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I've been searching and reading, searching and reading, searching and reading, and I think I'm ready to post a thread without coming off like an idiot, so here goes...

I was really into guns about 15 years ago, and have since fallen out of touch with the gun world in general, but I'm going to buy a semi-auto handgun and was originally looking at the Sig P226. I was told about the XD and started looking into it, and so far I'm pretty impressed by what I've seen. I think I'm about ready to pull the trigger on one, I'm just not sure what exactly to buy.

Caliber-wise I'm thinking .40, because I see that you can drop in a .357 SIG barrel and also a 9mm conversion barrel as well. I used to have a friend with a TC Contender and we loved swapping barrels between .223 and .44 mag and had tons of fun with both calibers, so that idea of a convertible gun appeals to me. Plus I think a 9 would be more fun for my wife to shoot. But for starters it will just be .40.

The main purpose of the weapon will be for target shooting/plinking/having fun. I don't hunt and don't carry presently, but in my research I've found that a CCW in WA state is easy to get, so I might get one just to exercise my right to have it. With the intended usage in mind, I'm attracted to the XDm's higher capacity and better trigger and barrel.

So here's my questions:
1. I read somewhere that the trigger assembly had to be removed on the XD but not on the XDM to field strip the gun. I watched a video by a member here, and it looked as though the XD broke down really easily though, and no fussing with the trigger was required.
2. The price difference between the guns is about $250 locally. I see in researching that Springer has a trigger modification which should be BETTER than the XDm stock trigger, and it is less expensive than $250. What I have not seen is anything other than anecdotal evidence of accuracy. Does the barrel make enough of a difference to justify the cost? Has anyone produced accuracy tests from a Ransom Rest or at least a bench rest testing of the one vs the other?
3. After reading and reading, I'm still not sure that the trigger and barrel and capacity are the only differences. Is there something else that distinguishes the one from the other that I'm missing?
4. I do not see a .357 SIG barrel available for the XDm. I am not sure whether the XD barrel would work or not. I thought both the XD and XDm came in a 4" barrel, but I would swear that when I went to the range the XDm looked a bit longer. I've seen aftermarket XD barrels, but not XDm barrels. Is that because they are the same or they just haven't hit the market yet?
5. If I did decide to use my still to be obtained CCW permit, it seems like that trigger work would be out of the question. I take it non-modded trigger is the safe way to go for carry. It almost seems like a Glock or DA revolver with a LONG pull would be safer for CCW purpose. Am I on the right track here?

Anything else I should know about one vs the other before putting some cash down?
 

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Welcome to XDTalk!

1) You don't need to remove the trigger assembly for either. You do need to to pull the trigger ("dry fire") the XD. You don't need to do anything with the trigger for the XDM.

2) A Springer trigger job would give you a better trigger than the stock XDM trigger. Accuracy "should" be better in the XDM, but I would say only marginally for most shooters. The XD and XDM are both plenty accurate, but they are combat/defense firearms, and are not built for absolute precision accuracy. In 99% of cases, they are both more accurate than the guy behind the trigger.

3) There are some other minor differences. Barrel length, match barrel, grip texture, interchangeable backstraps, takedown procedure, etc.

4) The XDM only comes in 9MM and .40, a .45 is probably coming, but I don't see a .357 SIG coming.

5) The stock trigger is safe for CCW. Some trigger jobs would be plenty safe for CCW as well. If you are going to CCW I would not reduce the spring strength much, but I wouldn't have a problem reducing takeup of reset of the trigger.

I hope that helps...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Good info, thanks. I think that settles it. XD looks like a winner to me.

I'm going to head to the range and shoot one or both tonight just to be sure.
 

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Where do you live in WA? Ben's Loans in Renton has had XDm-9's and a guy quoted it at 599. I just bought my XD 5" Tactical at 509. The 4" Service should be like 490-something. Only 100 dollars difference if you buy there.
 

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It looks like most of your questions have been answered already. But I would say that you should look around more as the price difference between the standard xd and the xdm shouldnt be $250. Maybe $100 bucks; you should be able to find an xd for $500 give or take $30, and an xdm for $600 give or take $30.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm on the east side just outside Woodinville, but after shooting every .40 that Wade's had to rent, I ended up going with the P226. It felt better in my hand and was a lot more accurate than the XD and XDm that I tried. I ended up ordering a factory refurbished P226 and paid $619. I guess the story there is that these are used cop guns that are sent back to Sig and when Sig sells them they're essentially good as new. Got it from Survival Arms in Bellevue, I'll be able to pick it up on the 18th.
 

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1. I read somewhere that the trigger assembly had to be removed on the XD but not on the XDM to field strip the gun. I watched a video by a member here, and it looked as though the XD broke down really easily though, and no fussing with the trigger was required.

Both the XD and XDm can be field stripped very easily, however the XD requires dry firing the pistol during slide removal and this has led to some Negligent Discharges. If you get an XD, make sure you drop the magazine and wrack the slide at least 3 times before locking it back and ALWAYS LOOK AT THE CHAMBER. As for removing the trigger assembly, this is not required for normal cleaning and is NOT recomended by Springfield.

