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I am curious as to what I should look for in a used XD40? Finish? Internals? Wear points? I guess, I am asking, how do I figure out the % condition of the gun?
 

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1. Check out the mag well. One way to easily see if it is well used sort of it to check the mag well. Someone like me who does a lot of compittions and reloads has chewed up mag wells since they are polymer.

2. Check the outside. Lookover the frame and slide. Are there any major scratches or cracks. One to look for is the disassembly lever scratch it is the most common. BAsically some one pushed the disassembly lever into the slide and it has a nice scratch going some of the lenght of the slide. Look for cracks in the polymer although dont confuse them with the molding mars.

3. The rear of the slide. Look at the round plastic piece...the firing pin spring guide. Look at the hole is it round or is it oblong if it is oblong it can be fixed but thats in dindication you status indicator is off and may break soon. It wont impeed the function and can easily be replaced.

4. take the slide of the frame. During this check to see if the grip safety works. check to see if the trigger safety works. If they wont let you see the insides...me personally **** um they obviously did not want the sale.
It is safe to dry fire the pistol.

5. look at the frame. Check out the locking block is it chiped along the front edge where the barrel sits. Is it clean?

6. Look at the rear assembly of the frame. First look at the polymer rails, there should be no wear marks at all infact you should actually be able to see some machine marks. If there is wear or it is chewed up in any way walk away. I have several xd and hs2000`s with several 10`s of thousands of rounds and they dont even show rear frame rail wear. It is an indiaction of some medeling but just trust me walk away.

7. Look below the polymer rear rails at the round holes are they round if so good if not walk away. Check the sear do it look normal or did someone polish it up real nice all over (home trigger job walk away) or obviously took a file to it. The rear of the sear should be even and have a sharp top rear.

8. Lift the slide stop all the way and let it go...it should snap back down with authority.

9. Check the trigger. With the frame only grip the pistol as if to shoot it and give the trigger some slow methodical pulls. It should be smooth and not gritty. With the trigger pulled all the way back push down on the disconect. Thats the hump on the right side push it strait down the sear should pop back up this is good. Then slowly relase the trigger you should hear a small snap thats it reconnecting now pull the trigger the sear should move back down.

10. Check the barrel. First look at the lugs on the bottom are they chewed up? Check the feed ramp is it smooth at least. Too smooth and shiny could be a home polish job and they could have messed it up....this is your call. Now check down the barrel how are the lands and grooves? Is the barrel bulged or at any way odd looking. One way to check the amount of cycling is to look at the front top of the barrel the less wear the less the pistol has bee cycled. dont worry if there is wear they all show alittle even after a few hand cycles.

11. Look at the bottom of the slide push in the firing pin saftey the oval object under the slide. While the safty is pushed in push the firing pin forward. then let the safety go. The safety should be holding the firing pin forward (this lets you know the safety`s spring is strong enough) now while the firing pin is forward look at the breech face is the tip of the firing pin sticking out? If so good its all in there.

12. look at the top of the slide. with your finger lift up the loaded chamber indicator and let it snap back down it should go back down with no problems. Now look further back on the slide at the hole. Inside is a roll pin that is in the shape of the letter"C" the more it is all chewed up means some one has had the slide appart.

13. Look at the sights there are centering lines on both the front and rear do you see all four lines. If not the sights are not centered a consideration if you dont have a punch or the time/knowhow to fix it. Also an indication that A. an amuturer put them on or b. the sights are loose and will need some lock tight so they dont move.

14. Look at the underside again at the extractor. Look at the claw of the extractor is there alot of gunk in the claw? It should be clean. Is the claw chipped thats a bad thing. Look allong the length of the extracot under it are there scratches? If so it means some one tryed to take it out.

I could go on and on but this should more than get you into trouble.
 

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(barrel) "Too smooth and shiny could be a home polish job and they could have messed it up....this is your call."

James, could you maybe clarify this a bit more. My barrel feedramp is smooth and shiny, the result of careful polishing with a Dremel, felt tip, and Flitz polish. But that's all I did. Is there such a thing as too much polishing? My barrel feeds and fires perfectly. I have been told that polishing does effect the life of the barrel - equivalent to firing thousands of rounds through it but frankly, I think that's BS and that I will wear-out long before the gun. Thanks.
 

