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So I'm seeing that everyone is carrying one of these "survival blankets" and a lot of pre-packaged survival kits and even first aid kits come with them. My question is has anyone actually used one to stay warm over night. What kind of temperatures can they handle? I have one but have never tested it and was just wondering if any one had.
 

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I'd imagine in extreme cold they may keep you alive for short periods of time, but you won't be comfortable to say the least. They aren't really a "blanket" just a means of slowing down heat loss.
 

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Well, they are usually mylar, or something very similar, so its a material that will reflect heat. And that works both directions, in and out.
 

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I've used the Adventure Medical brand out over night. I've also used their Emergency Bivvy. Temps were not particularly cold - in the mid-to-upper 50's but certainly cold enough to cause the body temp to drop. Here are a few thoughts:

1. As most of us know, most of our body heat is lost through the top of our head. Retaining that heat is critical. A good wool watch cap is a great way of retaining this heat.

2. The cold earth will sap heat from your body very quickly if you lay directly on it. If you can, build up an insulating layer of leaves, dry grass, pine needles, etc. Lay the space blanket over the top of this insulating layer to reflect the heat of your body back up toward you.

3. An emergency bivvy is much better than an emergency blanket. The two used together is even better still. Build up the insulating layer and put the space blanket over it as described in #2, above. Lay the bivvy on top of the space blanket.

4. Layers of dry clothing will help too. If I intend to solo overnight with limited resources in my pack, I'll carry a spare pair of wool socks and liners and a good base layer in my pack. I may not need the base layer while I'm on the move, but it helps out a lot when you stop moving.

5. Another option is a relatively expensive synthetic-fill sleeping bag like the Eureka Silver City. It's a 30 degree bag that packs up nice and small in a stuff sack. I've been too hot to zip it up in 30 degree weather with a watch cap, base layer and socks on inside of it.

I plan to do another solo night out this fall in a little cooler weather with my Adventure Medical setup.
 

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I love these survival blankets! i got two of them and when it is cold outside you can put it up on one side of your tent and have a fire and the heat reflexes off the blanket and keeps you very warm. they have mulitple uses to them than just using it as a blanket
 

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I used a Space Blanket instead of a shelter half at Fort Hood. It worked great for warmth and as a lean-to. It rained and I stayed dry. It folder to a tiny size and carried it everywhere. I didn't have an OD & Silver one so I didn't take it to Vietnam. Mine was Red & Silver.

I used it in Germany in cold weather and it did its job in the field.
 

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I used to have some thin inner gloves with that mylar stuff or something similar woven into them. They worked great under other gloves (they saved my fingers a couple of time in the old outdoor hokey rinks), but not so good just by themselves. I imagine the survival blanket would be similar. throw some evergreen bows or leaves over the space blanket, and I bet you'd do pretty good. sitting out on a windy day ice-fishing, and I bet you'll be heading for shore long before you catch your limit.

I've got a real thick emergency blanket somewhere that looks like one of those blue tarps, but silver.
 

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I used one camping about two years ago. It stormed really bad at night and the sleeping bags and blankets flooded. It got pretty cold. I used a basic like $5 blanket from Bass Pro I believe. It worked great, I woke up sweating.
 

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Good point! I have never tested one, I bought it more to use in the case of needing to keep some one injured warm until help could arrive, it's part of my medical kit.
 

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I have used numerous emergency blankets, and some thin lint blankets (works very well together with the emergency blankets. But I use a rubberized fleece utility blanket when I want to carry only one. I use it for putting on chains in snow, covering windshields when it gets below freezing, so many uses.

This is as close to what I have that I can find - one side is warm blanket, the other is rubberized. If it is rainy/snowing, it insulates and keeps dry. It also works great as a windbreaker. And it dries out fairly quickly in decent weather.
Amazon.com: Fleece Blanket w/Waterproof Back (Tan ): Sports & Outdoors
 

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I have a few mylar thermal blankets in the BOB. They do reflect body heat very nicely, and will be useful in other ways too.

In winter, I line the insides of the little houses I've made for the outdoor cats and dogs with thermal blankets. It keeps them war and toasty.
 
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