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I am new to this site and am planning to buy a XD Service model in the near future. I would like to get some honest opinions about the reliability of the XD9 vs the XD40. I like the fact that the cost of ammo would allow more economical shooting with the 9 but I also like the 40 for its greater potential. I currently shoot both rounds regularly so its not a matter of keeping with the same ammo.

The information that will help me decide will be the overall reliability of one vs the other. Is one more trouble prone to FTE's or FTF's? Are there any patterns or durability issues between the two that I should be aware of?

I have seen conversion barrels available that enable converting a 40 to a 9. Are they truly functional? I would imagine that different mags need to be used. Are springs/guide rods interchangeable with both barrels. How well do the two compare with POI with the sights?? Any change in reliability of function?

Basically I am asking which would you choose from a reliabiliy / durability perspective if you could ONLY have one. Yeh, I know, buy both. Initially, I can only get one, and I want to make the decision that could eventually lead me to having one of each.
 

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I'm in the same situation as Reliable... I really can't decide which one I'm going to pick up. But I'd go with the .40 IF and ONLY IF the 9mm conversion barrel is equal to and if not better than the factory xd 9mm.
 

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I have no idea how reliable the XD 40 is I only have a XD-9 and so far it has been flawless. Ihave owned a lot of guns over the past 30 years and as I firearms instructor I have seen how alot more perform.

A general observation is that guns tend to work best in the caliber they were originally designed for. NOw many guns chanbered for rounds other than the ones they were originally designed for work just fine. But personally if ti is a weapon I am going to bet my life on then it's going to be in the caliber it was designed around.
 

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I'm sorry to say, but the whole "caliber it was designed for" seems like a pretty lame excuse. Can anyone come up with any numbers to support this claim? Because it seems like someone just jumped to a conclusion which has been proliferated since.

http://www.hs2000talk.com/viewtopic.php?t=21609

According to that poll, the majority of owners on this board have the 40 service. Now I'm not saying the 40 is better because it has more owners, I am saying that you will probably hear more problems with it.

So, instead of just regurgitating information which we do not know to be fact, perhaps we can just share our experiences. For instance, my 40 Service has been utterly reliable. No malfs after 1250 rounds of assorted ammo is reliable in my book.
 

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Funny this post came up, I just got home from shooting over at a friends backyard firing range, after I bought my XD9 a few weeks ago I let him shoot it and he liked it so much he went to buy one, but he saw the XD40 for the same price and got it instead, anyway we just shot about 300 rounds each of WWB and Blazer and I didn't have any problems with my XD9 but he had 2 rounds that failed to enter the chamber and caused the slide to hang open, one was a WWB and the other was a Blazer. I know that doesn't mean much but he was kind of upset about it, plus he spent almost twice on the ammo as me!!! And we both shot the 9 better than the 40. I'll stick with the 9. He's going to send it to SA to have them look it over.
 

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I'm sorry to say, but the whole "caliber it was designed for" seems like a pretty lame excuse.
Excuse? excuse for what exactly?

Can anyone come up with any numbers to support this claim? Because it seems like someone just jumped to a conclusion which has been proliferated since.
Jumped to a conclusion? if you read what I said I based my general observation on 30 years of owning alot of different guns and also from my years of bieng a firearms instructor ( twenty years) so I dont think I "heard something" or jumped to a conclusion.

And last but not least, it is simple common sense that firearms chambered for the caliber they were designed for are generally more reliable than the SAME gun rechambered for another round. a reliable fireamr is a balance of frame and slide mass, spring strength and a host of other things related to the mechanical design. a design which is balanced for a particular round. Now change the caliber while trying to keep the weapon the same size ( or even reduce the size and it should be no suprise that the same weapon rechamberd for a different caliber isnt always as reliable as the original design.
 

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Cuda said:
Funny this post came up, I just got home from shooting over at a friends backyard firing range, after I bought my XD9 a few weeks ago I let him shoot it and he liked it so much he went to buy one, but he saw the XD40 for the same price and got it instead, anyway we just shot about 300 rounds each of WWB and Blazer and I didn't have any problems with my XD9 but he had 2 rounds that failed to enter the chamber and caused the slide to hang open, one was a WWB and the other was a Blazer. I know that doesn't mean much but he was kind of upset about it, plus he spent almost twice on the ammo as me!!! And we both shot the 9 better than the 40. I'll stick with the 9. He's going to send it to SA to have them look it over.
Tell him to take a pair of pliers and bend open the feed lips a tiny bit on the magazines, allowing the rounds to feed higher. The rounds are probably seated too low, causing some types of ammo (wadcutters and hollowpoints esp.) to get stuck on the feed ramp. Thanks to Ajames, this bit of information saved me a lot of grief.

