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Discussion Starter #1
I am currently working loads for XDM .40 and Taurus .40 using Power Pistol Powder...just curious what kind of results and loads you may be using. I am using 165gr Berry's Plated bullets over 6.3gr PP powder...good results so far, tho this is the first load up I have done for the .40.

Like I said, just curious of any results anyone else has had...:D
 

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A lot of guys like it for the 40. I have been happy w/ WSF or Unique, but recently bought some to play with. I have a new G32 coming w/ extra 40 bbl, stay tuned.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I load up 6.6gr of PP with a a65gr fmj. This load seems to be the most accurate for my XD40SC.
Shot up my loads of 6.3gr, they shot ok...but not great, no issues just not real accurate. Going to start working some up at 6.5 for the next go around. If memory serves me right max is 7.0gr and don't want to get too close to that...
 

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I love it in the .357, maybe I'll give it a go in the .40
 

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Shot up my loads of 6.3gr, they shot ok...but not great, no issues just not real accurate. Going to start working some up at 6.5 for the next go around. If memory serves me right max is 7.0gr and don't want to get too close to that...
Keep in mind that plated bullets, like Berry's, load closer to a lead bullet than jacketed. SO 7gr might be pushing plated hard. Lyman goes to 7gr w/ a 150gr lead TC. Approach 7gr w/ the 165gr plated w/ caution. Your accuracy issues may also be you reloading technique/die setup. Over crimping plated bullets ruins accuracy. The LFCD, degrades plated bullet accuracy. It's a very soft bullet that deforms easily. The plating is really thin, if you over crimp, you can swage the bullet smaller & break the plating. You'll see this in keyholing & secondary holes in a close target (like under 20ft). This is a 45acp using a TC die & a LFCD. Yeah, the accuracy isn't terrible, but the LFD is worse. Shot at 50ft w/ my best 1911 (windy day).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Keep in mind that plated bullets, like Berry's, load closer to a lead bullet than jacketed. SO 7gr might be pushing plated hard. Lyman goes to 7gr w/ a 150gr lead TC. Approach 7gr w/ the 165gr plated w/ caution. Your accuracy issues may also be you reloading technique/die setup. Over crimping plated bullets ruins accuracy. The LFCD, degrades plated bullet accuracy. It's a very soft bullet that deforms easily. The plating is really thin, if you over crimp, you can swage the bullet smaller & break the plating. You'll see this in keyholing & secondary holes in a close target (like under 20ft). This is a 45acp using a TC die & a LFCD. Yeah, the accuracy isn't terrible, but the LFD is worse. Shot at 50ft w/ my best 1911 (windy day).
Thanks for the heads up on the plated bullets!! I will back off on the crimp a bit before loading up anymore and give that a try!

Nice shootin btw! :D
 

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Thanks for the heads up on the plated bullets!! I will back off on the crimp a bit before loading up anymore and give that a try!

Nice shootin btw! :D
Thanks, more the gun than me.;)
 

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Keep in mind that plated bullets, like Berry's, load closer to a lead bullet than jacketed. SO 7gr might be pushing plated hard. Lyman goes to 7gr w/ a 150gr lead TC. Approach 7gr w/ the 165gr plated w/ caution. Your accuracy issues may also be you reloading technique/die setup. Over crimping plated bullets ruins accuracy. The LFCD, degrades plated bullet accuracy. It's a very soft bullet that deforms easily. The plating is really thin, if you over crimp, you can swage the bullet smaller & break the plating. You'll see this in keyholing & secondary holes in a close target (like under 20ft). This is a 45acp using a TC die & a LFCD. Yeah, the accuracy isn't terrible, but the LFD is worse. Shot at 50ft w/ my best 1911 (windy day).
Nice shooting!
 

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Nice shooting!
Thanks, still say it's the gun though. I rarely post any type of target, but this one was relavent to his accuracy question. Many use the LFCD, I think it is a poor way to make good ammo, but that is JMO.
 

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Thanks, still say it's the gun though. I rarely post any type of target, but this one was relavent to his accuracy question. Many use the LFCD, I think it is a poor way to make good ammo, but that is JMO.

I used the LFCD for my 9mm loads and I never had any accuracy issues. But I never used any lead projectiles ever in 9mm. I believe it has to do with the taper on the 9x19mm case though. The LFCD in 9mm only sizes the part closest to the case head and does not really size down near the mouth at all. it just makes sure the case will fit in the chamber without any hiccups........
 

