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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just interested to see how you guys handle winter carry and gloves. I can see how gloves would be a problem with drawing a firearm. Sometimes I walk the dogs in state parks etc and need to wear gloves or just daily aarons with gloves and a coat on. Thanks
 

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One of the reasons I love my USP...you can have in a pretty thick pair of gloves, and still get your finger in the triggerguard...

I wear a thinner fleece glove when I can, though, or a thin lined leather. They're usually enough for short periods outside.

If you can, get some range time in while wearing gloves, so you know how your grip may or may not be effected.
 

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One of the reasons I love my USP...you can have in a pretty thick pair of gloves, and still get your finger in the triggerguard...
I "funnied" your post because with the USP, one could probably stick all 5 fingers in the trigger guard and still get good trigger control..... :lol:

If you can, get some range time in while wearing gloves, so you know how your grip may or may not be effected.
^ This, diesel lover is GOLD.

If you know you're going to be wearing gloves, you should take the time out to really try them out, to insure that the gloves you pick will not do funny things when it comes time to run your concealed-carry.

What can go wrong?

First and foremost, can you clear clothing well enough with the gloves on? In my mind, taking your gloves off is definitely one option, but it's probably not going to be my preferred option simply because that adds a step to the process, in what is already a fast-developing situation. Additionally, gloves really are to keep your hands warm and your fingers dextrous: some instructors will "stress shoot" by having their students dunk their hands in a cooler-full of ice-water for a few minutes...and anyone who's done that knows how much that level of numbing cold compromises grip and trigger control.

Next, as Cuda66 mentioned, can you fit your gloved finger into the trigger guard? And even if you can, can you successfully actuate the trigger with your gloved finger? This needs to be done at a range, live-fire, with more than just a few rounds simply because all that glove material can do some weird things when it comes to the trigger and what happens to your finger through the trigger path and during the violence of recoil: you won't have to look hard to see posts here and elsewhere where shooters have gotten glove material caught either (more commonly) between the bottom of the trigger and the top portion of the bottom of the trigger guard or even the void between the trigger and the frame at the top - either of these circumstances can cause the trigger to fail to reset, and render the gun unable to fire until remediated.

And speaking of remediation -

Working malfunction reduction with gloves on can present unexpected difficulties as well. Jack Leuba, wrote on M4Carbine.net that he actually had to get a bunch of our nation's greatest ninja-killers to reprogram their pistol manipulations specifically in terms of how they send the slide home after a slide-lock reload, as they were getting glove material stuck in the ejection port with their typical "overhand powerstroke" technique, inducing problems.

That, of-course, brings up reloads - which presents yet another danger: will your chosen gloves increase your risk of pinning glove material between the magazine's base-plate and the backstrap/magwell? You need to be doubly sure of this, if your carry gun has an abbreviated frame which does not extend beyond the heel of your dominant hand.

All things to think about, even before you get to trigger control. :wink:

No joke, I auditioned four pairs of gloves in preparation for the carbine class I took back this past October.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the replys! They were exactly what I intended for when I started this post. I don't usually go for thick gloves unless the weather has been like it has this week, at times in the negativs. My preferred gloves are like winter/cold weather work gloves. They are like insulated mechanics gloves and are usable for work while wearing them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I "funnied" your post because with the USP, one could probably stick all 5 fingers in the trigger guard and still get good trigger control..... :lol:



^ This, diesel lover is GOLD.

If you know you're going to be wearing gloves, you should take the time out to really try them out, to insure that the gloves you pick will not do funny things when it comes time to run your concealed-carry.

What can go wrong?

First and foremost, can you clear clothing well enough with the gloves on? In my mind, taking your gloves off is definitely one option, but it's probably not going to be my preferred option simply because that adds a step to the process, in what is already a fast-developing situation. Additionally, gloves really are to keep your hands warm and your fingers dextrous: some instructors will "stress shoot" by having their students dunk their hands in a cooler-full of ice-water for a few minutes...and anyone who's done that knows how much that level of numbing cold compromises grip and trigger control.

Next, as Cuda66 mentioned, can you fit your gloved finger into the trigger guard? And even if you can, can you successfully actuate the trigger with your gloved finger? This needs to be done at a range, live-fire, with more than just a few rounds simply because all that glove material can do some weird things when it comes to the trigger and what happens to your finger through the trigger path and during the violence of recoil: you won't have to look hard to see posts here and elsewhere where shooters have gotten glove material caught either (more commonly) between the bottom of the trigger and the top portion of the bottom of the trigger guard or even the void between the trigger and the frame at the top - either of these circumstances can cause the trigger to fail to reset, and render the gun unable to fire until remediated.

And speaking of remediation -

Working malfunction reduction with gloves on can present unexpected difficulties as well. Jack Leuba, wrote on M4Carbine.net that he actually had to get a bunch of our nation's greatest ninja-killers to reprogram their pistol manipulations specifically in terms of how they send the slide home after a slide-lock reload, as they were getting glove material stuck in the ejection port with their typical "overhand powerstroke" technique, inducing problems.