2. The price difference between the guns is about $250 locally. I see in researching that Springer has a trigger modification which should be BETTER than the XDm stock trigger, and it is less expensive than $250. What I have not seen is anything other than anecdotal evidence of accuracy. Does the barrel make enough of a difference to justify the cost? Has anyone produced accuracy tests from a Ransom Rest or at least a bench rest testing of the one vs the other?

The trigger in the XDm is claimed to be improved over that of the XD. In practical terms, I do NOT think that improvement is at all noticable, they are both somewhat lacking for competitive shooting but good enough that practice can overcome the excess creep and heavy pull. Bascially, they are very safe and require a real concious effort to release. Which means that double taps are WORK but it also means that accidental double taps, or discharges, just won't happen. I would recomend that you leave the trigger totally stock until you actually find that it's an impediment to competitive shooting in IDPA and the like. The simple fact is that most shooting ranges REALLY frown on ceilings being shot by newbies with race guns they don't know how to use. As for the reset length, IMO that issue is oversold. During practice you should be releasing the trigger during recoil and that release will normally be much longer than the reset length of either pistol.

3. After reading and reading, I'm still not sure that the trigger and barrel and capacity are the only differences. Is there something else that distinguishes the one from the other that I'm missing?

What you are missing is the added feature of a configurable grip. For some shooters this can be make or break. For those with totally average size hands it's meaninless. The standard grip insert in the XDm and the stock XD-40 grip are identical and fit the average sized hand perfectly. Also the XDm-40 uses a magazine that is 0.050 inch wider than the XD-40 and it carries 16 rounds versus 12 in the XD. Magazines are NOT interchangeable between the two series.

4. I do not see a .357 SIG barrel available for the XDm. I am not sure whether the XD barrel would work or not. I thought both the XD and XDm came in a 4" barrel, but I would swear that when I went to the range the XDm looked a bit longer. I've seen aftermarket XD barrels, but not XDm barrels. Is that because they are the same or they just haven't hit the market yet?

I expect at some point we will see a 357 SIG barrel for the XDm, it's just too new for that to have occured. I also expect that we will see 9mm conversion kits for the XDm-40 at some point in the future. BTW, the XD series can be had in 3, 4, or 5 inch barrel lengths, currently the XDm is only offered with a 4.5 inch barrel. Obviously, barrels for the XD series won't fit the XDm so in any barrel shopping you'll have to be careful about making sure of your selection. Also, be VERY careful about mixing calibers if you decide to re-configure any of your pistols. To many reports of people shooting 9mm cartridges up the barrel of their 40 caliber pistols has led me to be a one caliber only shooter, which is the 40. With a 180 grain bullet, the recoil of the XD series pistol is not much different than a 9mm, it's only when you light off a light, fast round when the 40 gets "snappy".

5. If I did decide to use my still to be obtained CCW permit, it seems like that trigger work would be out of the question. I take it non-modded trigger is the safe way to go for carry. It almost seems like a Glock or DA revolver with a LONG pull would be safer for CCW purpose. Am I on the right track here?

I think your on the right track here. The use of a grip safety on the XD series pistol actually makes them a bit safer to carry than a Glock. In terms of the trigger, both the Glock and the XD are quite similar, however that grip safety can provide an added level of security during a draw in the event that your finger should hit the trigger during a "panic" draw. When I practice drawing my XDm I keep my thumb on the cocked indicator so that the grip safety can't be engaged until I birng the pistol to the target when I swing my thumb over and move my trigger finger to the trigger. It should be noted that during practice, you should always practice drawing the pistol with the trigger finger outside of the trigger guard, otherwise you could end up shooting yourself with either a Glock or an XD, especially if you grip then pull. That grip safety won't protect you unless you practice using it. One other plus for using your thumb on the cocked indicator is you'll know very quickly if your really ready to fire before drawing your pistol.

Now, for IWB carry, I prefer a pistol that is as slim as possible. For this reason I just purchased a Sig Sauer P239 in 40 caliber with the DA/SA trigger. In double action, the pull is nearly identical to a Smith & Wesson revolver, long, a touch stagey, and fairly heavy at a quoted 10 lbs.. With that trigger, it's nearly impossible to shoot yourself during a draw. However, I don't even want to think about what could happen if I ever forgot to de-cock the pistol before holstering, in Single Action the break is about 3.5 lbs. with zero creep. Which is why I always make sure to practice keeping my bugger hook out of the trigger guard EVERY SINGLE TIME I draw the pistol.

Anything else I should know about one vs the other before putting some cash down?[/quote]

My advice would be to shoot both pistols and choose the one that seems the best fit. One plus for either for me was that they point very well. I tried a nearly every polymer offered before choosing my XDm and found that I always shot best with either the XD or the XDm. I chose the XDm simply because I think it looks a bit better than the XD because in my hands I shot equally well with both. One thing to note is that still stands true, for some reason the XD pistols point really well for me. I have to work harder at rapid fire with my XDm than with my Sig but the superior point means that I still shoot better in rapid fire with my XDm despite the fact the trigger in the Sig is superior. In slow fire, they are just about equal, the longer sight radius of the XDm balances out the superior SA trigger in the Sig.
 
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