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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,
this is sort of a range report but i've got a question too. I went to the range yesterday and put 100 rounds of wwb thru my xd-9 tactical(this is the second time i've shot it since I got it back in November) and my groups are not very tight, I've tried some dry firing before yesterday and I think I'm doing well, but i'd like to know if its just my inexperience with shooting? The weird thing was there was another guy there who had a 357 mag ruger da revolver(which i liked alot), and he let me shoot it...at 7-10 yards i had a nice 3-4" group(this is the best i had ever shot) I shot the pistol single action style with the hammer already cocked and the trigger throw very short(which I really liked) Could that be whats causing me to have very large groups with my xd(like 5-6-7" groups with a few strays here and there), from the longer trigger travel that i'm not quite accustomed to yet? One thing one of workers suggested was putting something on the slide and to dry fire it and make sure the item on the slide doesn't move. Any other sugestions you guys have other than alot more time shooting or dry firing?

on a positive note my xd is 220 rounds in with no problems at all except for some very slight surface rust on the slide from where i touched it with fingers that were damp(which the silicon rag cured quickly). Also this was the first time shooting with the wwb and I liked it, although I could tell it was a bit more dirty than what i first put thru the gun(gold dots and regular federal), thanks in advance for any tips you guys have..i'm looking forward to getting back to the range soon.

Thanks
Gray
 

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Honestly it sounds like with more practice you'll be heading in the right direction. It's been said a zillion times, and it's absolutely true, that trigger control is a big factor. Once you get good at squeezing the trigger without disturbing the gun, your groups will get much tighter. From there it's just a matter of holding the sights on the target while you squeeze the trigger.

Hope that helps,

Scott
 

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One of the things that you might find is that you're squeezing your whole hand rather than isolating your trigger finger. A smooth press to the rear is all it takes, and each shot should come somewhat as a surprise.

When I went through training, the instructors did the coolest thing with us:

We stood there, pointed in, sights lined up, focused intently on the front sight and not the target, with our fingers having taken up the slack to the break point in the trigger pull. They checked out sight picture by placing a magazine across the top of the rear sight so you could see if you were too high or low. Then, with our finger on the trigger, they put their finger over ours and actually were the ones that pulled the trigger. They didn't even look downrange - all we had to do was to keep the sights aligned.

Every single person put a shot in the center at 7 meters repeatedly when the instructors did this.

It just proved, without a doubt, how important trigger control is. It also didn't let you anticipate the shot - you had no idea when it was going off.

It was just eerie as to how well that excercise worked.

- Mike
 
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