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Too much polishing? Definitely. If they change the shape of the feedramp, or make it cut into the chamber more, that's all bad news.

I would never take a dremel to my feed ramp. Eezox and a cleaning cloth has always done a good job of keeping it silky smooth.
 

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[TASF said:
Overkill]Too much polishing? Definitely. If they change the shape of the feedramp, or make it cut into the chamber more, that's all bad news.

I would never take a dremel to my feed ramp. Eezox and a cleaning cloth has always done a good job of keeping it silky smooth.
'Don't necessarily agree providing you don't go overboard. And if you have a Kel-tec P3AT it is absolute essential to ensure reliability :) . Those guns (barrels) that I have polished continue to perform perfectly after hundreds and hundreds of fired rounds. To me that's proof enough that nothing was done wrong. Am I missing something? I'd like to hear from others especially James. Thanks.

By the way, when I was having trouble with feeding (turned out to be the reloads I was making) in my EFK Firestar barrel (Glock36), I was TOLD by EFK to polish the feedramp, chamber and hood.
 

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Dremmel tool have ruined more firearms than anything eles....I was talking with some of SA`s custom shop guys and they told me even Rob Leatham thought he was a smith and has messed up pistols with a dremel tool.

Yea changing the shape of the feedramp, uneven polishing sometimes you polish the middle too much and its wavy. Too much off the top will make an unsupported chamber....I think a member here did that a while back and had a case rupture on him.

Really if its smooth it means some one has attempted some type of gunsmithing on the pistol.
Some gunsmithing could mean there is other gunsmithing done. It may be good or bad.
If you know that something has or has not been done the more you know about a pistol and if you should buy it. It just means look out for some gunsmithing not everyone does smart things. In 1911`s you can polish too much easilly and mess things up.
 

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ajamesp51 said:
Dremmel tool have ruined more firearms than anything eles....I was talking with some of SA`s custom shop guys and they told me even Rob Leatham thought he was a smith and has messed up pistols with a dremel tool.

Yea changing the shape of the feedramp, uneven polishing sometimes you polish the middle too much and its wavy. Too much off the top will make an unsupported chamber....I think a member here did that a while back and had a case rupture on him.

Really if its smooth it means some one has attempted some type of gunsmithing on the pistol.
Some gunsmithing could mean there is other gunsmithing done. It may be good or bad.
If you know that something has or has not been done the more you know about a pistol and if you should buy it. It just means look out for some gunsmithing not everyone does smart things. In 1911`s you can polish too much easilly and mess things up.
Thanks James. I have great respect for your judgment. So let's assume you have polished your barrel, you have fired hundreds and hundreds of rounds through it since and it's performed perfectly. Would you then say that the polishing had no negative effect - feeding, safety or otherwise? I mean how do you measure performance or lack of? To say polishing is unwise, perhaps yes, perhaps no. Just what exactly is the determinator? That's what I want to know. Wouldn't a sign of over-polishing be a failure of some kind and more than likely occur within several hundred rounds of firing? I mean at what point do you say, yeah I polished my barrel and all is well? Or d--n, did I screw things up! Thanks. Keep in mind a lot of folks polish their barrels and like me, experience no problems.

I apologize if I sound like an attorney here - I am just try to quantify things and yes, I do value your opinion.
 

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How about this if it aint broke why fix it? If it is broke fix it until it is fixed. Really why I said to look out for it is to ask your self if it has a polished feedramp did the pistol have a history of unreliability? Then ask your self if the pistol had no problems did they fix something that did not need to be fixed and want to get rid of it. At gunshows people are trying to make money at your cost.

Now I will say this I am the type of person and I suspect that you are as well that want the full potentual out of their equipment. I have polished my ramps why becuase I enjoy doing it and as satetd maximize it to the fullest. You said that your pistol runs flawless with the polish you did a good job....but if you try to sell your pistol dont be offended if you get asked about it becuase they dont know if you knew what you were doing.
 

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I like this discussion more people will read this and may learn something.
I am interested in what others think or if anyone has been burned with a "smithed" gun.
 

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I passed up a clearly "smithed" XD40 sub. Someone clearly had feeding problems, dremelled the crap out of everything they could think of, and gave up on it. The store insisted "That's how it's supposed to be." For $380. Right. My ass.

