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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys! This is my first post on this forum. I am also in the process of purchasing my first carry gun. I have been doing a lot of research on a lot of different guns, but I keep coming back to the XD Mod.2 3" 9mm. I was talking to a friend who knows a crap ton about guns, worked at a gun range for a while, and builds ARs. I respect his opinion because he obviously knows a lot more than me. This was his reply when I asked him why he doesn't like Springfield:

As far as my dislike of the Springfield xd, I have a few issues with it. First, it has a super high bore axis which makes the recoil a lot heavier and much snappier than something with a low bore axis. This also causes an issue with follow up target acquisition because the gun isn’t recoiling into the hand, its recoiling more into itself.

Second is the grip safety, it has a grip safety like that of a 1911 which is a COMPLETELY outdated design, having a grip safety can cause a lot of potential issues that would not occur with any other handgun. One of the issues that could occur with it is if any kind of debris or build up finds its way into the area, and the grip safety cannot be actuated, then the handgun will not operate. Also, since it is a design taken from the 1911, the idea and concept of it is over 100 years outdated and unnecessary.

Third, they’re actually not really made by Springfield, they’re made by a company in Croatia called HS Produkt, and imported and assembled in the US.

Fourth, it is a REALLY tall gun, which kind of goes along with the high bore axis, but the design just is really blocky and sits really high in the hand which I couldn’t stand while shooting.


For his first point, is that something that could change depending on the body type and strength of who is shooting? He is about 5'5", and I am 6'4". I can't help but think that the recoil would affect me differently than him.

For his second point, if the grip safety COULD cause so many issues, how come it doesn't? I've read so many reviews on the gun, and not one has mentioned any problems with the grip safety. Some people don't like it, but I haven't read about any problems with it jamming and causing the gun to not function properly.

For the third point, I really don't care about that. They could be made by a company called Princess Pink Cotton Candy, and if they're sold under the Springfield name and work properly, I would buy it.

For the last point, again, I feel like that's just a preference.

I would love to hear some input on this! I really love the Mod.2, and think it would be a great option for me. I just wanna clear this up!
 

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Your friend sure is a wealth of information! o_O

1. Yes... the Springfield does have a higher bore axis than some pistols... and a lower one than some others have. If the chart below is correct...the Springfield has a "super high bore axis" that is approx. .25" higher than a Glock 17 . Whether or not that makes it "heavier and snappier" is something you would have to decide for yourself... as that is subjective to the person shooting it. To me... the Springfield is no snappier than other pistols in the same category... Glock, M&P... etc.

2. As for your answer/reasoning that you gave for #2... not sure I can improve on that. ;)

3. Same goes for your #3 answer.

4.Ditto for your fourth.

I have four Springfields... and many other makes and models as well. Other than my Colt 1911... my Springfields are by far my favorites... and the only ones I even carry (or shoot) anymore. My suggestion would be to go somewhere that you can rent, shoot, and compare the pistols you are interested in... and go from there.
 

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Will the higher bore axis produce more muzzle rise?

It's physics. Yes, it will.

But how much this will affect you versus any other shooter is based on strength and - even more so - technique, as well as subjective/objective "fit"of the gun's grip to your hand(s).


^ That's Chris Cerino, two-time runner up (always the bridesmaid, never the bride!) on The History Channel's Top Shot (Season 1, and then again in All-Stars). He's also a former Federal Air Marshal.

Look at his recoil control. That an XDm 3.8 Compact that he's using for that segment. It's analogous to the Mod2 3".

As a professional shooter in action-shooting sports, he's got a heck of a grip. I'm no He-Man, but I'd also be lying if I said that I was a pencil-neck weakling, too. I don't have exceptional grip strength, but I can close-out a CoC #2, so that's at least average....and when Cerino came around in class to demonstrate to us (we each held our handgun with our dominant hand only, his non-dominant hand in-turn enclosed ours around the gun) "how much grip" he puts into his support hand "grip," I was literally shocked.

