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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm sure it's just dirty brass or cheap brass used by them but I went to the range yesterday with a friend and bought my first box of this and my hands (mainly fingers) were green when done.

Since getting my XD-9SC I have just purchased the Federal Premium from Wal-Mart and haven't had this problem.

Is this just cheap brass or the powder they use?
 

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Strange. WWB brass is usually very good stuff. I prefer reloading it most of the time as my results are far more consistent. It could be you had a box that was starting to oxidize due to exposure, thus the green. It could have gotten damp or something before you got it, who knows. Powder wouldn't affect the brass like that, nor make your fingers green. The green is brass oxidation. I've shot thousands of rounds of WWB and never had that happen. I'd get them again.
 

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I agree with the above ^ The first thing I though was oxidation. I use WWB and American Eagle through my XD9sc and have never had a problem with either. Inspect your ammo a little more before shooting it.
 

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Brass and copper that has oxidation will turn your hands green, doesn't matter if it's WWB or any other brand that is not nickel plated. You probably had some ammo that had been in storage for a while and had started to oxidize, maybe stored in a damp place.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The thing is the whole time I was loading it the ammo itself didn't look like it had any oxidation. It looked perfectly clean.

I just noticed it after a while on my fingers from loading mags.

If it isn't obvious on the ammo is there a way to tell if it's starting to oxidize?

Sent from my HTC Evo on Tapatalk.
 

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You might have higher acid in your sweat. A buddy is like that and he etches his prints into brass on hot days. (he should never ever even think about committing a crime!)
 

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You can't "see" oxidation until it creates rust or corrosion.

I used to be into HO scale slot cars. The track would oxidize in storage and reduce the conductivity of the rails. The cars would slow down or have problems. You couldn't see any rust or corrosion on the track rails, but it affected the cars' performance.

Pretty much any copper-jacketed round will turn your fingers green if you handle enough of it. For me, it's a good reminder to wash my hands after I handle ammunition. Cool water and soap will reduce the possibility of lead poisoning. Hot water will open up the pores of your hands - essentially defeating much of the purpose of washing them.
 
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