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Many of you newer folk (and perhaps even some of the not-so-new) may not know me. I'm one of the old guys. One of the very old. In fact, I was just the 43rd person to join this forum back in March of 2001. So it was with great dismay that I learned what the hacker did to our forum. Wanting to help in some way, I dug my way back through the internet and found my original range report on the HS2000. It was a side-by-side comparison with a friend's Glock 17 that I first posted on the old Makarov forum in January 2001, shortly after I purchased my Gen 1 for the paltry sum of $269. She now has over 30k rounds through her with only two hiccups (two stovepipes when a friend's girlfriend limpwristed it while we were teaching her how to shoot). She's even still on the original recoil spring (ummm... the HS2000, not the girlfriend ;) ).

I believe that post to be the very first detailed HS2000 range report ever found on the internet. I later gave it to Kermee and he posted it here. Hopefully, some of you will find it interesting. It appears in its entirety below:


Okay folks, I know some of you have been eagerly awaiting this report. Well, I can sum up the performance of the HS2000 with just two words: Yee. Haw. It’s been more than 12 hours since I hit the range and I’m still smiling. Wish I were going again tomorrow. And if I were going to add another word to my description list of this pistol, it would be “Bargain”. No, make that “Steal”. This is one fine pistol, regardless of price. At well under $300, well... you get the picture. This is a bit long, but I wanted to be as thorough as possible, since I know many of you are contemplating the purchase of this pistol. First, a quick review of its features: 9mm; polymer frame; 22 oz. empty weight; striker fired; steel slide with Tenifer-type finish; 10rd capacity chrome mags (15rd for LEOs); three-dot dovetailed sights; loaded chamber indicator; cocked indicator; tactical rails; trigger-safety (Glock-type); grip safety (1911 type); out of battery safety; stand-off device (for contact shots); and the ability to shoot under water. For comparison purposes at the range today, a friend brought along his Glock 17. I know some of you are hoping I’ll say that the HS2000 kicked the Glock’s butt. It didn’t. The Glock wasn’t there as a competitor, to see if the HS2000 could out-Glock a Glock. Rather, it was there as a benchmark. Like them or not, Glocks have proven over time to be highly durable, reliable and accurate firearms. Many of us dislike their ergonomics and call them Tupperware, but that’s personal preference. Any firearm that approaches the quality, longevity and accuracy of a Glock is doing something right. Now, like I said, the HS2000 didn’t kick the Glock’s butt. It just simply did everything as well the Glock. That's right. Step for step. If the quality remains consistent form gun to gun in the manufacturing process, and if the long-term durability proves to be there, HS America is going to sell a lot of pistols. And at half the cost of a Glock, it’s going to be hard to beat. So every time some know-it-all at the range pokes fun because your pistol is from Croatia, just shut him up by putting ten rounds in the “X” ring (and then to add insult to injury, back it up with another magful from your Makarov). Now, for some simililarities between the HS2000 and the Glock 17: the most noticeable similarity (other than being polymer) is the trigger safety -- virtually identical; the “checkering” pattern on the frontstrap and backstrap is also quite similar; there are ambi-thumb indents near the top of the grip; and the metal is finished in a Tenifer-type finish. Some differences include the following: this is one of the biggest, in my opinion -- the Glock can be had with pre-ban hi-capacity magazines (although 15rd mags are available for the HS for LEOs); the HS has ambidextrous mag release buttons; the mags are made of hard chrome, not polymer; the grip is narrower and contains an indent on the backstrap for the web area between the thumb and index finger, and an indent for the index finger just under the trigger guard where it meets the frontstrap (these two features allow the pistol to sit a bit lower in the hand); in addition to the loaded chamber indicator, there is a firing pin status indicator; the backstrap has a 1911-type grip safety; the guide rod extends slightly forward of the muzzle and acts as a stand-off device for contact shots (think of an LEO engaged in a hand-to-hand struggle with a perp); the slide accepts standard Sig Sauer & aftermarket nightsights. Some other features of the HS2000 (most of which also appear on the Glock, but I thought were worth mentioning): tactical rails for mounting lights and