And you bet that I started gripping much harder, too, after that demo. ;)

Will you be able to shoot a gun with a lower bore-axis faster (i.e. with faster "splits," or less time between shots)?

This isn't totally a bore-axis issue. Although a higher bore axis will induce more muzzle flip and that will make your split times larger (i.e. you'll shoot slower between shots), the comparison between different guns is less valid because there's also the interaction of your hand with the grip/frame of the different weapons (remembering that grip is all about recoil mitigation), as well as extrinsic factors such as the weight and weight distribution of the different weapons.

As for the grip safety?

http://www.xdtalk.com/threads/springfield-xd-mcrib.402537/

This thread is pretty long, and some of my posts in this thread happen to be very long, themselves, but if you take the time to read it thoroughly, you'll see not only both my objective concerns with the grip safety, as well as what I feel are its shortcomings, but also what, in my experience and in others, has not manifest about the supposed reliability of this mechanism.

However, with that said, southpaw6789, your screen-name gives me a bit of a pause....

Are you left-handed?

If so, I would highly recommend that you not only shoot the gun, but that you also take the time to attempt, safely (and under supervision of someone who knows how to do it properly, if you don't know how to do so, yourself) both dry as well as live-fire single-handed stoppage reductions with the Mod2. The righty-centric nature of the slide-lock/release, combined with the grip safety, can make left-handed, single-handed manipulations nearly impossible for some end-users as based on their hand size, anatomy, as well as articulation - can you successfully lock that slide back for a double-feed remediation?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Will the higher bore axis produce more muzzle rise?

It's physics. Yes, it will.

But how much this will affect you versus any other shooter is based on strength and - even more so - technique, as well as subjective/objective "fit"of the gun's grip to your hand(s).


^ That's Chris Cerino, two-time runner up (always the bridesmaid, never the bride!) on The History Channel's Top Shot (Season 1, and then again in All-Stars). He's also a former Federal Air Marshal.

Look at his recoil control. That an XDm 3.8 Compact that he's using for that segment. It's analogous to the Mod2 3".

As a professional shooter in action-shooting sports, he's got a heck of a grip. I'm no He-Man, but I'd also be lying if I said that I was a pencil-neck weakling, too. I don't have exceptional grip strength, but I can close-out a CoC #2, so that's at least average....and when Cerino came around in class to demonstrate to us (we each held our handgun with our dominant hand only, his non-dominant hand in-turn enclosed ours around the gun) "how much grip" he puts into his support hand "grip," I was literally shocked.

And you bet that I started gripping much harder, too, after that demo. ;)

Will you be able to shoot a gun with a lower bore-axis faster (i.e. with faster "splits," or less time between shots)?

This isn't totally a bore-axis issue. Although a higher bore axis will induce more muzzle flip and that will make your split times larger (i.e. you'll shoot slower between shots), the comparison between different guns is less valid because there's also the interaction of your hand with the grip/frame of the different weapons (remembering that grip is all about recoil mitigation), as well as extrinsic factors such as the weight and weight distribution of the different weapons.

As for the grip safety?

http://www.xdtalk.com/threads/springfield-xd-mcrib.402537/

This thread is pretty long, and some of my posts in this thread happen to be very long, themselves, but if you take the time to read it thoroughly, you'll see not only both my objective concerns with the grip safety, as well as what I feel are its shortcomings, but also what, in my experience and in others, has not manifest about the supposed reliability of this mechanism.

However, with that said, southpaw6789, your screen-name gives me a bit of a pause....

Are you left-handed?

If so, I would highly recommend that you not only shoot the gun, but that you also take the time to attempt, safely (and under supervision of someone who knows how to do it properly, if you don't know how to do so, yourself) both dry as well as live-fire single-handed stoppage reductions with the Mod2. The righty-centric nature of the slide-lock/release, combined with the grip safety, can make left-handed, single-handed manipulations nearly impossible for some end-users as based on their hand size, anatomy, as well as articulation - can you successfully lock that slide back for a double-feed remediation?
Yes, I am left-handed. Could you please translate that last paragraph into plain English? Haha.
 

