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Really? Even on the range? In the Army I don't know how many times I've heard the RSO go: Ready on the right-ready on the left-BANG!
Yes in the Marine Corps you can go to the brig for an accidental discharge, and you will go if you do.
It's less scary to fire a weapon at a target walk forward knowing that behind you to your left or right another Marine is going to take a shot as soon as you get down in the prone position, when EVERYBODY follow the four basic rules. It was constant to watch yourself and the guy next to you. Anyone could check anyone for not follwing safety rules.

Things have gotten relaxed in the Marine Corps, you used to go to the brig just for having rust on your rifle. Safety will never be compromised.
 

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Thanks for the great tips guys, i am guilty of the trigger finger, but am getting better with councious effort and practice, my biggest problem seems to be when locking the slide back. I am holding gun with my right hand, pointing gun in safe direction to my left and when i pull the slide and try to lock with my thumb i find my hand tends to tighten to controll gun and my stupid finger sometimes falls down to trigger. working really hard to correct and telling myself out loud not to do it. any tips
 

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Once you become familier with proper trigger discipline, it becomes second nature. So much so that when I was in the gunstore last, I saw this TEENY bersa .22

My immediate thought was: "Damn, where do you line your finger up?"
 

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There are some great safety tips in here that everyone can benifit from. Great post ivssgt.

The only thing that I would add is on the topic of clearing your (or any) gun. you don't always have the luxury of sufficient light when handling a firearm. The one practice I would encourage any of you to adopt is that of indexing the chamber and the mag well (every chamber on a revolver) with your off hand pinky finger to ensure that you have cleared the area. In a world where extractors break, if never hurts to be extra sure that chamber is clear and to fit the tip of your finger in the chamber is one way to know (almost, nothing is 100%) for certain. And unless that magazine fell out into your had, ensure the mag well is clear too.
 

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I also started the habit with power tools. I have been teaching my kids gun safety with my pellet gun as well as toy guns. I know some one who taught his kids gun safety at a realy early age. His 5 year old son was at a friends playing hide and seek and they found a gun in the bedroom. He told his friend not to touch it and took his friend out of the room and went to his friends dad. It was a loaded revolver that was in a safe, but the safe was not locked. I hate to imagine how it could have turned out if neither of the kids knew what to do. I had toy guns as a kid that looked more real than some of the current guns. Infact I still have a dart gun with a heavy trigger that gets used for training.

Train kids early and remind them often. And remember to be sure your guns are secure when their friends are over.
 

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If finger discipline is so important (and I can see that it is, I'm practicing every day, myself...), why does not springer precision develop a rail mounted "trainer" finger rest for us non-lefties?

Or a glue-on/ 3M tape-on one (like that cool clip I saw somewhere on this site) for those wishing a more permanent fixture?

I'll take a freebie of each in exchange for patent rights...:mrgreen:
 

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My first post and something I find very important. When handling my .45 compact I have found overexaggerating my off trigger finger works tremendously well. This is something similar to the muscle memory posts but you'll find that the overexaggeration will make that reach more natural. When you reach for your weapon you'll find your trigger finger comfortably and naturally falls against the slide. This works great for me. Hope this helps.
 

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Invssgt had an excellent post. The only thing I have to add is practice, it takes 3000-5000 repetions of complex movements to make them second nature.
Except when under extreme stress and then you can learn in 8-10 repetitions. This is why Navy Seals train under extreme stress.
 

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stipple a small area as a finger rest, giving you something to "grab" to keep your finger occupied so to speak.
Kinda tired here, long day. But I misread that as "nipple a small area..." and it really took on a whole new meaning.
 

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I can instantly tell the level of training when I hand someone an unloaded pistol.

If they don't check the chamber for themselves or if they immediately put their trigger finger on the trigger, I know that they don't know sh*t.
 

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"keep the bugger picker off the noise maker"
 

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When I went shooting with my wife and our friends we had a nice cure for the primary safety (Trigger finger) not being engaged (Off the slide).

The head slap. When you weren't firing, you policed...Brass, and technique.
 

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When I went shooting with my wife and our friends we had a nice cure for the primary safety (Trigger finger) not being engaged (Off the slide).

The head slap. When you weren't firing, you policed...Brass, and technique.
I handle my XD 40 subcompact just like I'm making the shape of a pistol with my hands. My thumb goes on the cocked indicator on the back of the slide, and my trigger finger rests on the lever pin on the right side, just under the slide. This allows me to bend my finger slightly to have better control of the weapon.

Using this technique, my palm is never in contact with the grip safety. This is the way I always hold the weapon when it's out of the holster. The only time the grip safety is depressed is when I need to rack the slide or I'm ready to shoot.

I usually have the problem of trying to rack the slide and forgetting that the grip safety has to be depressed. That's how ingrained it is in my mind to hold the weapon in a particular manner. I can even find the place for my finger trigger finger in dark and low-light situations.

I've thought about putting a small felt sticker on the lever pin to make it even easier to find.
 

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So I have been around firearms my entire life and I believe I have been a fairly safe shooter. After being part of an accidental discharge where a friend end up shooting himself in the foot with my shotgun when I was 17. (Luckily it was a slug and not a shot shell.) After this AD I believe I have become an above average shooter as far as safety go.

That said the recent purchase of my XD-40 has shown myself a slight weakness in my safety awareness. The fact that the XD does not have manual safety I have become more aware of my somewhat lacking trigger finger discipline. I know that you should only have your finger on the trigger when address a target. I find that in practicing with my XD using snap caps I sometimes end up with my finger still in the trigger guard while clearing or reloading. I am working very hard to completely break this habit.

So does anyone have any good ideas or drills that will help reinforce the habit of keeping my finger out of the trigger guard expect when actually ready to shoot. I would like to get in the habit of doing this far more strictly than I do know with all my firearms but especially the XD since it has no manual safety.

Comments and Suggestion appreciated

mcb
I'm 54 years old and I had the exact same experience. I have always shot "Wheel guns" and bolt/lever rifles. I have never had a gun without a safety or was not a DA. This has taught me that my gun safety is not up to par. It is said that "it takes 30 days to make a habit permanent", so for the next month, I will work on the drills listed here. Thanks to all that posted.
 

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Im feeling exactly the same as you Texas, all DAs n safety's , and ill be doing the same,, I have a habit of trigger fingerin my rugers with a hot pipe

its a new day...
 

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I learned from an early age about trigger and muzzle discipline. I used to get the old smack in the back of the head by the old man when I messed up. I have not bee around guns in a while and went to the gun shop the other day and it is still there, so it worked and I am glad that I don't have to break a bad habit, but I will be conscious so that I don't eff up! Good info here!
 

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As a Newbie to handguns, this post is a fantastic reminder of developing the skill and habit of keeping the trigger finger on the slide.

Very important and helpful post!

Thanks.
 

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I just finished a tactical pistol class, first class on guns in 30+ years, and I noticed that I've cultivated at least one habit that I'm not sure I want to break.

After engaging my target, placing rounds downrange, I come to the low ready position with my finger resting on the trigger (by resting I mean that I'm not depressing the trigger safety on my XD(M)) while I perform my after action check, head to both sides, glance up, glance back, and then I remove and index my finger to the side off the trigger. Holster safely and slowly.

My thinking in this is that if there is an additional threat that my after action drills spot, I want to be able to go directly to a sight picture and depress the trigger again, and I don't want to have to move my hand from it's already perfect position. I'm holding the muzzle down range and down.

Comments, corrections?
 
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