Springfield XD Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have decided I want to start reloading so I can shoot more. I only plan on reloading 9mm Luger and would like to have the option in the future to reload 45 ACP if I get a 1911 :) No riffles for me besides my 10/22.

I have been bouncing all over the place soaking up info and looking at different presses/kits. I started by looking at the Lee single stage kits, then the Lee turret kits, then the Lee Pro 1000 9mm kit. Then back to single stage RCBS Partner and now Hornady LNL. :-?

I "think" I would rather go with a higher quality single stage kit over a lower quality progressive kit. I'm looking to load about 500 rounds per month to start and I want to keep things basic for now.

So basically if I could get some guidance, these are the things I think I'll need:

- Reloading Manual
- Press
- Carbide Dies
- Shell Holder (if it doesn't come with dies)
- Scale
- Hand Priming Tool (again, depends on press)
- Pocket Cleaning Tool
- Powder Measure
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
A lot of people bash the Lee Pro 1000....i have had 2 of them over the years for diffrent guns i have had....for me they work great...the primer system on them sucks a$$ so i hand prime after tumbling....then feed them in the 1000 and your off....is it a LNL...no....is it a Dillon...No...but it still does a very good job...getting ready to order another one myself for my 40 S&W....the only other thing that i never did care for was the Lee Dies...and any Lee dies i have had and i have had a few i never cared for them at all...the seating die was way to inconsistant...never could get the COL where i wanted it for every shell...easy fix...swap in a RCBS seater die...thats my plans for the next one.

now single stage press wise its real hard to beat RCBS in my opinion...the kit they have for like $300 i think it is has the Rockchucker press...that thing is a beast...but its harder to crank out any rounds like you will a progressive...but you can use it for anything and pretty much any caliber.

Tumber wise i really like the one that cabelas has...have had a few of them and they work great the sifting pan is a joke and makes a mess...so i bought the media seperator..that is a good investment

far as scales go to me depends on what im using and loading...most powders will throw pretty close especially with pistol powders...but not always right on the money...if your wanting it exact every time get a balance beam scale...something like a RCBS 505 scale...and then get a powder trickler....with it you can get the weight exact to the 1/10th of a grain...more important with this really in rifles but never hurts with pistol...expecially if your shooting in competition or want to and have to worry about a power factor...you want to make sure all your rounds are the same
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
I went through the exact same thing you did a couple months ago. I also reload only 9mm right now and as of yesterday, have reloaded just over 2,800 rounds. Deciding on a press is a decision you will have to make based on what you can afford and what your goals for reloading are. My goals changed quite a bit over the past couple of months and I went from wanting a basic setup that was reliable and versatile to wanting to get almost everything available!

In my decision making process, I wanted something that would be reliable and from a reputable company that would stand by their product. The two companies that stood out were Hornady and Dillon.

I first had my eyes on a basic Dillon Square Deal 'B'. It does pistol calibers very well and is a fairly quick 4 station AP press. Cost is also fairly low to get up and running. But I knew I would someday want to reload rifle cartridges as well. This lead me to the Dillon 550B 4 station AP press and also brought the Hornady Lock-N-Load AP press in my sights. The Dillon was just a little more expensive but their 'no questions asked' warranty and reputation, I was leaning towards them. Although in comparison, I didn't find anyone leaving reviews that had a bad customer service experience with Hornady.

While doing the research, I decided that I wanted a little more of a safety margin in my reloading as well as adding in some additional flexibility. The safety margin I wanted was in the form of a powder checker to ensure I wasn't going to accidentally load a squib or double charge load. Dillon, RCBS, and Hornady all have them with Dillon's being electronic and the most expensive and Hornady's being the most basic and least expensive. I decided to go the middle of the road and use the RCBS Lock-out-die. But now I needed a press with 5 stations instead of 4. Now I had to consider the Dillon 650 5 station press and the Hornady Lock-N-Load.

In the end, for economic reasons, I decided to go Hornady. It was cheaper to purchase out of the gate and was just as reliable and performed just as well as the Dillon based on my research. I've had to get a part replaced a few weeks ago and their customer support was excellent. They had the part shipped to me the same day that I placed the call and 3 days later, it was delivered.