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I used the LFCD for my 9mm loads and I never had any accuracy issues. But I never used any lead projectiles ever in 9mm. I believe it has to do with the taper on the 9x19mm case though. The LFCD in 9mm only sizes the part closest to the case head and does not really size down near the mouth at all. it just makes sure the case will fit in the chamber without any hiccups........
I never saw the need for the LFCD, but bought one in 45acp to try. To answer Baeder, no, I see no issues w/ hard jacketed bullets, it may even slightly enhance accuracy w/ certain calibers. For plated though, I wouldn't, not even in 9mm. For lead, might be ok w/ hard cast, but softer lead bullets would have the same issue, sizing them down to smaller dia inside the case, never good for accuracy.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I never saw the need for the LFCD, but bought one in 45acp to try. To answer Baeder, no, I see no issues w/ hard jacketed bullets, it may even slightly enhance accuracy w/ certain calibers. For plated though, I wouldn't, not even in 9mm. For lead, might be ok w/ hard cast, but softer lead bullets would have the same issue, sizing them down to smaller dia inside the case, never good for accuracy.
That makes sense...in my AR .223 I have seen it increase accuracy...with certain bullet types as you said. This was my very first handloads with my .40's so will try the next batch with no crimp...think I will stick with the same load too rather than work up the charge...only change one variable at a time that way...:D
 

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That makes sense...in my AR .223 I have seen it increase accuracy...with certain bullet types as you said. This was my very first handloads with my .40's so will try the next batch with no crimp...think I will stick with the same load too rather than work up the charge...only change one variable at a time that way...:D
Be sure to remove the bell from the case. No crimp is needed but if any flare is left on the case mouth, the round may not chamber.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Be sure to remove the bell from the case. No crimp is needed but if any flare is left on the case mouth, the round may not chamber.

Not sure what "standard practice" is but I have not needed to flare any of mine so far. IMO the flare is just to help with the seating of the bullet and as long as the bullet goes in straight...also (again just my opinion) but also saves the case life. I feel that the less you "work" the brass the better off you are...
 

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Not sure what "standard practice" is but I have not needed to flare any of mine so far. IMO the flare is just to help with the seating of the bullet and as long as the bullet goes in straight...also (again just my opinion) but also saves the case life. I feel that the less you "work" the brass the better off you are...
It's almost impossible to seat plated bullets & certainly lead bullets, w/o a slight bell to prevent shaving the base. Plated bullets have a very thin plating, easily nicked or torn during seating. This will also play havoc w/ accuracy if the plating is broken. The bullet base is the number one most important part of the bullet after correct size. Bell the brass just enough so the bullet base sits easily on top. It's almost impossible to get a lead bullet to seat properly w/o shaving the base or sides w/o a bell. It's good technique, should even be used w/ jacketed IMO. Then just enough TC to remove any bell. Pull your bullets, if you can see a crimp line, it's too much. If the bullet base has any marks or nicks, you aren't belling enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
It's almost impossible to seat plated bullets & certainly lead bullets, w/o a slight bell to prevent shaving the base. Plated bullets have a very thin plating, easily nicked or torn during seating. This will also play havoc w/ accuracy if the plating is broken. The bullet base is the number one most important part of the bullet after correct size. Bell the brass just enough so the bullet base sits easily on top. It's almost impossible to get a lead bullet to seat properly w/o shaving the base or sides w/o a bell. It's good technique, should even be used w/ jacketed IMO. Then just enough TC to remove any bell. Pull your bullets, if you can see a crimp line, it's too much. If the bullet base has any marks or nicks, you aren't belling enough.
I will have to pull a couple and see what they look like. I had no trouble seating my bullets, went in straight and have no visual exterior evidence of shaving the plating. Would there be evidence of the shaving, such as small plating shavings or anything on the outside of the neck? I dont see any thing like that on mine...:confused: I dont load lead so no worries there....all either FMJ or platted type. Guess this thread is turing out to be a good lesson for me on my first reloads for my .40 as well as first time using plated bullets...:shock:...loaded thousands of small and large rifle rounds but this is my first go with handguns and plated bullets...:rolleyes: hope I didn't make myself look to much like a dope :oops:....lol
 
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