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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been thinking how I want to store my XD in my bedside safe.

What do you think about the following?

Load a mag with a Snapcap last. Insert mag and rack the slide so the Snapcap is in the chamber. Pull trigger (in safe direction of course) so the striker tension is released and resting on the Snapcap.

My thinking is this will do a few things: 1) able to store with action tension released, 2) storing with Snapcap is supposed to be better/safer, 3) if in need to defend my family from an intruder, I can simply re-rack slide to eject Snapcap which will load live round into chamber.

Any thoughts on this?
 

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What is the point in having a bedside gun if it is 1) Inside a safe? 2) Not ready to go when you need it most?

I'll never understand this logic? I'm not bashing you are trying to be a dick but can you explain your reasoning?
 

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Yet you are bashing and being a dick in-spite of your attempt not to. If the man wants to add a level of safety to his routine it's up to him. Could have kids that come into his room, maybe he sleep walks or has another sleep related disorder. Who the hell knows? I have mine in a bed side safe but I pop the lock before turning in for the night.

Whatever keeps you comfortable with your firearm is the routine you should follow. Not sure I'd have a snap cap in unless I was storing for a long period of time. At that point I probably wouldn't have it loaded with live ammo.
 

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What is the point in having a bedside gun if it is 1) Inside a safe? 2) Not ready to go when you need it most?

I'll never understand this logic? I'm not bashing you are trying to be a dick but can you explain your reasoning?
I don't see it as "bashing", it's a legitimate question. If you can't explain your reasoning for what you do, maybe you don't understand why you do it. The OP asked for thoughts on "this" - he's getting them. Some of us don't think much of keeping a self defense weapon locked up and empty.

To the OP's question - Keeping the gun cocked will not hurt it at all. My carry/bedside piece is cocked all the time with one in the chamber. If you need it empty in a safe for other people's safety, so be it. Hit the lock and rack the slide IF you have time. No need to keep a snap cap in there, you're not dropping the hammer on an empty chamber (wouldn't hurt it anyway). Racking the slide will chamber the first live round in the mag regardless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yea, no worries.

My reasoning is for a couple reasons.

This is my first bedside firearm and want as much security while still able to somewhat protect ourselves.
Both my wife and I occasionally sleep walk.
The bedside safe (mechanical) can be opened in a matter of seconds.
We have little nephews/nieces that visit alot and they sometimes wonder around our house.
My time between range visits could be weekly or every six months, so it is a little difficult to know if the storage now will be long term.

Glad to hear everybody's opinions on this, as I enjoy learning from others routines.
 

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What's the difference between that and leaving it with a full magazine in and no round in the chamber?
 

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If you are content with making the compromise of having to pull it and rack it before you point it and shoot it, go for it.
If you carry on a daily basis, is that the way you carry it? Do you train that way? If you normally train yourself to present and shoot without having to work the slide, you may respond that way if, heaven forbid, you have to pull the gun from the safe in order to use it.
Imagine a scenario in which an intruder is in your home. You manage to get the gun out just as he enters the room. You both point and squeeze, only it isn't your gun that goes bang. Now you are shot. You struggle to rack a round. Bang, bang, bang. You are shot some more. You manage to chamber a round. Bang, bang. Still not your gun. Why isn't it coming up? Did I feel more impacts? Who did those last two shots hit? Why is the floor moving?
OK, OK...worst case scenario here. But just food for thought.

EDIT: As far as keeping tension of the springs, it doesn't hurt them in any way. Springs are worn by movement. Relaxed or compressed, if that is their constant state for long periods of time, it does not weaken them.

EDIT 2: Also, what if you become complacent one day (we all are susceptible to this) and fail to load a snap cap? BANG! Negligent Discharge (ND), how many kids in the house? NEVER pull the trigger in the same room as ammo is present (ESPECIALLY with a magazine inserted) unless you intend to destroy something/someone.

EDIT 3: If you don't think your safe is "safe" enough...get a different safe.
 

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Yet you are bashing and being a dick in-spite of your attempt not to. If the man wants to add a level of safety to his routine it's up to him. Could have kids that come into his room, maybe he sleep walks or has another sleep related disorder. Who the hell knows? I have mine in a bed side safe but I pop the lock before turning in for the night.