Both presses are excellent performers and you won't go wrong deciding on either. As far as your equipment list, you will need to revise it if you go with a progressive press like the Hornady or Dillon.

Books are #1. Get at least one and read it thoroughly. Get more if you can afford it. I have the Hornady, Speer, and Lyman books for reference. Much of the stuff is redundant between them and some recipes will contradict each other between books so be aware of this. But each has some unique information available.

With an progressive press, you will need a primer flip tray, dies, powder check device (if you choose to get one), shell plate, scale, impact bullet puller, and a case cleaning system. I created a thread when I was starting out and it had many good suggestions from others here: http://www.xdtalk.com/forums/ammo-can/169233-getting-into-reloading-casting-heres-my-list.html

Good luck in your decision making process. You are getting into what can be an addictive hobby! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I went through the exact same thing you did a couple months ago. I also reload only 9mm right now and as of yesterday, have reloaded just over 2,800 rounds. Deciding on a press is a decision you will have to make based on what you can afford and what your goals for reloading are. My goals changed quite a bit over the past couple of months and I went from wanting a basic setup that was reliable and versatile to wanting to get almost everything available!

In my decision making process, I wanted something that would be reliable and from a reputable company that would stand by their product. The two companies that stood out were Hornady and Dillon.

I first had my eyes on a basic Dillon Square Deal 'B'. It does pistol calibers very well and is a fairly quick 4 station AP press. Cost is also fairly low to get up and running. But I knew I would someday want to reload rifle cartridges as well. This lead me to the Dillon 550B 4 station AP press and also brought the Hornady Lock-N-Load AP press in my sights. The Dillon was just a little more expensive but their 'no questions asked' warranty and reputation, I was leaning towards them. Although in comparison, I didn't find anyone leaving reviews that had a bad customer service experience with Hornady.

While doing the research, I decided that I wanted a little more of a safety margin in my reloading as well as adding in some additional flexibility. The safety margin I wanted was in the form of a powder checker to ensure I wasn't going to accidentally load a squib or double charge load. Dillon, RCBS, and Hornady all have them with Dillon's being electronic and the most expensive and Hornady's being the most basic and least expensive. I decided to go the middle of the road and use the RCBS Lock-out-die. But now I needed a press with 5 stations instead of 4. Now I had to consider the Dillon 650 5 station press and the Hornady Lock-N-Load.

In the end, for economic reasons, I decided to go Hornady. It was cheaper to purchase out of the gate and was just as reliable and performed just as well as the Dillon based on my research. I've had to get a part replaced a few weeks ago and their customer support was excellent. They had the part shipped to me the same day that I placed the call and 3 days later, it was delivered.

Both presses are excellent performers and you won't go wrong deciding on either. As far as your equipment list, you will need to revise it if you go with a progressive press like the Hornady or Dillon.

Books are #1. Get at least one and read it thoroughly. Get more if you can afford it. I have the Hornady, Speer, and Lyman books for reference. Much of the stuff is redundant between them and some recipes will contradict each other between books so be aware of this. But each has some unique information available.

With an progressive press, you will need a primer flip tray, dies, powder check device (if you choose to get one), shell plate, scale, impact bullet puller, and a case cleaning system. I created a thread when I was starting out and it had many good suggestions from others here: http://www.xdtalk.com/forums/ammo-can/169233-getting-into-reloading-casting-heres-my-list.html

Good luck in your decision making process. You are getting into what can be an addictive hobby! :)
Thanks for the info. I already read your thread :D

I think for my budget and round count requirements a single stage will do. I have pretty limited funds (and a Jeep addiction that is my first love) so I won't be going crazy.

There is a lot of gear out there so I'm just trying to make some key decisions to narrow things down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,197 Posts
Thanks for the info. I already read your thread :D

I think for my budget and round count requirements a single stage will do. I have pretty limited funds (and a Jeep addiction that is my first love) so I won't be going crazy.

