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What are the things you look for that makes a gun good quality? Please be careful when it comes to price because sometimes you pay more for the name itself than you do for the actual gun (such as Sig, HK). Are there some guns that are generally "low" or "medium" priced that you consider great quality? Do you even consider the price? Are there particular brands and models out there that you prefer, and why? For those who have spent a long time around guns, what changes have you seen, both good and bad, over time? What factors have shaped the way you look at guns in terms of value, quality, accuracy, etc.? Do you think that today's $400-500-ish guns have improved significantly to the point where paying anything more is not necessary now?

It seems like a lot of people are buying now based on value (along with accuracy, quality, price, and reliability). Glocks, Rugers, S&W's, and Springfield's (even if they are a bit more expensive) newest polymers are strong sellers. Do you think these days people are getting more for what they are paying for now compared to the past? Less? The same? Some guns like the SR9, XDm, M&P, and even the FNX offer a lot of features for what you pay for, and their quality isn't bad either. Do you agree? It seems a lot has changed since 2000, and not just with handguns either.
 

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Materials. fit, finish, and design I don't think guns of today are better then 40 years ago. Just a lot more choice. if looking at hours worked average to buy many of the guns of today are a good buy. what today's guns don't have is finish. the the cost of hand finishing is just to high for other then high end guns. Of course this is IMO
 

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Gun that goes bang. Every time. Without fail.
 

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Reliability. Everything else is just a plus.
 

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Reliability, followed by trigger and ergonomics are my major priorities when looking at a pistol. Of course price is a factor but I do not think that it is a concrete indication of reliability now days.

Lets focus on this

Do you think that today's $400-500-ish guns have improved significantly to the point where paying anything more is not necessary now?
Simply put, yes, I do. Whether you call them mid-range, barely above entry level, or just flat out plastic crap, the most common pistols in the $5-600 range (Glock, M&P, XDm) will fulfill the needs of most people just as well as a $800k H&K P30 (god how I lust after it) or a $8K custom 1911. Anything above and beyond a Glock, M&P or XDm (what I refer to as the "Big 3") is entering into the realm of wants, not need.

Does a P30 make the average person shoot better in the range that most would use a handgun (i.e less than 25 yards). Maybe, but I highly doubt it. Is a Sig p226 X5 more reliable than a Glock? Once again not likely. You may make the case that the Sig will last long enough to pass on to your grandkids but lets face it, in 60 years there is bound to be something better in one way or another. How about that $8k custom 1911 that sends gun aficionados running for their drool buckets? Does it do anything better than a XDm in the hands of your average shooter? Hardly.

In the short time I have been shooting I have learned quite a bit and one thing that I find amusing is how much gun ownership is like, in some ways, building a custom PC for video games. The last rig I built (the one I'm currently typing this on), cost me approximately $1700 for the tower and all the wonderful silicon bits inside. It was a glorious day when the UPS guy showed up with boxes and boxes of goodies just waiting to be pieced together into a new computer. Now I could have built a PC worthy enough to launch Skynet but for my needs what I have is more than capable of running any game out right now with all the eye candy turned up for full glory.

The point of that little nugget of geek preceding this paragraph is that there are those who are perfectly willing to spend $1k on an Intel 990X processor alone to place in their gaming rigs. $400 for some tricked out, hyper fast ram is only a problem because there isn't something better and more expensive. Motherboards that cost less than $500 need not apply. Thousands and thousands are spent on a computer in the hopes of having the very best possible. And what do they get in return for such a large investment? Faster boot times and frames per second. So a person like me has to wait a few seconds longer to boot up or load a game and instead of getting 115 FPS on something like Call of Duty, I get 95FPS.

The point is that you get into an area of diminishing returns and are left wondering exactly what it is you got for your money. Is a $8k custom 1911 8 times the gun that a $1k SA 1911 is? Not even close. Similarly, is a $1k Sig twice the gun that a $500 Glock is? If you think so, you might have to accept the fact that you are compensating for something. Would I love to have one example of every pistol out there that is over $700? Of course! But I would have to be filthy rich to be able to justify it to myself because the fact of the matter is you are paying a lot of money for something that will not show a significant return on your investment when compared to your run of the mill Glock.

Expensive guns are like expensive cars. They are very much a "look at me" item. If you took Michael Schumacher and placed his narrow ass in the seat of a Corvette Z06 at Streets of Willow racetrack, his lap times wouldn't be much different than those he would achieve in a Ferrari 360 Modena. However, people will flock to drool over the hot Italian and barely give the Vette a second glance. Same thing applies with guns it would seem.
 

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The same factors we consider when buying a car.

Reliability... reputable brand with a solid history, low incidence of failures or problems

Customer Service... you know never know when you need them, ease of dealing with arms maker and their ability to respond to problems or inquiries

Value... competitively priced, comes with more standard features and accessories
 

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" What factors do you consider that make a gun good quality?"

I just look to see if "Glock" appears anywhere on the gun. If I find "Glock", then I know I'm holding a quality firearm! :p
 

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Ergonomics are the most important thing to me. I notice when I am at the gun show or in a shop the guns that feel best in my hands are the ones that I want to buy. I usually notice it with AR's that just because it has a good grip and a good forend I start falling in love. I know those can be changed but it makes a big difference.
 

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Mongo like big gun go bang!
Whats wrong with big guns that go bang? Shooting something twice because you have to is dumb... Shooting something twice because you want to prove you can put 2 bullets in one hole... hehehe, that's just fun.:cool:
 

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What I look for in a gun:

Reliability: I can count on it shooting every time; no jams, misfeeds, light strikes.

Accuracy: it hits what I point it at out to a fair distance (dependent on the gun's intended use).

Durability: my kids' kids will be able to shoot it (or my kids will be able to shoot it if it came from my dad).


Not every gun that I buy costs more than $600, but I certainly think that those guns have a place. It's hard to find a good quality (according to my 3 measures listed above) revolver under 500 bucks.
 

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The same factors we consider when buying a car.

Reliability... reputable brand with a solid history, low incidence of failures or problems
Customer Service... you know never know when you need them, ease of dealing with arms maker and their ability to respond to problems or inquiries
Value... competitively priced, comes with more standard features and accessories
Then, after that...
Ergonomics... but during shooting. I've held a bunch of pistols that felt great at the counter, but didn't feel at all comfortable to shoot... Whether it be due to trigger pull, the grip during presentation and during recoil and other factors.

While the Kimbers and such shoot like a dream, I feel there are quite a few $400 - $600 range pistols that fit my need.

I won't buy any "New" (1st Year on the market) pistols, simply because I don't want to be Ruger's (or anyone's) Guinna-pig.

Now-a-days, everyone is "borrowing" everyone else's designs and trying to make them just a bit better. The LCP & LC9 are Kel-Tec Copies. The SR9c seems to be a Glock copy. There's not much that's really NEW, so it's down to who can do it a bit better for less.
 

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one I can trust my life and family members life on other than that it all boils down to reliablity! I chose XD because of the reviews and extra safety options over the glock but glock would of been my next choice this is Just my opinon
 

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1) Brands with reputations for dependability.
2) The better design, most simple is the easiest to fix. Better metal will make a
better gun, for wear and failure from stresses involved.
3) A gun that has been made for twenty years or has been copied over and over.
4) Balance and fit.
 
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