post out here.

I'm no pro by any means, but I know a bit about handguns and have owned a few over the years. I owned an XD 9MM for quite a while and I loved it. I shot well with it out of the gate. I recently upgraded to an XD .45 4" Service Model. This is the first gun I've purchased without trying it out first. I just figured it would be like my 9MM, only more expensive every trigger pull.

I am shooting way low and to the left. I should have taken some pics of the grouping to show you guys, but at about 25 feet or so, aiming for dead center on a silhouette target, I repeatedly blew off what would have been the targets right hip.

My buddy was shooting his new Glock 9MM Gen 4 (can never remember their model numbers), and he gave me two clips to squeeze off, and not changing my stance or grip, I was shooting right where I was aiming.

I've seen lots of posts with folks with this problem, and a lot say it has to do with the stance or pulling up on the gun or squeezing the trigger too hard. I was thinking it was me, but shot fine with the glock and with my XD9 prior to the .45. Is it something inherent to a .45, or is something not right with the gun? I also tried another kind of ammo while I was there. Same weight (230) and rated fps, just different brand, and shot the same. Would lighter ammo make a difference?

I saw older posts that said SA was putting the wrong sights on some guns for a while, but that was several years ago. The spent casing that came with the gun was dated just last month, so I know it's not old stock or anything.

I am left handed if that has any impact on anybody's input.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions!
 

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It's you, the Glock and XD are different animals. Going from a 9 to a 45 could be throwing you out of whack. Try shooting left hand I bet you suddenly stop shooting low and left.
 

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You could be flinching a little, because of perceived recoil. Or in the case of an XD/XDm, not holding it tight enough. JMHO
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the feedback guys.

I do shoot left handed. I never conform to the right handed world, so I just always put up with casings flying across my right arm.

I'm willing to accept it's me. It's just weird that my XD9 was just fine as well as my buddy's Glock. I've shot glocks before and usually am not very good with them.

I'll definitely chock up the first two magazines to perceived recoil. I had no idea what to expect, but I ran 150 rounds through it.

Maybe I'll just have to run a few hundred more through and see what happens.
 

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Low & left is odd for a left handed shooter, usually low right, you are mashing the trigger. Have another shooter shoot it. That will confirm it's you or the gun. Just the pad of the trigger finger, light pressure with your support hand.
Before I start a training session with new shooters, I shoot each gun to verify the gun is solid. Only way to evaluate what the shooter is doing.
 

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Thanks for the feedback guys.

I do shoot left handed. I never conform to the right handed world, so I just always put up with casings flying across my right arm.

I'm willing to accept it's me. It's just weird that my XD9 was just fine as well as my buddy's Glock. I've shot glocks before and usually am not very good with them.

I'll definitely chock up the first two magazines to perceived recoil. I had no idea what to expect, but I ran 150 rounds through it.

Maybe I'll just have to run a few hundred more through and see what happens.
The increased recoil is making you flinch. Buy some "snap caps" (fake bullets) and have someone else mix them in with your real ammo in a magazine (or you could do it yourself if you don't cheat and peek). You'll notice that when you pull the trigger on a fake round, your weapon drops low and to the left as you brace for the recoil. Let the gun fire, don't make it fire by jerking the trigger. This is accomplished by slowly pulling the trigger with a smooth motion. This will prevent you from knowing exactly when it is going to fire, therefore preventing you from flinching at the moment the gun goes off. The end.
 

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If you look down below at the newly-minted "Similar Threads" section you'll see that a lot of shooters (including me) have the same experience. I would very much like to blame the gun, but its most likely me. Last time out I shot three different handguns low and left, all grouping around 7-8:00.

I'm working on it.
 

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Think of the trigger like a lever to be moved incrementally, not a button to be pressed instantly.
 

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Have you benched the gun, yet?

Take yourself out of the equation as much as possible. Bench it/bag it. Let someone else - a known good shooter - shoot it benched/bagged.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I do play a lot of video games, so it's likely that I'm mashing the trigger like a button.

I found a troubleshooting target that indicated low and left for a left handed shooter was due to squeezing the whole grip, not just the trigger. that matches up with all the perceived recoil comments.

I'll get back put to the range in a week or two.

If anybody breaks in between now and then, I'll just have to aim for their left shoulder.
 

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I do play a lot of video games, so it's likely that I'm mashing the trigger like a button.
Certainly possible - each gun's trigger path is unique, so there's always a learning curve involved. :)

One of my favorite local instructors is really big on "knowing the trigger path." I really like what he'd said - that it's probably one of the least sexy parts of shooting: but it's so, so critical.

Find what works for you so that you "finish flat." What really helped me was the "Triggerstripe" series from Haley Strategic/Ron Avery:


^ That, and realizing that yes, the pad of the index finger is the by-Hoyle ideal for a trigger setup like those on our XD-platform pistols, but in the real-world, in-execution, based on the anatomy and articulation of each unique shooter, this "ideal" can vary.

The idea isn't to stick to that ideal - but to simply "finish flat." :)

I found a troubleshooting target that indicated low and left for a left handed shooter was due to squeezing the whole grip, not just the trigger. that matches up with all the perceived recoil comments.

I'll get back put to the range in a week or two.
Be careful in the use of those "correction targets."

Don't get me wrong - I do think they're useful.

However, in using them, I also think it's vital that the shooter realize the context in which they were first done-up. This article on Pistol-Training.com is worth reading:

pistol-training.com Blog Archive Do 8217 s and Don 8217 ts of the 8220 Correction Target 8221

Yes, the targets do work two-handed, but its value is somewhat diminished and the support hand does put another set of variables into the equation.

