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I see a wide range of bench vises out there from the cheap Harbor Freight to the $1,000 mega vise. I also see the Wheeler products like the AR Armorers Professional Kit for $179.

The vise would be used to install upgrades to my current AR and eventually build an AR or ten. I don't have a vise at the moment.

Any suggestions?

I'd be fine with spending a couple hundred dollars, but not if it's overkill.
 

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I've built a bunch of ARs. You don't need a special vise. I'm using a pretty heavy-duty bench vise that I bought @ Sam's for about $40. (maybe less) I don't even bolt the vise down. I just secure the vise to the bench with a couple of C clamps.
 

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yep, doesn't need to be uber... just should be deep enough and wide enough to hold your work. I actually use a bench for my cleaning work to. i use a rag to buffer the metals, and clamp down on the bottom rail. I separate the upper/lower and can really be efficient and through and not have to worry about it rolling all over the place.
 

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I've got a little 4" vise bolted to my workbench that I've used for installing/removing barrels. It worked.

Now, am I saying that it's the best choice? No, far from it. I'm just demonstrating that it doesn't take a whole lotta vise to get it done. I think a 5" vise would be just fine for what you want to do, and still be versatile enough to be useful.
 

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Guys can someone recommend a bench that will go in an apartment that I can clamp the above vise to ?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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I just use a 6 foot long rectangular folding table as my desk/bench in my apartment. I took a 2x12 that was 8 foot long and laid 2 24" second side by side on the bottom and then ran the other 2 perpendicular and used 2.5" screws to hold then together. I have my vice, press, and case trimmer mounted to it and just put an ammo can fill of brass on it when I use it. Cost my $15 and can get put in the closet when not in use.

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Smooth jaws. The vise will need to be bolted to a sturdy work bench. At least 5 inches wide. I am assuming you will be vising up the barrel in the appropriate barrel vise jaws made for that purpose padded with a hunk of indoor, outdoor carpet.

The barrel will require a lot of vise torque to properly secure it while doing that always pesky barrel torquing when the barrel is locked down and the upper receiver floats on the end of the barrel while torquing it to around 40-42 pounds. Dry.

Torque wrench required. We used a common click type.

Aligning the gas tube using the OEM type barrel nut will take time. Usually you will have to install and remove the barrel and dress the end of the upper receiver slightly removing material so the gas tube lines up EXACTLY. All with 40-42 pounds torque.

This is by far the most time intensive part of the AR15 build. Sometimes that pesky barrel will have to be removed and reinstalled several times to get everything correct. A stripped carrier with key should not touch the gas tube at all. Hope this helps.

Do not bend the gas tube. Getting it all right takes time and experience. You can do it. It is fun.

HB of CJ (old coot) hundreds of AR builds.
 

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Smooth jaws. The vise will need to be bolted to a sturdy work bench. At least 5 inches wide. I am assuming you will be vising up the barrel in the appropriate barrel vise jaws made for that purpose padded with a hunk of indoor, outdoor carpet.

The barrel will require a lot of vise torque to properly secure it while doing that always pesky barrel torquing when the barrel is locked down and the upper receiver floats on the end of the barrel while torquing it to around 40-42 pounds. Dry.

Torque wrench required. We used a common click type.

Aligning the gas tube using the OEM type barrel nut will take time. Usually you will have to install and remove the barrel and dress the end of the upper receiver slightly removing material so the gas tube lines up EXACTLY. All with 40-42 pounds torque.

This is by far the most time intensive part of the AR15 build. Sometimes that pesky barrel will have to be removed and reinstalled several times to get everything correct. A stripped carrier with key should not touch the gas tube at all. Hope this helps.

Do not bend the gas tube. Getting it all right takes time and experience. You can do it. It is fun.

HB of CJ (old coot) hundreds of AR builds.
I suppose that's why clamshell vice clamps for upper receivers are so desirable! ;) You don't clamp the barrel; you clamp the upper. 8)
 

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Title says it. Doing it the wrong way will over time, (many builds) will eventually crack a upper receiver. It is not designed to be clamped...the barrel is. Also the heavy barrel hanging out over a secured upper receiver will place undue strain on the threads, resulting in a non proper torquing.

However... having said this, if the barrel could somehow be properly supported during the torquing so as not to stress that weak threaded area of the upper receiver end, then perhaps doing it wrong MAY IN FACT make it right. Dunno. Even then the barrel would not be evenly torqued. Sad but true.

Clear as mud. Hope this helps. Just passing stuff forward. HB of CJ (old coot) hundreds of AR builds.
 

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that's a lot of stress on that extension pin HB... you're basically screwing a loose nut into a loose shaft, with nothing but that pin keeping them in place. without that pin... well good luck getting anything done. the upper will just rotate with the barrel nut.

how do you account for this?
 
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