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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
this is right out of the CMP book that comes with every rifle.
since we had a member here have a KABOOM this should be a stickey.
I know for some of us here this is old hat but people new to the M-1 should read and understand this.

thanks
pete













 

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Great post Pete!

I have that little book, too. Came with the nice Service Grade 44 Springer M-1 I got back in 1998.

Anyone that shoots older military rifles needs to understand a few things about ALL older military rifles.

First, just because ammunition is NOW made in a caliber that matches your newly acquired military arm...do NOT assume it is cool to load up and blaze away. Many early military rifles (like the Garand) were made to function with the ammo that was designed for the rifle AT THAT TIME. It means that the metallurgy and design is ok with loadings at that pressure and weight, but when you push the charge and bullet weight/shape to other dimensions....you're doing something that was not intended when the rifle was developed for service.

I cringe when I see boxes of Hornady Light Magnums at gun stores in calibers like 300 British, 7x57 Mauser and 6.5x55 Swede. That ammo will be bought by some fools that don't know any better and at the least, they will ruin a nice collectable and at the worst, might end up in the hospital.

Second thing: if you are going to buy older military surplus rifles, it is very easy to research what you have bought. Find out its history and about conversions and loadings and what works and what to stay away from. This way, you can avoid dangerous rifles like Spanish 93 Mausers converted to 308, low-numered 03 Springfields and yes...loading the wrong 30-06 rounds in the M-1 Garand.

These days, with the internet and enough of us old crusty collectors around with safes full of these things, theres little excuse for NOT knowing about the old military rifles you buy....is there?

If you follow these directions and use a tad of comon sense...you'll never see a problem.

- brickboy240
 

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Brickboy,

I will be doing my own research, but I will probably run it by you on my next surplus rifle purchase.:D You give some good examples of dangerous rifles that I was not aware of. Thanks.
 

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It takes maybe 5 minutes online to find out about many military surplus rifles that are being SOLD but just because somebody imports them, converts them or SELLS them does NOT mean they're safe. Often times, the sellers of some surplus rifles don't know beans about them.

I have see tons of 1893 Spanish Mausers that were converted to 308 Win (from their original 7x57mmm caliber) for sale at gunshows and the person selling them did not know jack sh*t about the things. They say things to passer-bys like "Mausers are super strong and it can take it." Well, thats only half true. The later 98 Mauser action is MUCH stronger than the early 7x57 Mauser action. The 93 action was designed for the much milder 7x57 round and will shoot it all day long with no troubles but there was NO round in the 308 Winchester's power class in those days. Throw in the fact that the metallurgy in 1893 was not tested on cartridges in the 308 class and you have a real disaster waiting to happen. Some pinheads just thought "well...the 308 round will fit in this action...lets re-chamber these and sell them." Not a good idea.

I also saw some German captured M91-30 Nagants rechambered and rebarreled for the 8x57 Mauser round. Again...the Mosin action was not designed for 8x57 chamber pressures. Some M95 Steyr straight pulls were also converted from the 8x50 round to 8x57 Mauser....even more dangerous! Someone was selling an Italian Carcano M91 that was re-chambered for 8x57....another accident waiting to happen.

I don't mean to scare anyone...I shoot Swedish Mausers, British SMLEs and Mosins all the time...but with standard pressure rounds that are exactly what those rifles were designed to shoot. They're perfectly safe with these loadings..but if you load heavier rounds or hotter charges...you're begging for trouble.

Just research what you're buying and you'll neve have trouble. Its pretty easy. Its also fun and informative....you can learn alot of world history this way.

- brickboy240
 
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