Here's one way you might be able to tell if this is his problem. Do this before adjusting the magazine. Load a magazine and insert it. Slowly ride the slide forward while watching the chamber, and as soon as it starts to contact the round and push it into the chamber, let the slide go and allowing what little momentum remains to attempt to feed the round. If it gets hung up on the bottom of the feed ramp, open the lips on the top of this magazine. Stand it up on a level surface next to the other loaded magazine for comparison; you should see the round on the adjusted magazine now slightly higher. Repeat the test, it should feed smooth like buttah. If it gets hung up halfway into the chamber, you've opened the lips too much and now its getting stuck on the top surface. Retighten it until you achieve the desired result.
 

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The 9mm is probably more reliable in the sense that the gun is overbuilt for 9mm. Therefore, the gun will likely be more tolerant of out-of spec ammuntion. 9mm over-pressures generally don't cause as many firearm failures as .40 S&W overpressures.

Basically, my opinion is that for most of us gun-ho CCW folks who clean their guns religiously and feed them premium carry ammo, we should be fine. For military use, where the gun is likely to see hostile-environments and sub-par ammo, I'd probably opt for a 9mm.

-T
 

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I used to have both a XD-40 and a XD-9. The XD-40 was so unreliable in feeding that I got rid of it. No problems with the XD-9. Since then I have also tried other firearms in the .40 S&W caliber and have gotten rid of them all, all but HK P2000 suffered from FTF (failure to feed) problems, usualy with case hung up partway in the chamber causing the gun to stay out of battery. I have now divested myself of all .40 guns and will no longer use the caliber. It is my belief that the cartridge design is flawed in its dimensional parameters which leads to feed problems. Stay with the 9mm.
 

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Well, I take back what I said then. I suppose it looks like the 9 is more reliable out of the box than the 40, unless you get lucky and it is made on a good day (like mine thank goodness.) Now, anyone who has had so much trouble with their 40, did you try swapping out the barrel for a 9 to see if that fixes anything?
 

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At the risk of repeating myself, I have XD 40s in both the Service and Tactical models. I have a Glock 22 and a Glock 23, both in .40. I have a CZ40 in .40. Finally, I have a EAA Witness in 10mm with a .40 conversion barrel. The only problem I have ever had with feeding, extraction, etc., in any of these was with reloads in the XDs; increasing the OAL of the rounds cured that. Guess I've just been lucky :?

'Course, for CCW, I don't carry anything that doesn't use a large pistol primer, so it doesn't matter much anyway; the .40s are for my game playing.

No point to this post, really, except to say: YMMV (Your Milage May Vary).
 

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Current owner of 2 XD-40 Tactical's and a XD-40 Service, XD -40 Subcompact is inbound. Several thousand rounds through the three present ones and not one FTF or FTE. I shoot conical nose 180 gr. lead reloads, clean and lube the guns minimally, and I'm extremely pleased with performance and reliability.
 

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i would have to think seriously about purchasing a .40 XD again, after the FTF's i experienced (and that little fear i now cannot get of in the back of my mind). i'd get a 9 in an instant.
 

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Getting to some numbers here, I feel that the 9mm is a round that has the potential to have less FtFeed problems than the 40SW.

I know, there are critics of what I say. However, lets look at this. Have you ever driven a blunt pointed nail into a board? Is there a reason a nail is tapered?

40SW is .424"OD at the base of the case. It is .423OD" at the mouth of the case. That gives a taper of .001" over .850 inches. For the math ionclined, that is a 0.03 degree taper.

Take a 9mm. The base is .394 and the mouth is .380 over a .754 long case. That equates to a 0.53 degree taper.

The 9mm has much more taper to it than the 40. Therefore, I feel that the 9mm has the potential to feed better.

-Dana
 

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Good call, Dana. On the subject of using a 9mm barrel:

It's generally accepted as a bad idea to use conversion barrels for serious purposes. The extractors on .40 guns are not the optimal size (correct me if I'm wrong) to extract 9mms. The swapped barrel system usually works, but is not as bulletproof as a 9mm gun, or even the original .40 gun. A conversion barrel might be good for emergencies when you're out of .40, but why stack the deck against yourself otherwise?

Just buy a 9 and laugh at all the fools throwing tons of money downrange while you plink all day.
 

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This is pretty much a never-ending discussion in reference to the reliability factor.
I've never owned the .40 because I didn't feel the need for its ballistics over the 9mm. With the advancement in 9mm design and the overall cost factor for practice and plinking, I don't feel like I'm at a disadvantage.
 

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The XD9 is more prone to failures to extract because the extractor claw doesn't grip the 9mm rim as well as the 40 extractor does. I have a comparison photo, if someone wants to post it I will email it to you for you to do so.

[email protected]

Do a search. Most, if not all failures to extract are with the XD9.

However, most of the failures to feed are with the XD40s. I'm of the mindset that if a gun jams, simply sell it and get one that proves to be 100% reliable. There are many 100% reliable XDs out there

My XD9sc had 2 failures to extract in 800 rounds.
My XD40sc has had zero malfunctions in 500 rounds shooting dang near every bullet weight and shape I can find.
 
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