They had bugared up the slide and the feed ramp. Feed ramp had been so ground down that it was sharp on the sides, it was so thin. But boy, it sure was shiny and pretty.
 

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ajamesp51 said:
How about this if it aint broke why fix it? If it is broke fix it until it is fixed. Really why I said to look out for it is to ask your self if it has a polished feedramp did the pistol have a history of unreliability? Then ask your self if the pistol had no problems did they fix something that did not need to be fixed and want to get rid of it. At gunshows people are trying to make money at your cost.

Now I will say this I am the type of person and I suspect that you are as well that want the full potentual out of their equipment. I have polished my ramps why becuase I enjoy doing it and as satetd maximize it to the fullest. You said that your pistol runs flawless with the polish you did a good job....but if you try to sell your pistol dont be offended if you get asked about it becuase they dont know if you knew what you were doing.
Thanks James. Your points are well-taken. But SELL my XD?! Surely you jest! :shock:

Only one thing I would add to this, and I mentioned this to you in a private message but I'll share it with the troops, is that the degree of shine is not necessarily an indicator of how much polishing was done but what polishing media was used. Non-abraisive Flitz paste really puts a shine on metal and it doesn't take much effort. More so than the Dremel polishing compound. My point is that a mirror shine accomplished with Flitz does not necessarily mean that the barrel underwent extreme polishing or sanding or worst case, filing. Nevertheless, James is correct in that a shiny feedramp should (but not always) cause a light bulb to go off warning you of potential probelms with a used gun. Best if the seller will allow, is to have a competent gunsmith take a look at it before you buy (same advice applies to buying a used car - let a qualified mechanic look it over) if you don't feel comfortable making a determination on your own.
 

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There is a difference between polishing and sanding and grinding away material. I polished mine but didn't change the geometry or shape.
 

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robz71lm7 said:
There is a difference between polishing and sanding and grinding away material. I polished mine but didn't change the geometry or shape.
That's pretty much where I am coming from too.
 

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Well, the problem is...

A: If someone has polished the feed ramp, they probably were experiencing feed problems.
B: There's no real way to know whether they just polished it or actually removed significant amounts of material, unless you happen to have your barrel handy.
C: If it's used and has a low round count, and the feed ramp is modified in any way, it's likely that the reason they got rid of it was because it just would not feed, no matter what modifications they made. In which case, I also assume they tried to do more than just lightly polish the feed ramp. Think about what kind of frustration it would take for you to sell off your XD instead of sending it in to Springfield.

A polished feed ramp doesn't immediately make me go "AYeeeeeee!! RIP OFF!", but it's a sign that they were having some problems, and probably tried to fix it themselves, which might mean the problem still exists or that they created some problems of their own. If I found a $350 subcompact with a polished feedramp that looked to be otherwise fine, I'd still spring for it. If I had the money.

You don't look at something and say "Well, this is how it could be ok..." you look at it and try to predict what possible problems it could cause, and if that's worth it to you. What it boils down to is, it's a personal decision involving the perceived risks and benefits, just like pretty much every other decision on the planet.
 

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[TASF]Overkill said:
Well, the problem is...

A: If someone has polished the feed ramp, they probably were experiencing feed problems.
B: There's no real way to know whether they just polished it or actually removed significant amounts of material, unless you happen to have your barrel handy.
C: If it's used and has a low round count, and the feed ramp is modified in any way, it's likely that the reason they got rid of it was because it just would not feed, no matter what modifications they made. In which case, I also assume they tried to do more than just lightly polish the feed ramp.

A. "Probably?" Not necessarily. See James' post above. How many XDs actually have feed problems? We're not talking about a Keltec P3AT here or a 1911 that won't feed hollowpoints (quite common).

B. True if you are considering buying the gun (cuz you are right, you don't know) but it doesn't address the issue of whether polishing itself is inherently a bad practice if done in moderaton and with common sense. We are not talking about grinding or sanding.

C. Conjecture. I have gotten rid of guns simply because I've tired of them not because of any problems. That's the fun of gun ownership. But to rule things out, best if you can test fire. Better yet, if you bring along a buddy who may have more experience in these things.
 
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