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TSI has a well reasoned and formatted response to your initial post. Can't really expand on that fact wise. A couple of personal experiences though.

I run both a full size XDM .40 with the 4.5" barrel and an XDMc with the 3.8" barrel (same as in video above). Both with several thousand rounds through them at this point.

I moved from a Glock to the XDM's and "FOR ME", with the XDM's there is either less of a felt recoil or the grip angle makes the difference but I can control it better. The bore axis does not seem to matter ... again.. subjectively speaking, for me VS a Glock.

For the grip safety, I have run the XDM's with their grip safety with that round count above, working in classes with both two hand and single strong and support hand shooting, as well as malfunction drills etc, and except for "intentional failures" that were induced by the instructor, I have had zero failures of any sort. I know they may/can/will break or have a failure at some point, but as of now, no issues.

When it comes to every day carry, I rotate my "partners" through the cycle, depending on weather / clothing / places I will be and type of environment (permissive or less than permissive shall we say). The slight difference in height of the gun (I carry the XDMc as an EDC piece) vs the S&W M&P9c or even my Kahr CW40 is really insignificant when it comes to concealment. The grip is what really causes the printing issue, and with a flush mount mag, the XDMc or the Mod 2 you are looking at, can conceal just fine with the right belt / holster combination.

As long as you can get to fire one at the range before you buy, just to make sure nothing weird gives you issues... (it happens, everyone is different)...... I don't think you can go wrong with the XD / XDM line. I run the M's because at the time of purchase they had the largest mag capacity available in a handgun for the caliber. I think they still do. (Not including modified guns or aftermarket add ons.....).
 
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Ok, I'm not an expert by any stretch of the imagination. All I can do is try to relate MY experiences with Mod 2's. I've got Mod 2's in 9mm and .45. I've gone through approx 35 handguns in about 10 years, looking for "it." IMO, the Mod 2's are no more snappy than any other pistol I've had. Maybe I've just gotten better with my grip with time? IMO, Mod 2's ARE more accurate than anything I'VE had, except for my CZ Rami and PCR D. Those 4 are neck & neck at the range. I AM more accurate with the Mod 2's when I shoot at a fairly rapid pace. If I take my time, neither blows the others away. Lately, I've actually been better with the .45 vs the 9mm, even when picking up the pace. A Glock 30 is smaller and lighter, but loses a few rounds vs the Mod's. A Shield 9mm or 45 loses rounds vs the Mod's. The heftier Mod's are not THAT much heavier. I carry one of them every day. Glocks are good guns. I'm not into them, though. Shield's are good guns. IMO, the Mod's are just better all 'round than Shield. (We've got two Shield 9mm's) I've had XD's, XDm's and now Mod 2's. IMO, the Mod 2 blows the other two away in "feel." The grip is perfect....except for the silly GRIP ZONE crap. Ergonomics are perfect for me. My eyes appreciate the XS BIG DOT night sights that are on my Mod's and the CZ's.
 

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Hey guys! This is my first post on this forum. I am also in the process of purchasing my first carry gun. I have been doing a lot of research on a lot of different guns, but I keep coming back to the XD Mod.2 3" 9mm. I was talking to a friend who knows a crap ton about guns, worked at a gun range for a while, and builds ARs. I respect his opinion because he obviously knows a lot more than me. This was his reply when I asked him why he doesn't like Springfield:

As far as my dislike of the Springfield xd, I have a few issues with it. First, it has a super high bore axis which makes the recoil a lot heavier and much snappier than something with a low bore axis. This also causes an issue with follow up target acquisition because the gun isn’t recoiling into the hand, its recoiling more into itself.