If anybody breaks in between now and then, I'll just have to aim for their left shoulder.
:lol: That's awesome. :lol:

OK, in all seriousness, Chris Cerino, another of my favorite local instructors, put up this excellent article a couple of years ago:

TRAINING TIPS Need a sight adjustment Think again - TheGunMag - The Official Gun Magazine of the Second Amendment FoundationTheGunMag 8211 The Official Gun Magazine of the Second Amendment Foundation

^ Don't pursue a hardware fix to a software problem. :wink:

However, at the same time, that really does mean that you have to be sure that your gun is actually shooting POA/POI: and the only way to do that is to take - as much as possible - the human aspect out of play. Shoot the gun benched or bagged. Let a known-quantity good shooter shoot the gun benched/bagged. Put the gun in a rest. Actually make sure that gun is mechanically doing what it's supposed to do, before you start chasing things.

Yes, it's more than likely that you're to blame rather than that the sights are off. But if you're a relatively experienced pistol shooter and have put in honest time on the gun already and are still having problems, this should be a first-line troubleshooting measure.
 

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Ironically, I shoot right on target with an XD(M) .45 & I've never touched the adjustable sights. Used to be that I would always miss low with my shots, even from the "mighty" 9mm. It drove me nuts, so I've been there. I tried to blamed the gun, but that got harder & harder as one gun after another did it.

Good luck.

Karl
 

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If you look down below at the newly-minted "Similar Threads" section you'll see that a lot of shooters (including me) have the same experience. I would very much like to blame the gun, but its most likely me. Last time out I shot three different handguns low and left, all grouping around 7-8:00.

I'm working on it.
Same with me. I corrected my grip and trigger pull and fixed most issues.
 

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I've recently switched to an xdm instead of a 1911. Even with a tuned trigger, shooting fast, it's an adjustment. Shooting slow, no problem, but the diff feel of the trigger pops up at speed. I'm gettin there though.;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well, thanks to everybody out there for all their suggestions. I've had a few trips to the range with this gun now and I am doing much better.

I think it was in one of the 'similar threads' below, somebody mentioned their shooting coach said they were anticipating recoil (which was also mentioned here), and that it wasn't anything that a thousand dry fires couldn't fix. I found that funny, so went and got some snap caps and took a few shots at a light switch. I'll be damned if the gun didn't go low and left as soon as I pulled the trigger - even knowing it wasn't going to shoot. I immediately did the same thing with a friend's 9mm again (because I wasn't doing this with my 9mm), and I didn't jerk it low and left. As soon as I went back to mine, I jerked it low and left again. Crazy. So, I shot at that damn light switch with snap caps until I didn't do that any more and then went to the range again.

I had to beef up my grip a little and get rid of a few old (and bad) habits, but doing much better.

Thanks again for all the suggestions. I really it.

Mike
 

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I had and still have the same problem you listed. When I first got my xds everything was low left. I did the exact same thing as you and dry fired hundreds of rounds. Before I pulled the trigger I would tell myself the gun won't come out of your hands and to squeeze the trigger and not pull it. My groups are much better now and the low left is only occasionally and not constant.


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Well, thanks to everybody out there for all their suggestions. I've had a few trips to the range with this gun now and I am doing much better.

I think it was in one of the 'similar threads' below, somebody mentioned their shooting coach said they were anticipating recoil (which was also mentioned here), and that it wasn't anything that a thousand dry fires couldn't fix. I found that funny, so went and got some snap caps and took a few shots at a light switch. I'll be damned if the gun didn't go low and left as soon as I pulled the trigger - even knowing it wasn't going to shoot. I immediately did the same thing with a friend's 9mm again (because I wasn't doing this with my 9mm), and I didn't jerk it low and left. As soon as I went back to mine, I jerked it low and left again. Crazy. So, I shot at that damn light switch with snap caps until I didn't do that any more and then went to the range again.

I had to beef up my grip a little and get rid of a few old (and bad) habits, but doing much better.

Thanks again for all the suggestions. I really it.

Mike
Every time a good guy gets better on the range a bad guy chokes on a chicken wing.
 

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Hello -

This is my first post out here.

I'm no pro by any means, but I know a bit about handguns and have owned a few over the years. I owned an XD 9MM for quite a while and I loved it. I shot well with it out of the gate. I recently upgraded to an XD .45 4" Service Model. This is the first gun I've purchased without trying it out first. I just figured it would be like my 9MM, only more expensive every trigger pull.

I am shooting way low and to the left. I should have taken some pics of the grouping to show you guys, but at about 25 feet or so, aiming for dead center on a silhouette target, I repeatedly blew off what would have been the targets right hip.

My buddy was shooting his new Glock 9MM Gen 4 (can never remember their model numbers), and he gave me two clips to squeeze off, and not changing my stance or grip, I was shooting right where I was aiming.

I've seen lots of posts with folks with this problem, and a lot say it has to do with the stance or pulling up on the gun or squeezing the trigger too hard. I was thinking it was me, but shot fine with the glock and with my XD9 prior to the .45. Is it something inherent to a .45, or is something not right with the gun? I also tried another kind of ammo while I was there. Same weight (230) and rated fps, just different brand, and shot the same. Would lighter ammo make a difference?

I saw older posts that said SA was putting the wrong sights on some guns for a while, but that was several years ago. The spent casing that came with the gun was dated just last month, so I know it's not old stock or anything.

I am left handed if that has any impact on anybody's input.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions!
Just aim high and to the right.
 
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