There is a lot of gear out there so I'm just trying to make some key decisions to narrow things down.
While I still use a ss press, along w/ my 550B & 650, unless you have a very low volumn need, it will be really slow. The Lee Classic Turret is the better bet IMO, even over any of their progressives. IT works, the Lee progressives many times need a bunch of tweeking. I didn't buy a progressive to spend time tweeking it. So my recommendation would be the LCT or save a few more $$ & get a LNL or 550B. Better presses still & not much more moeny when you look at the savings in ammo & the fact the gear lasts longer than you will. The Lee, not so much. Most buy one & then replace it in a few years w/ a better machine. So just start w/ the better machine & be done with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
For 500 rounds a month, I would go with a good RCBS single stage. Start simple, get a good feel for the process. Read and learn from others, reloading can be enjoyable. But IMHO, you need to crawl before you run. With a SS, it gives you quick easy adjustments for caliber changeover's. I have a 650 and SD where I've invested several hundred $$$ on kits and change-overs, but for loading a quick batch for weekend shooting. Running them through the SS is pretty darn quick and avoids all the hassle of timing the press after switching primer and shell feeds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Wow, I just looked at the Dillon Square Deal B. That is very nice. It looks like you buy directly from Dillon?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
dillon xl650! search for my posts... i should have some reviews out there. I also have videos on youtube showing how to reload from start to finish on the 650. search for my username "wingzerothree".

I say the 650 cuz you are going to acquire more guns, and if you are like me you want those bullets now! i just did 100 rounds of 9 in under 10 min the other day and they work great! then when you switch to a different caliber you just swap toolheads and everything is already set for you when you switch back.. no re-adjusting like with these cheaper units out there they dont have toolhead systems, which most do nowadays anyway. but autoindexing is where its at and you dont get that with anything else. if you arent serious about reloading and dont care being slow then get something cheaper. and yes with dillon you buy direct from them and call them when there is a problem and they make it right, or tell you what you are doing wrong ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Dillon is just down the road. Picked up both presses out of their "factory" in the back. The SD is nice, I have it set up mainly for 9mm with a complete change-over for the .38. I would imagine I can average 250 to 275 rounds an hour with the SD. The 650 is set up for 45 with a change-over for .223. I've found the time spent for changing and tweaking the 650 is kind of a pain, so I just load .223 on my SS. With my 650, I can crank out @350 plus an hour of 45.

So needless to say when I decide to load 9mm or 45, I usually have a couple of thousand empties to make it worth while. :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
dillon xl650! search for my posts... i should have some reviews out there. I also have videos on youtube showing how to reload from start to finish on the 650. search for my username "wingzerothree"
It would be much more helpful to actually provide links rather than saying go search for me if you want information. :)

Dogman, yes, you can get the Square Deal 'B' directly from Dillon or you can go to http://www.brianenos.com/store/dillon.sqdeal.html and get free shipping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,197 Posts
Wow, I just looked at the Dillon Square Deal B. That is very nice. It looks like you buy directly from Dillon?
Dillon or BiranEnos.com. Be advised though, the SDB only used Dillon dies & no rifle or 357sig.:(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
I searched around awhile myself about a year ago looking at the various options as a newbie reloader. I ended up with a used Dillon 550 that I won on an auction site with all the necessary dies and such for my needs. Look around lots of people selling used gear and its mostly durable stuff and is easy to get parts for. Be sure you know what a new setup is worth when comparing to used equipment.

The 550 being a progressive is a joy to load on its really not difficult at all especially if you are loading a single caliber and never change. But knowing that if you want to upgrade to a rifle or another pistol caliber then its pretty easy to swap out tool heads and go. Its actually really simple to set up and get adjusted correctly, I have turned out more than 300 per hour with it, even stopping to fill the primer tube every 100 rounds. It doesn't have any of the timing requirements to get up and running its manually indexed.