Second is the grip safety, it has a grip safety like that of a 1911 which is a COMPLETELY outdated design, having a grip safety can cause a lot of potential issues that would not occur with any other handgun. One of the issues that could occur with it is if any kind of debris or build up finds its way into the area, and the grip safety cannot be actuated, then the handgun will not operate. Also, since it is a design taken from the 1911, the idea and concept of it is over 100 years outdated and unnecessary.

Third, they’re actually not really made by Springfield, they’re made by a company in Croatia called HS Produkt, and imported and assembled in the US.

Fourth, it is a REALLY tall gun, which kind of goes along with the high bore axis, but the design just is really blocky and sits really high in the hand which I couldn’t stand while shooting.


For his first point, is that something that could change depending on the body type and strength of who is shooting? He is about 5'5", and I am 6'4". I can't help but think that the recoil would affect me differently than him.

For his second point, if the grip safety COULD cause so many issues, how come it doesn't? I've read so many reviews on the gun, and not one has mentioned any problems with the grip safety. Some people don't like it, but I haven't read about any problems with it jamming and causing the gun to not function properly.

For the third point, I really don't care about that. They could be made by a company called Princess Pink Cotton Candy, and if they're sold under the Springfield name and work properly, I would buy it.

For the last point, again, I feel like that's just a preference.

I would love to hear some input on this! I really love the Mod.2, and think it would be a great option for me. I just wanna clear this up!
Yeah for sure! I'm definitely not purchasing anything until I can hold and shoot it, so that's my next step. I just really love the look of the Mod.2!
 

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Just wanted to say this is my first time on site as well I’m a proud Springfield owner n I would def say I have the mod 2 in both 9mm n 40 cal and can’t say enough good love em both something about the mod 2s think are the best but if ur thinking the mod 2 in 9 for your first u can’t go wrong just an unbelievable gun in everyday so southpaw since I’m a lefty also most def go get one u will love it in just accuracy n every aspect
 

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As long as you can get to fire one at the range before you buy, just to make sure nothing weird gives you issues... (it happens, everyone is different)......
^ This is HUGE.

There are just those weird unique gun/person combos that happen, where no matter what, the results just turn out less-than optimal.

I'm a car guy, so I like to equate everything to cars. :) This one, though, is I think something that just about every adult can relate to, as they've probably shopped for a car at some point in their lives:

You know how you get into a car either in the showroom or on the floor at a car-show, and it just seems awesome? You love everything about it. The seats seem to be just right, the steering wheel and the control surfaces feel just so.

And then you take the car out for a test-drive, and before you've turned the first corner, you realize that the car's just not for you: the windshield curvature does something weird in your field-of-view, you can't adjust the vents to not blow directly on your face, you can't see because of the pillars' placement, whatever....just something that would not have come up, inside that showroom, with the car static?

That's the same with guns.

While a very experienced shooter may be able to tell a lot about the gun and how much he/she will like it (or not) just by fondling it at the counter at the local gun shop, it's always better to put a few mags' worth of rounds through the gun before you buy, if you can. It's like the difference between sitting in the car and the test drive. ;)

Personally, for example, I *_love_* the way the S&W M&Ps sit in my hands. That, for me, is as much of Goldilocks moment as any I've had.

But for the life of me, I just can't shoot those guns that well.

It's like that. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
^ This is HUGE.

There are just those weird unique gun/person combos that happen, where no matter what, the results just turn out less-than optimal.

I'm a car guy, so I like to equate everything to cars. :) This one, though, is I think something that just about every adult can relate to, as they've probably shopped for a car at some point in their lives:

You know how you get into a car either in the showroom or on the floor at a car-show, and it just seems awesome? You love everything about it. The seats seem to be just right, the steering wheel and the control surfaces feel just so.

