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Since many of us who carry guns also have kids in the house, I was wondering if I'm alone in teaching my kids gun safety before they're 2 years old. I know some think it's a waste of time, but they probably don't have any experience with any 1-2 year old children of their own (search "2 year old" on youtube if you want to see what they're capable of).

Just like it's not a waste of time to teach your 6-month old who is crawling on the floor "don't touch daddy's coffee. It's hot" I don't believe it is a waste of time to teach my kids about guns before they're 2 years old.

I didn't start with the NRA's 10 commandments of gun safety (they're too complicated for me to bother trying to remember them myself). I started simple with things like "don't touch the trigger" "daddy's guns can hurt you" and "if you want to touch one of the guns, just ask."

My 4yo and 6yo can recite and demonstrate the 4 safety rules (similar to LtCol Cooper's rules) and my 3yo can demonstrate them. Every time they pick up their Marlin 15YN, they open the bolt to visually check to see if there is a round in the chamber. My daughter was 2 when she learned how to do this.

[off-topic: it always seems strange to me when I hear people recommending "women/inexperienced shooters/kids should get a revolver because 1911s/autos/etc are too complicated for them to learn to shoot." I think that's a self-fulfilling prophecy. If you teach them that a semi-auto is too hard for them to shoot, it will be.]

I believe that if you have guns in the house and wait until your kids are 6 or 8 years old, or until they begin to show an interest in guns to start teaching them firearm safety, you have probably waited too long.
 

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I totally agree with your post. I need to start teaching my 2 year old son before to long.
 

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I don't have kids and my dad didn't have guns.

when I was a kid I was into GI Joe and camping fishing bush craft all that stuff. I liked guns and grandad taught me basics of gun safety when I was around 8 or 9. I guess.

pellet guns at first and then a .22 and a .45. learning about them like that was enough that I never was curious about them.

I didn't worry about having access. If I saw one in the cabinet I didn't think anything of it. I certainly wasn't impressed by it enough I felt I needed to see it or play with it.

for me they were always around places I went. uncles had shotguns and rifles propped in corners and what not. it would be weird to not see something propped in a corner.

ill tell you. that 1911 that day with grandad pretty much took any curious thoughts out of my head. I don't know that I would have wanted to get it out and see it myself, but after that day I was pretty much satisfied and never really thought about it anymore other than its cool and I got to shoot it.

I cant really say what it was that grandad did other than just probably satisfied that thing. made it no big deal I guess.

I suppose its the no big deal aspect that took the desire out. for lack of a better term. I talked to him about guns but didn't bother him to go shoot if I wanted to go he would have taken me. I didn't ask.


it was all pretty casual. I could have been atypical as far as kids attitudes go but thats pretty much how I remember my gun training.
 

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Starting teaching my kids "No" about Daddy's guns as soon as they could understand "no."

They also can recite the Eddie the Eagle "rules". My oldest had to know the 3 main rules of gun safety, before I got her a BB gun. She got that for her at age 6. She really enjoy's shooting, and she knows to stay well away from my guns.
 

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If dads coffee is to hot to touch then dads gun is also, all 6 of my kids have a good understanding of that. So, no it's not a waste of time.

As for the revolver verses auto for ladies. I think that is a great place to start. After they have gotten comfortable with the revolver and want to learn to use the auto, then great. To add to that, I think that goes for everyone men women and kids. The mechanics of the revolver are more basic and it takes a more effort to make to make the revolver go bang. I don't feel like it's self satisfying at all, it's just a step in the learning process.
 
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