Springfield XD Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My only hand gun is XDM 40cal. 4.5 I shoot for fun and is my edc. I did chop the grip. search xdm grip chop. Anyways I always here about getting the trigger worked on. I shoot about 700 rnds a year. Do I need the trigger worked on? I think springer precision has two types. Like the 100.00 job or 150.00. :p I find the gun very accurate. I guess I'm a natural shot. I would not know how the trigger feels because I have not shot another hand gun. They say out of the polymer hand guns the xdm is the lightest. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,806 Posts
Define need... like do you need it to be accurate with the gun, or for it to function properly? NO

Trigger jobs make it easier for you to still be accurate with less technique involved... heavier triggers and mushy triggers require more muscle control and force, thus increasing the odds that you will muck up the shot... lighter triggers and crisp triggers require less muscle control and less force, in a sense making you shoot better without as much effort on your part.... the weapon however functions pretty much the same either way, you are the variable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
NO! Please don't take this the wrong way. You say you shoot 700rds a year, I would suggest that you first need to look into spending more money on ammo and range time. 700rds a year is barely getting there in terms of skill maintenance and the stock trigger is perfectly suitable for paper punching and SD.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,540 Posts
See in another post where you ask the same question you said 1000 rounds a year...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,540 Posts
Ill just past from the thread placed in the wrong section.

Is there an issue with your trigger? Do you NEED one as in the current one will not work? No the stock trigger will work for tens of thousands of rounds. Do you NEED a new trigger to have fun? No. Do you WANT a new trigger?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Yes I'm learning! I could not find my other post. Anyways the amount of rounds is around 700-1000. I don't keep a gun journal, no offense. Maybe some people do and know the exact amount of rounds ever shot through one gun. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Does the trigger work well for you?

If you hate the trigger or you just can't use it, then sure swap it out for a trigger kit. But, if you have no complaints with the trigger and you shoot well with it, then you don't "need" a trigger job.

Like most things in life you have to define what your needs are and make adjustments as required.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
38,922 Posts
I'll give you the simple answer ... NO !!!

Now if you shoot a gun that has had some trigger work done on it, your mind might change ... But until that time, enjoy your stock trigger, and the peace of mind that, you'll likely not have an mechanical problems with it, and also won't need to spend extra on a lawyer, if you ever have to use it defensively ;)

The lawyer aspect always opens a can of worms for some people (argument), but the simple reality is, an unmodified gun makes for a simpler defense ... And you can be guaranteed that a prosecuting attorney will use a modified gun against you.
Right or wrong, that's part of their job.

Don't believe me ... Google Harold Fish !!!
They used the type of gun, and the ammo he used against him ... Just imagine what the prosecution might do with a modified gun, if given the chance.

Oh, and I'm kind of biased - XD9 Fails :mrgreen:

With all that said,
There's a big difference between "need" and "want" :wink:

If you decide you "want" ... Get !!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,581 Posts
IMO the best trigger job any shooter can get is a good double action revolver and spending some time mastering it. IMO there is not finer handgun you can find for learning good trigger technique that shooting a double action revolver.

Yeah, I'm a revolver snob, however I'm also not the least bit bothered by different triggers and can tell you that you'll find that is true for anyone who spends a fair bit of time shooting a double action revolver. Fact is that if it weren't for the Recurve Bow I expect that Cliff would have been among the final group of shooters on Top Shot. Bit of a disappointment there, I had real hopes that he'd put a real beatdown in that arrogant "seal" Jake.

BTW, does anyone else wonder how on earth a total prick and braggart like this was ever a Navy Seal? I really have to wonder how well Top Shot checked into his credentials.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
IMO the best trigger job any shooter can get is a good double action revolver and spending some time mastering it. IMO there is not finer handgun you can find for learning good trigger technique that shooting a double action revolver.

Yeah, I'm a revolver snob, however I'm also not the least bit bothered by different triggers and can tell you that you'll find that is true for anyone who spends a fair bit of time shooting a double action revolver. Fact is that if it weren't for the Recurve Bow I expect that Cliff would have been among the final group of shooters on Top Shot. Bit of a disappointment there, I had real hopes that he'd put a real beatdown in that arrogant "seal" Jake.

BTW, does anyone else wonder how on earth a total prick and braggart like this was ever a Navy Seal? I really have to wonder how well Top Shot checked into his credentials.
Thanks for the spoiler. Really appreciate it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
NO! Please don't take this the wrong way. You say you shoot 700rds a year, I would suggest that you first need to look into spending more money on ammo and range time. 700rds a year is barely getting there in terms of skill maintenance and the stock trigger is perfectly suitable for paper punching and SD.
I disagree. Round count should never be used as a measure of your ability with a handgun. Shooting live rounds is really meant to verify what you're doing during dry-fire practice. Find Bruce Gray online and download his free dryfire practice packet. I promise you that if you dryfire 10mins a day for 2 weeks and then hit the range, you will notice a drastic improvement in your shooting. Just make sure you do it with some snap caps... the striker retainer pin is the weak link in the XD design. $10 worth of snap caps and 10 minutes a day is going to improve your skills MUCH more than a $150 trigger job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I disagree. Round count should never be used as a measure of your ability with a handgun. Shooting live rounds is really meant to verify what you're doing during dry-fire practice. Find Bruce Gray online and download his free dryfire practice packet. I promise you that if you dryfire 10mins a day for 2 weeks and then hit the range, you will notice a drastic improvement in your shooting. Just make sure you do it with some snap caps... the striker retainer pin is the weak link in the XD design. $10 worth of snap caps and 10 minutes a day is going to improve your skills MUCH more than a $150 trigger job.
I do not disagree; dry-firing drills, if done correctly are a good way to practice your skills and hone in on errors. Indeed I believe lasers are one of the best aids in dry-fire drills. But there is NO substitute for live firing.