Its actually really simple to understand after you have run your first few rounds. Pull the lever and this (deprimes in station 1) (charges powder in station 2) (seats the bullet in station 3) (crimps case in station 4)... now press forward to seat a new primer in station 1. Rotate the shell plate set a new bullet on the case in station 3 and an empty cleaned case in station 1 and repeat, till your arm falls off. :D I cant imagine loading handgun rounds on a single stage unless its something you shoot 1 or 2 times a year.

I will say that I made the correct decision as I was origninally thinking about Lee also and am glad I ended up with a Dillon, now that I have had it for while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,197 Posts
dillon xl650! search for my posts... i should have some reviews out there. I also have videos on youtube showing how to reload from start to finish on the 650. search for my username "wingzerothree".

I say the 650 cuz you are going to acquire more guns, and if you are like me you want those bullets now! i just did 100 rounds of 9 in under 10 min the other day and they work great! then when you switch to a different caliber you just swap toolheads and everything is already set for you when you switch back.. no re-adjusting like with these cheaper units out there they dont have toolhead systems, which most do nowadays anyway. but autoindexing is where its at and you dont get that with anything else. if you arent serious about reloading and dont care being slow then get something cheaper. and yes with dillon you buy direct from them and call them when there is a problem and they make it right, or tell you what you are doing wrong ;)
I can assure you, 99% of all reloaders do not need the complexity & cost of a 650. All of the good progressives will load 100rds of anything in 10m, regardless of auto indexing or not. The speed advantage in a prgoressive is not autoindexing, but the case & bullet feeders. I load on a 550B & 650. The 550B runs abot 500/hr sustained & the 650 about, well 650. The advantage in the 650 is the case feeder.
Most reloaders are well served by a LNL or 550B w/o case feeder. Less complicated, cheaper. Even the Lee LCT will do 150rds/hr, more than enough for the hobby shooter. If you reload for a bunch of calibers, the 650 gets really expensive really quick. I load for 14 diff handgun caliber, many not even on the 550B because I only shoot 100-200 a yr of those. DOn't get me wrong, the 650 is a great machine, just way more than most need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I've done some more reading and now understand the difference between the turret and a progressive. I have also done some more thinking about the reality of my budget and I'm looking hard at the Lee Classic Turret. I think that will fit both my budget and my requirements. From what I've read it's not a piece of junk and that's what I'm trying to avoid.

I have also decided to take my time and not jump into this too quickly :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
I have Lee's turret and progressive press....I always end up using the turret more then the progressive. They both work well, but the turret has been more convenient for me...maybe it's because that's what i started with. Caliber change is much faster!
The turret can be used also as a single stage press, so I end up using it in single mode for depriming before i throw all my brass in for cleaning.
As far as powder charging, so far with the three different powders I have used (bullseye, power pistol, and hp-38 ) they all gave very consistent charges.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,197 Posts
I've done some more reading and now understand the difference between the turret and a progressive. I have also done some more thinking about the reality of my budget and I'm looking hard at the Lee Classic Turret. I think that will fit both my budget and my requirements. From what I've read it's not a piece of junk and that's what I'm trying to avoid.

I have also decided to take my time and not jump into this too quickly :)
I agree. If you need the speed/volumn of a progresive, then buy one that works 100% out of the box, that is not a Lee. The LCT is a decent piece of gear though. I would buy one, but have no need. I am using the 550B for 10 diff calibers, the 650 for 2 & my ss press for the other 12 rifle & two pistol calibers.;) I would probably be happy sellling the ss press & going w/ the turret for small batch loading, but I am not sure the turret will ahndle some of the big rifle rounds I do load.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Well, I ordered a LCT press and everything to go with it. It should be here Friday. In the meantime, I've been reading a couple of manuals. I feel good about my order, time will tell if I made the right decision.

I also ordered some bullets and brass (First Class Bullets & Brass) and I'll pick up some powder and primers locally.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Welcome to Reloading, Lee Classic Turret is a nice place to start. Sorry I don't think they have an upgrade path to the Load Master. I've been reloading for 15+yrs on a single stage press and now really regret not moving to the Load Master 14 years ago.
Hope you enjoy reloading and find yourself on a LoadMaster by next Christmas. Cheers!
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top