lasers (although mine is a very early version that didn’t include this feature); very THICK slide rails molded into the frame; trigger group appears to be made of heavy duty metal; polymer in the dust cover area is reinforced in order to better support tactical accessories. In other words, the HS appears to be built for the long haul. Everything about it speaks of robustness. Now for the performance (and a few personal preferences and observations): I found the HS to be a more natural fit for my hand. The Glock felt a tad too wide and, for lack of a better word, clunky. On the other hand, my friend thought the HS was just a shade too narrow for his tastes. The trigger pull was probably a bit shorter and lighter on the Glock, but not by much in either case. In fact, the pull on the HS is quite good, IMHO. I’d bet it’s in the neighborhood of 5 lbs. The sight picture was excellent on both pistols. The HS pointed a little more naturally for me, but then again, I’m more comfortable with its grip than the Glock’s. My friend felt more at home with the Glock (not surprising, since it’s his gun and he’s put thousands of rounds through it). And when it came to actually firing these two pistols, it was virtually a toss-up. I did slightly better with the HS, and he did better with the Glock. We put approximately 300 rounds of various FMJ and JHP through each pistol, at distances of 25 ft. and 25 yds. This included the following: American Eagle 115gr FMJ; Speer Gold Dot 124gr JHP; Corbon 125gr JHP; Federal Hydro-Shok 147gr JHP; Ultramax remanufactured 115gr FMJ; and some loose UMC (not sure of specs) that was lying in the bottom of my friends range bag. Neither pistol hiccupped once. No feed jams, no stovepipes, no failure to go into battery, no nothing. Accuracy of the UMC ammo was less than desirable with either pistol, but the rest were more than acceptable, with the Speer giving the best results. Five-shot groups of less than 2 in. with most ammo at 25 ft were not uncommon. Groups under 3 in. at 25 yds were also common. I’ll take that in any pistol, any day. Best group of the day at 25 ft was under 1.5 in. from the HS, but the Glock had numerous groups close to that. Best group at 25 yds was 2.25 in. from the Glock (again, the HS was often in that neighborhood). There were a few exceptional groups that would have competed for top honors had it not been for the occasional flyer. Can’t blame it on either pistol, because it always happened with me as the shooter (I’ll admit it, my buddy is a better shooter). Shooting left hand was about the same for either pistol, but performing a mag change was easier with the HS due to the ambi-release. Rapid fire shots were also similar between guns, again with me doing better with the HS and my friend doing better with the Glock. Seat of the pants feel, tells me I was experiencing a little less muzzle flip with the HS --- most likely due to my comfort level with the grip. So, in summary, I think it’s safe to say I’m impressed with my new pistol. The fact that it cost so little makes it all the better. As I mentioned at the beginning of this diatribe, the unknown variable with this pistol is its longevity. If the HS2000 holds up in the long haul, and if it performs across the board as it did for me today, this Eastern European pistol will have every right to be mentioned in the same breath as the big names from Western Europe. It’s not without precedence, especially when you look at what the CZ-75 gives you for the money. I hope the CZ's comrade from Croatia can do the same. One final note, I anxiously await the offering of other calibers and frame sizes. I’ve wanted a top-notch .40S&W and a .357sig for quite some time. But I haven’t felt like shelling out the big bucks for a Sig/HK/Beretta/Glock or the like. I’m also partial to compacts. It sure would be nice to add a couple more guns to the stable with out paying an arm and a leg. Besides, it’s so much fun taking my Makarovs, Mosins, CZs, Saiga, etc. to the range and having folks ask “What kind of gun is that??” Now I can stump them with one more.

Take care all. Marko
 

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Thank you for the repost. I am a recent XD9 service model owner and I love it. However all I have heard from die hard GLOCK fans is it will not hold up in the long run.
I have nothing against GLOCKS as I own a 23, However as many here have said I like the feel of the XD better and find I shoot better with it.
As a matter of fact I like my XD so much I think it needs a brother, perhaps the 45 once it is out.
Again thanks for repost.
 

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i'm gettin' all teary eyed.. :p :D ..great to have this stuff back up

mike
 
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