I won't enlighten on my background in detail, but I have spent a lot of time (many years) with small arms simulators, trialing them and also reporting (lengthy papers) on their value in the training environment. They will never fully repace the the training value of live firing. Although some accountants would have us beleive otherwise!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
BTW, does anyone else wonder how on earth a total prick and braggart like this was ever a Navy Seal? I really have to wonder how well Top Shot checked into his credentials.
He was in [the SEALS] for 3 years, left as a Lt. His career (if ya can call it that) was pretty turmultuous amid various claims and one formal complaint of racial discrimination. So yeah they did there background, but he left over 10 years ago, so his claims of ability are somewhat dated and (IIRC) Officers don't often (ever) fill the sniper role, so his claims ('top 2 in a line-up of 60 SEALS') are both bogus and very unlikely.

Back to the topic at hand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
839 Posts
I say learn the right way, the first time, get a trigger job.

There is no experience needed for a crisp trigger...or one with a minimal reset, lack or creep and over-travel or a lighter pull.

Now, I do fully believe there is a limit to this...especially in this world of uber-light trigger fanatics that want a 1.5# pull.

I just had my trigger done to 3.5# and although I do consider myself an experienced shooter...I would not hesitate to put my pistol in the hands of a novice. It's not going to shot itself or go full auto.

Becoming a good shooter with any one firearm takes time, practice and most of all, developed muscle memory. With time you will anticipate the over-travel, anticipate the jerky motion and even the long reset. To me this is learning bad mechanics, especially if you get a trigger job later and re-learn to shoot it all over again.

I say get the trigger job done now and learn with it...just don't go nuts on the pull weight like many do, you'll land up regretting it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
^^^ +1 on smokehouse's advice. That being said, if you commit to a mild trigger job, keep your expectations realistically low because even though it may feel different, it won't make an above average shooter become the next competition against Taran Butler. If you plan to do it, DO IT SOONER rather than later and train with it. Otherwise your hard earned money may not yield much in terms of tangible results.

Just make sure you are thinking about the philosophy of use. Prioritize your performance needs. If this is for fun, sport, entertainment, gaming, defense, combat, duty. Safety and ease of use are important to consider.

If you are shooting your pistol well enough for your needs, keep it the way it was designed and train with it. Focus on drawing from a holster, rapid target acquisition, moving from cover to cover, changing magazines, malfunction drills. Trigger performance is only one part of total performance of a firearm.

Many folks ask their pistols to do something it really wasn't designed for. Like shoot 0MOA at 45ft.

LET ME SHARE AN EXAMPLE. I've shot 1911's competitively (not that I'm any good b/c I suck actually) for the last year. So a lot of trigger time behind a very short trigger with a short reset. Muscle memory that I spent some big bucks and time building. Now I've decided to transition to higher capacity, lower cost pistols like the xdm. Since all my trigger time is with a 1911, the trigger has been the toughest thing to relearn. As a result, I'm looking at one of the Powder River Precision trigger systems to reduce take up, over travel, and trigger pull weight to make it CLOSER to the 1911. By bringing the trigger characteristics closer to what I know, I am hoping to reduce the $$ and time I need to learn the XDm trigger. But here's the hang up. If I do this, then I'm committing to a weapon system that is tuned to a custom setup. So if I buy another XDm, say a compact or a comp series, I'd better invest the same $$ in a trigger system in those guns too or my fine muscle memory will be wasted.

For my defensive shooting goals, I want as much familiarity and consistency across the multiple versions of the same platform (XDm) as I can get. Meaning: I don't want to have a stock trigger on a carry gun, combat action job on a training gun, competition job on a competition gun. They would all feel different. WHY? So "when the defecation hits the oscillation", I'm going to be operating whatever I pick up with total muscle memory, instinct, and perform at the best level I need to survive and stop the threat.

That's my $.02.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Do you need a trigger job ?No do you need 5,10 20 50... guns ? No.

Two identical guns,one with a quality professional trigger job and one is stock,which would you choose? I'd take the nice crisp trigger myself,but that's me.
Whats wrong with having a good trigger job ? Nothing IMOP.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Am I the only one who loves the stock xdm trigger? I feel like mine is better than my glock and s&w p99L. Those are usually mentioned in the top for a polymer trigger...other than kahr.

I was dead set thinking I was going to need a trigger job before I got my gun in, but it's great IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,507 Posts
Am I the only one who loves the stock xdm trigger? I feel like mine is better than my glock and s&w p99L. Those are usually mentioned in the top for a polymer trigger...other than kahr.

I was dead set thinking I was going to need a trigger job before I got my gun in, but it's great IMO.

Yep, you're the only one!:) Some guns have better triggers out of the box than others. Just luck of the draw and tolerance stack up. Mine was on the not good end of the scale.


I like a trigger that feels more like a good SA and the stock one just wasn't that at all. After some judicious polishing of components and a PRP basic kit, it's drastically better. It has the factory springs in it and feels low enough for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
I've owned several XDms and have been very happy just installing the Powder River? (I believe) over travel stop. After that, I don't think these trigers are bad at all.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top