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How did you quit smoking?

  • Cold Turkey

  • Patch

  • Gum

  • Ziaban "Welbutrin"

  • Other Please describe

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Discussion Starter #1
It's time I turn 33 today and my habit has gotten out of control :evil:
Smoking 1-1.75 packs a day :shock: .
I don't belive I can do cold turkey.I tried welbutrian(Ziban)seemend to really piss me off.
I Have realized I smoke to much and could afford more weaponry if I quit.
All advise will be apprciated.
 

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Rob,

I have never been a smoker, hate the smell. That said, I have many friends who've quit. They all say the same thing. To quit, you need to take the commitment seriously. Patches are enablers, however, your mind is what you need to focus on. If you put your mind to it, you can do it cold turkey. Set your mind at a level where failure is not an option. If you fail yourself, you are failing your family and friends too. No one likes to fail their loved ones.

Good luck. You have all of our support!

Scott

PS: Do you need me to show you how much money you will save in a year's time. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Old School said:
Rob,

I have never been a smoker, hate the smell. That said, I have many friends who've quit. They all say the same thing. To quit, you need to take the commitment seriously. Patches are enablers, however, your mind is what you need to focus on. If you put your mind to it, you can do it cold turkey. Set your mind at a level where failure is not an option. If you fail yourself, you are failing your family and friends too. No one likes to fail their loved ones.

Good luck. You have all of our support!

Scott

PS: Do you need me to show you how much money you will save in a year's time. :)
Thanks Scott I appreciate that after losing my Dad a couple years ago I need to do this .I have been working on making a plan .I figure if I put my mind to it with a nice reward still need a 1911 and a Shotgun.I will be able to succeed. Easy figure 1800 per year allot I could easily afford a nice race gun with that kinda change
 

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I got to the point where I was disgusted in myself for smoking. I had wanted to quit for a long time but I knew until the time was right and I was ready mentally I would never be able to do it. I psyched myself up for it for along time until one day when I was out of cigs and getting ready to go to the store, I just decided I didn't want them anymore. I didn't buy them ever again. It was the hardest thing I have ever done but also one of the best decisions I have ever made. Good luck.
 

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R/T....

As a currently licensed (although semi-retired) Respiratory Therapist, the only real way to quit smoking is to QUIT! In other words, you have to be disgusted enough with yourself for smoking, and you have to be disgusted enough in the future prospects if you don't quit, before you will ever be successful. Most males can go cold turkey due to our innate "maleness" of making up our mind and then doing something. Most females attach a social value, psychological and emotional well-being to smoking and have a much harder time.

This being said, smoking effects the chemical receptors in your brain much the way cocaine does and therefore you need to be prepared for the little attacks to happen...although you have quit, you will find some things that you associate "fondly" with smoking and you will have that familar urge to pick up and smoke....that urge may well become an overriding thought for a few minutes and you will have to plan on actively engaging in something that will take you mind off the thought.

Good luck on your efforts. My suggestion for many of my former patients was to put into a jar, daily, the amount you would have spent on smoking. Don't touch it for a year. Spend what is there after the year on YOURSELF ONLY. Not a wife, g/f, the neighbor, etc. It is YOUR reward for quitting. Succumbing to the urge to light up is not a failure given that the addictive qualities of cigarettes are so strong, but use that lapse as more resolve not to let it happen again and you WILL be ultimately successful.

I would also urge you to have a pulmonary function test done now so that you can see the percentage of damage already done to your lungs. Some of the damage will be repairable while some is permanent. This will allow you to come back a year or two from now and see how much you have improved due to your being a newly found non-smoker.

If I can ever be of help to you send a PM.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I like that idea and have decided tonight. bieng I have turned 33 today is the day. I was planning to put it of till new years prepare myself and stuff.
But this is the day your support will surely get me threw.
I expect I will suceed .
I need this I want this and I will be better for it.
Thanks
Rob 8)
 

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August 7, 1983, 7:10pm COLD turkey.

Actually, I paid $7.00 to attend a Seventh Day Adventist quit smoking class, and I am too stingy to waste that money. :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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I'm with your RTPerformance, I actually just slapped a patch on my arm this afternoon.

I really hate spending the money and the stigmatism I get for smoking.

I've done it before, but I went back. The main thing to remember is the nicotine only stays in your system for a few days and like any other addiction YOU CAN NEVER GO BACK!

Last time I had good luck with Thursday Plantation Tea Tree Oil Chewing sticks. They really helped me with the oral fixation part of quitting.
PM me if you need any moral support.
 

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I watched my father die from lung cancer, he smoked most of his life. That stopped me for a year, but I started again. Then I get bronchitis. I lit up a cigarette, hacked up blood for 15 minutes. Haven't smoked since, that was January, 1990.

Nicotine is an addictive drug with the power of heroin. It's a TOUGH habit to break, but it can be done. Personally, I think cold turkey is the way to go, but do whatever you need to, IT CAN BE DONE!!!
 

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I was a pallbearer for a coworker who died from lung cancer. She had asked me several times after she got sick to quit smoking for my boys. I saw her 3 year old grandson crying at her funeral and decided she was right.

After 48 hours without nicotine, the body's cravings are broken. It is the mental desire that is difficult to overcome. It has been 7 years, and I still feel the desire for one after a good meal.