And then you take the car out for a test-drive, and before you've turned the first corner, you realize that the car's just not for you: the windshield curvature does something weird in your field-of-view, you can't adjust the vents to not blow directly on your face, you can't see because of the pillars' placement, whatever....just something that would not have come up, inside that showroom, with the car static?

That's the same with guns.

While a very experienced shooter may be able to tell a lot about the gun and how much he/she will like it (or not) just by fondling it at the counter at the local gun shop, it's always better to put a few mags' worth of rounds through the gun before you buy, if you can. It's like the difference between sitting in the car and the test drive. ;)

Personally, for example, I *_love_* the way the S&W M&Ps sit in my hands. That, for me, is as much of Goldilocks moment as any I've had.

But for the life of me, I just can't shoot those guns that well.

It's like that. ;)
That makes a ton of sense! I just really need to get to a range to go shoot it. Thank you!
 

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^ No thanks needed, just glad to help. :)

Best of luck on your search - not every gun is meant for every person, so here's to the best, for whatever you do end up with! :)
 

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Bore axis in a 9mm is meaningless to me, and I'm just over 6-4 too so maybe that has something to do with it.

That said, and I've owned XD's, I think there are better choices out there. The M&P 2.0 Compact would be small and as easy or easier to carry than the XD, as would a Glock G19. Better triggers, especially the M&P, and in general better guns.

But it really does come down to your likes, try to shoot some at the range.

There is nothing wrong with the XD or the grip safety, in my opinion that's just noise created by keyboard tactical operators to have something to fuss about, but again I think there are better options.
 

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I have been carrying mine for a year and its perfect for me and I have 1300 rounds through it with no issues what so ever. I am not a big fan of the Glock 19 size carry, even though I think i could probably get used to one with a proper holster (stealth gear).

For me, a 3 inch barrel and barely getting 3 fingers on a grip is perfect size for me. As far as high bore axis, shoot the thing and you get used to it, just like any gun. I do agree that lower axis is easier for most people to follow up, but the problem with that statement is in a self defense situation you're only trying to put 3-8 shots into someone from likely a very close range. We're not trying to shoot a fist size grouping from 50 yards, its not necessarily a range gun.

Again, perfect for me, maybe not everyone. As much as I want a new M&P 2.0 9c , i have just have no reason to get ride of my beloved Mod.2 SC
 

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I did a ton of reading on guns, and who said what. I really was looking at getting a Sig 320. I went to the local ranges shot every 9mm they had to rent, made notes on each as i shot them. grip, feel, recoil, grouping, etc. then went back and shot the ones i really liked once more. in the end the top choice was the Springfield, which was NOT even on my radar or my readings.

I love the feel, the look, and i can pick it up all day and hit a tight grouping with out even trying. I was out at a gun show talking to a Sig guy about the 320 and he loves it, he then asked me if i ever shot it, I said yeah, and then told him i shot it love the feel but had a larger grouping and tended to pull when i shot it. i told him that when i pick up the Springfield and shoot it i get a tight grouping, and have not issues on the grip or handling. he started laughing and said, why the hell are you still looking, go buy a Springfield. You can learn to handle any gun and get good groupings, but why waste your time learning when you can do that with the Springfield.

now i Own the 9mm 4.0 and the 3.0 Mod 2 Love em both...
 

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Bore axis in a 9mm is meaningless to me, and I'm just over 6-4 too so maybe that has something to do with it.
Agreed.

Robert Vogel maintains that sheer athleticism and physical strength helps - and this is impossible to deny.

If a shooter can physically outmuscle the platform, then even the worst possible technique simply will not matter.

But on the flip side of this equation is the very real need for shooters of smaller physical stature and/or strength - or for those who suffer from physical compromises as a result of injury or disease - to try to perfect their technique in order to maximize recoil mitigation. To, in-essence, compensate for their physical shortcoming(s).