That, of-course, brings up reloads - which presents yet another danger: will your chosen gloves increase your risk of pinning glove material between the magazine's base-plate and the backstrap/magwell? You need to be doubly sure of this, if your carry gun has an abbreviated frame which does not extend beyond the heel of your dominant hand.

All things to think about, even before you get to trigger control. :wink:

No joke, I auditioned four pairs of gloves in preparation for the carbine class I took back this past October.....
Never heard of the ice water technique to numb your hands but I really like it! Numb hands in the winter is a reason I like a double stack gun in the colder weather so I can still grip it and shoot it ok. I'm afraid I'm young but my hands get cold easily these last few winters. With a pocket 380 it would be harder to hold, and manipulate the firearm so I completely support carrying a subcompact owb under a hooded sweatshirt with an elastic bottom.

Just as well people are sometimes shocked when I shoot outside in the cold weather and they ask why do you do that but the odds are it won't be 65degs and sunny when somewhat breaks in your house. Some people get so bull headed that when someone does break in they will wake up with a desert eagle in their hand and be ready to rock which is far from the truth.
 

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The other favorite is dish-soap/water (I forget the ratio....:confused:) on your hands, to simulate the lubricity of blood/viscera.

^ Definitely do both of these with a cleared/safe gun, first, so you can get an idea of what to expect. Progress slowly! And remember to not try to catch a gun that's dropped!
 

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I've tried some of my gloves and I can shoot just fine with them on. I don't like the draw and getting my grip there, but once I get it, it's fine. Largely I will just wear my mittens and throw it off if I need to draw.
 

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I have not one but 2 Shepherds trained on command to handle those kind of problems that allows me to watch the entertainment uninterrupted and without getting my hands dirty. Plus it seems the dogs are much more persuadable then a weapon
 

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I have not one but 2 Shepherds trained on command to handle those kind of problems that allows me to watch the entertainment uninterrupted and without getting my hands dirty. Plus it seems the dogs are much more persuadable then a weapon
Lol, definitely gives you time to take off the gloves, unzip the jacket, push the scarf to one side, and ask, "Give up, yet?"
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I have not one but 2 Shepherds trained on command to handle those kind of problems that allows me to watch the entertainment uninterrupted and without getting my hands dirty. Plus it seems the dogs are much more persuadable then a weapon
Haha! Maybe I should be trading in my dogs then? My one lab is much too sweet
 

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I personally use the Mechanix Original Gloves. They're thin, lightweight, and give great dexterity. I use them on the range too so I'm used to drawing, firing and manipulating my gun with them on. Have no problem with them at all. And you can get them on Amazon for around $20, and they do have thinly insulated gloves that are a bit warmer than the Original, but unless its subzero out I find the Originals to be adequate. Highly recommended!
 
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Just interested to see how you guys handle winter carry and gloves. I can see how gloves would be a problem with drawing a firearm. Sometimes I walk the dogs in state parks etc and need to wear gloves or just daily aarons with gloves and a coat on. Thanks
The glove on my strong hand is loose enough to simply "sling" off in an emergency.
 

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Remove glove, draw gun
 

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^ What's the difference between removing a glove and racking the slide to put a round in...time-wise? :wink:

It's not that I think taking off one's glove is a non-starter - rather, I think that those who say that they'll take off their glove need to put things into perspective, particularly if they've also made the assertion that "racking the slide takes too long."


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Haha! Maybe I should be trading in my dogs then? My one lab is much too sweet
^ Hey, I own a Goldendoodle, OK? :lol:


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^ That looks great (I have a glove fetish - one of the reasons why I auditioned 4 pairs of gloves for my first carbine class :lol: - my hands rarely get uncomfortably cold, yet I have a glove for every occasion! :lol:), but all of my boogers are gonna freeze!!!! :lol:
 

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Lol, definitely gives you time to take off the gloves, unzip the jacket, push the scarf to one side, and ask, "Give up, yet?"
Mine don't give themselves up that easy LOL they tend to remain calmer for a bit. Well one my younger one tends to show no signs at all except if you watch close her ears start to shake my black one on the other hand you just never know with her LOL

My old lady now she's still got it but lets my younger one do the chasing she's put on her old lady fat if you know what i mean


And the newer sports car
 

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^ Is the all-black one a GSD, too?

I used to have a nearly-all-black GSD.
Yeps

Believe it or not the original shepherds way back in the days were all black they were classified as the best working dogs and then times and breeders change things for the more appealing to the eye type people. Big difference tho I have seen between my two in training the black one listens on command 1 but isn't snappy like my younger. bite between the two is a big difference to. my black one uses power to take a person down my younger one use flight to knock a person down. Best of both worlds I guess attacking by land and air.

In the end best most lovable dogs I have ever owned right here hand dogs
 
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