Good luck. The money you save in one year could buy you some pretty sweet hardware. When I bought my XD-9, my in-laws ragged on me for spending so much money (to them) on a gun. I had them add up what they spent each year on smokes, told them I just spent all my cigarette money at one time, in one place and still had something to show for it besides smelly fingers, stained teeth and dirty ashtrays.
 

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okgr8outdrs said:
After 48 hours without nicotine, the body's cravings are broken. It is the mental desire that is difficult to overcome. It has been 7 years, and I still feel the desire for one after a good meal.

I should clarify that I was a tobbaco user, if it was tobacco, I used it. I chewed, dipped, stuffed, smoked cigar, pipes (had a custom blend that is still sold by that tobacconist) and cigarettes. I smoked less than half a pack of cigarettes per day, but went through a lot of the other stuff.

I still want one after a big meal, and still miss the chaw while I'm working.

My late wife smoked about 4 packs a day, my alarm clock in the morning was her Zippo opening, which happened before she got all the way out of bed. She would light her first and then sit and puff for a minute, then she would leave that one in the ashtray while she went in the bathroom, where she would light another, and then she would work back and forth between bedroom and bathroom smoking both and lighting new as needed.

She quit the same night I did, she was worried about my health, form the chewing, so we made a pact to quit together. She died of lung cancer that had metastasized to her brain, and just about every other organ in her body, on February 7, 1993 at 7:19pm, 9 years 6 months 28 days and 9 minutes after quitting, and she still wanted one.

After I quit I started chewing Trident Sugarless Cinnamon gum, and after about 6 months I went to see my dentist. He went berserk on me, saying I was killing myself with the chewing (tobacco) because I had Leukoplakia (pre-cancerous lesions) all over the inside of my mouth.

I pointed out to him that, since we had hunted together every deer season for the previous many years, he had to know that I chewed and that he had never noticed any problems before, and that I had quit the previous August. Not knowing exactly what was causing the breakout, we decided I should change gums. I tried several other sugarless gums with no change, and then went to Dubble Bubble Bubble Gum (with sugar) and the condition cleared up. I am apparantly somewhat sensitive to whatever the sweetener is in sugarless gum.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Wow I am going to do this thank you so much for shareing.

Buy the way My DAD died if heart failure due to Nicotine and caffine.
Per the docters He had open heart surgery and a month stay about a year before he passed and made it a year smoke free
 

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As a smoker myself the best advice I can give you is don't listen to anyone who has never smoked. They don't know jack crap. They can give you support. But if you need that you'll never make it. You have to be able to support yourself in your quest to quit. You can't depend on anyone else but yourself. It's gonna take 100% on your part. Cold turkey. Your on your own dude. Best of luck.
 

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It was not easy, the key to being able to quit is simply you have to want to quit. If your saying I miss smoking, I like smoking, it will never work youll break down and sneak one.
 

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I prepared myself by picking a date in the future. I don't even remember what it was anymore....it was almost 30 years ago.

But I do remember that I gave myself several months to think about it. Every day during that period I would think about how I was going to be a non-smoker. Every time I lit a cigarette I thought about it.

I dreamed about it. It really became part of my life. I was going to be a non-smoker come that special day.

And when the day arrived, I guess my subconscious and every part of me was ready. I had stopped and failed to keep off cigarettes a number of times prior to that. Once I had stopped for about 8 or 9 months, but I still went back.

Now I absolutely can't tolerate the smell of cigarette smoke. I guess that is an individual thing. Jim Longley quit a long time ago and he says he still has cravings.

Yesterday I was at a friend's house for Thanksgiving and after we ate (12 people) we all went into his media room to watch football. A few people lit up and I had to leave the room.

Quiting smoking IS a very difficult thing. As OEFM said, it's pretty much impossible for non smokers to conceive of how hard it is to stop. But there are ways. What I did worked for me. Others have quit spur of the moment. Others have found the Patch and/or nicotine gum to work.

No matter what method, making the effort to stop is something that you have to want to do badly enough.

What is truly amazing to me is how many young people START smoking these days. With all the anti-smoking campaigns....even from the tobacco companies....with the exorbitant price of cigarettes.....with all the restrictions of where smoking is permitted, it seems like to START smoking in this day and age is....well, I don't know what motivates anyone.

When I was a kid, we could smoke at lunch in high school (outside). In college smoking in the classrooms was allowed. Any seat on an airplane was OK to smoke.

But now? It seems like a big hassle. No more cigarette machines, can't even smoke in most bars in Florida.

When I go to Asia I am amazed at how many Asians and Europeans smoke. I guess America is ahead of the curve in being anti-tobacco, which is pretty ironic since we originated it.

Peace,
D.
 

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You gotta get your head right first.

I been quit about 6 & 1/2 years.

I tried patches and Wellbutrin at one time or another and they didn't help that much.

You have to make your mind up that the smokes are killing you. Then you have to make your mind up to quit.

Lay them down and walk away. That's all you can do.

Good Luck.

bd
 

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On May 1st, third shift at work, 1977; I said to myself and to everyone I knew; "I will never smoke another cigarette for the rest of my life."

It worked.


Tom
 

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I quit smokeing not to long ago for about the 2nd or 3rd time :? I quit slowly by taking the temporary habit of smokeless tobacco (skoal). I eventually tapered off the cigs and was dipping skoal regularly. after a couple of weeks I tapered off the skoal. The skoal was easy to get off of since I didnt really form a long term habit. Now cig smoke makes me sick to my stomach.
 
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