A really good example of this is Chris Costa, shooting either the 7.62 or a 12-gauge. He's *_got_* to have a good stance in order to be able to shoot those guns fast, simply because despite his innate athletic abilities and his physical strength, he just lacks the body mass to be able to stand against the recoil of the bigger calibers. Take a look at some of his videos - he even admits the same.

And at the same time, this should not be read to suggest that if you're crazy-bull strong or if you're as big as a mountain that you can ignore technique.

Rather, if you are lucky enough to have the physical prowess, that you should further seek to perfect your techinque: because the two combined will give you a tremendous advantage.

Examples?

Steve Fisher and Pat McNamara are perhaps the two best known and who have a lot of material out on YouTube.

Similarly, the video I cited in post 4, with Chris Cerino, also shows what a combination of physical size/strength and proper technique can do, together.

There is nothing wrong with the XD or the grip safety, in my opinion that's just noise created by keyboard tactical operators to have something to fuss about.....
It's real, and far from something that a keyboard jockey wants to fuss about.

And this comes from what I've observed of myself and other shooters - as someone who's put close to 100K rounds through 3 primary XDms over the course of the last 6 years and owns four. :)

I've seen folks have problems getting a good dominant grip on the gun out-of-the holster. To an extent, this is alleviated by training, but there are those form whom their hand and finger size, shape, and articulation are unique create true problems that cannot be "trained out." Similarly, this also remains a possibility under stress (i.e. actual physical combatives) that cannot be eliminated.

The support/reaction-hand-only manipulations issues are real, too, no matter if the shooter is left or right-hand dominant. I've seen both fail with their support-hand-only manipulations given the grip safety an the positioning of the slide-lock. If the shooter's hand/finger relation to the gun and its control surfaces is the actual underlying cause, then it is sadly also something that no amount of training/re-training can help.

There's no way around these issues. They are real.
 

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Agreed.

Robert Vogel maintains that sheer athleticism and physical strength helps - and this is impossible to deny.

If a shooter can physically outmuscle the platform, then even the worst possible technique simply will not matter.

But on the flip side of this equation is the very real need for shooters of smaller physical stature and/or strength - or for those who suffer from physical compromises as a result of injury or disease - to try to perfect their technique in order to maximize recoil mitigation. To, in-essence, compensate for their physical shortcoming(s).

A really good example of this is Chris Costa, shooting either the 7.62 or a 12-gauge. He's *_got_* to have a good stance in order to be able to shoot those guns fast, simply because despite his innate athletic abilities and his physical strength, he just lacks the body mass to be able to stand against the recoil of the bigger calibers. Take a look at some of his videos - he even admits the same.

And at the same time, this should not be read to suggest that if you're crazy-bull strong or if you're as big as a mountain that you can ignore technique.

Rather, if you are lucky enough to have the physical prowess, that you should further seek to perfect your techinque: because the two combined will give you a tremendous advantage.

Examples?

Steve Fisher and Pat McNamara are perhaps the two best known and who have a lot of material out on YouTube.

Similarly, the video I cited in post 4, with Chris Cerino, also shows what a combination of physical size/strength and proper technique can do, together.



It's real, and far from something that a keyboard jockey wants to fuss about.

And this comes from what I've observed of myself and other shooters - as someone who's put close to 100K rounds through 3 primary XDms over the course of the last 6 years and owns four. :)

I've seen folks have problems getting a good dominant grip on the gun out-of-the holster. To an extent, this is alleviated by training, but there are those form whom their hand and finger size, shape, and articulation are unique create true problems that cannot be "trained out." Similarly, this also remains a possibility under stress (i.e. actual physical combatives) that cannot be eliminated.

The support/reaction-hand-only manipulations issues are real, too, no matter if the shooter is left or right-hand dominant. I've seen both fail with their support-hand-only manipulations given the grip safety an the positioning of the slide-lock. If the shooter's hand/finger relation to the gun and its control surfaces is the actual underlying cause, then it is sadly also something that no amount of training/re-training can help.

There's no way around these issues. They are real.
I certainly don’t know anyone who trains as much as you do, and 100k rounds of ammo is a stunning number.

That said, when I offer an opinion on a gun it’s either based on my experience or I say nothing, I don’t pay attention to the training gurus or the general opinion from the YouTube gang. Just my 2 cents based on my ownership of it or shooting experience.

I’ve owned several XD’s and XDM’s and I think they’re a very solid if unspectacular gun and I’ve got no issues with the grip safety. Navyjayhawk says they’re the best polymer for bullseye and I don’t argue with him, he knows that world. You say they don’t hold up well in the tactical training world, and I believe you because you know that world.

But to answer the OP’s question, having owned them, and dozens of comparative guns, I’d have no hesitation telling someone who likes one to go ahead and buy one.
 

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You're splitting hairs when you start measuring bore axis in a pistol. Some of us tend to over-analyze when purchasing a nice gun. That's a good thing. However, you can over-research the whole thing too.
I've owned 5 different xd models including the xd mod.2 9mm subcompact you're talking about. I can shoot it right next to my glock 26 and not tell the difference between muzzle flip between the two.
You've got a round of ammo exploding in your hand and your trying to decide if one flips up 5% less than the other. Other factors have much more effect on shootability than bore axis: trigger, ergonomics, sights, barrel length.
I've put thousands of rounds through most all of pistols. Only a small handful have ever jammed. That grip safety has never been a problem and never will. There are dozens to hundreds of moving parts in a handgun. Adding one more to the mix won't effect it statistically speaking and speaking from my experience.

Bottom Line: Get the one that feels the best in your hand and shoots the best.

P.S. Your friend that hates XD pistols probably loves Glocks yet he probably won't acknowledge that Glock's subpar trigger, sights, and brick-like ergonomics have far more to do with shootability than the bore axis.
 

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You're splitting hairs when you start measuring bore axis in a pistol. Some of us tend to over-analyze when purchasing a nice gun. That's a good thing. However, you can over-research the whole thing too.
I've owned 5 different xd models including the xd mod.2 9mm subcompact you're talking about. I can shoot it right next to my glock 26 and not tell the difference between muzzle flip between the two.
You've got a round of ammo exploding in your hand and your trying to decide if one flips up 5% less than the other. Other factors have much more effect on shootability than bore axis: trigger, ergonomics, sights, barrel length.
I've put thousands of rounds through most all of pistols. Only a small handful have ever jammed. That grip safety has never been a problem and never will. There are dozens to hundreds of moving parts in a handgun. Adding one more to the mix won't effect it statistically speaking and speaking from my experience.

Bottom Line: Get the one that feels the best in your hand and shoots the best.

P.S. Your friend that hates XD pistols probably loves Glocks yet he probably won't acknowledge that Glock's subpar trigger, sights, and brick-like ergonomics have far more to do with shootability than the bore axis.
I’ll disagree entirely with most of that.

I could run a G30 a lot faster than I can run a XDM 3.8 Compact. A good part of that was the bore axis, imho; that XDM is slower to come back on target.

As for “subpar triggers”? The XD series pistols are considerably worse than stock Glock; while, yes, a Glock’s trigger has a bit of a spongy take up, it breaks clean; the XD’s trigger breaks, as I’ve said before, as crisply as a bowl of cold oatmeal...in other words, mushy and indistinct. The trigger is the biggest drawback with the XD series, in my experience, and shows the reason almost everyone advises to swap the stock unit out ASAP.
 

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I carry a sc .40 s+w off duty. two finger grip and I don't notice the "flip or snappiness" some mention. to each their own. I had a glock 27 and 33 I felt were "snappier" however the glock undercut on the trigger uard just doesn't fit my hands. It could be my personal perception. I'd recommend renting and shooting both if you could. I went back to back with an xds and a g43 and ended up with the xds simply because right off the bat I shot tighter. good luck whatever you get I'm sure it will be fine.
 
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