Whatever keeps you comfortable with your firearm is the routine you should follow. Not sure I'd have a snap cap in unless I was storing for a long period of time. At that point I probably wouldn't have it loaded with live ammo.
I didn't call the guy an idiot for pete's sake. I didn't say "No, you're stupid for doing it that way. Blah Blah bash bash bash. Dumb stupid dumb."

I asked a legitimate question to further understand the mindset of putting your gun in a safe and not having it loaded.

To each his own though.
 

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Another disadvantage i'd see with having a snap cap in place of a live round would be a possible jamming issue. Don't want to but I guess I'll play the what if game. What if you end up having to use your firearm. You get it out of the safe with plenty of time, you rack the slide to remove the snapcap but it doesn't come out all of the way. Now you are in trouble. You have to drop the mag to clear the jam, reinsert the mag, rerack and reaquire a sight picture. All in the dark with a ton of adrenaline.

Seems like more of a disadvantage than anything else.
 

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EDIT 2: Also, what if you become complacent one day (we all are susceptible to this) and fail to load a snap cap? BANG! Negligent Discharge (ND), how many kids in the house? NEVER pull the trigger in the same room as ammo is present unless you intend to destroy something/someone.
Yeah, if you're sleepwalking or you actually have to use it, having a snapcap loaded will still have the same issue of not having a round in the chamber, you still have to rack it for it to go bang. Minus the snapcap, you would alleviate the possibility of above happening. Keep it simple.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This is why I am asking these quesitons. I want to learn.

To cerealbyter, my only reason is to store with a Snapcap in the chamber. Maybe they are just a gimmick and best used for dry fire practice only? and their usefullness in storage is a myth? I dunno.

To kato, I don't carry daily, it is always in the bedside safe or at the range with me. I see what you are saying in the scenario you described.

Sounds like MY best option is to have a loaded mag in the gun with no round in the chamber and the action cocked. This way I can still have a little security of no live round in the chamber, and will be forced to rack the slide to chamber a live round.

As mentioned, either way I go, I better practice so in the dead of night, I can rely on muscle memory while the fog clears up.
 

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To the OP, if my responses sound harsh I apologize.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
good tip about the snapcap causing a jam. That would suck.

great convo guys, I appreciate it!
 

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Sounds like MY best option is to have a loaded mag in the gun with no round in the chamber and the action cocked. This way I can still have a little security of no live round in the chamber, and will be forced to rack the slide to chamber a live round.
Why leave it cocked? Lol. You still have to rack th gun to load a round. If the gun is cocked you have your striker indicator saying the gun is ready to go. It's a mixed message. You will the think the gun has a round chambered, pull the trigger and no bang. This is also counter productive to your thought the springs should be relaxed...

Keep it simple.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Cereal, are you recommending that I keep the gun uncocked, then put a loaded mag in?

This will keep the springs relaxed, and will not have to worry about a Snapcap causing jam, will simply then need to rack the slide ready for business.

Just want to be clear.
 

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Cocked or uncocked on an empty chamber is the same same...you still have to rack the slide and chamber a round. Again, keeping it cocked is not going to hurt it.

Is your primary concern about decocking it (pulling the trigger) worry about damaging the firing pin retaining pin? Just don't decock it.
 

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Cereal, are you recommending that I keep the gun uncocked, then put a loaded mag in?

This will keep the springs relaxed, and will not have to worry about a Snapcap causing jam, will simply then need to rack the slide ready for business.

Just want to be clear.
Yeah. Think about it. What it comes down to is you either want the gun loaded or not. If not, why go through the trouble of adding a step to a routine that has no benefit.

Keep it simple.

Oh and I'm not really recommending it. I just wanted you to think about your overall goal. I'm one that likeS to estimate my effort to benefit ratio. Why do extra work for the same outcome? I'm anti-counter productivity.
 

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so, why exactly is this an issue if the firearm is in a safe? You never elaborate on that OP...Does your 'safe' not lock? Do you habitually leave it open? I wanna make sure I follow your logic...

A loaded mag and empty chamber is the same thing as an unloaded firearm, IMO--if you train with it in Condition 0 then its a mildly better scenario, but still not optimal...Fewer things in the world are as useless as an unloaded firearm, especially in a situation when you need it loaded RFN...

If you don't feel comfortable having a loaded weapon in the safe, are you positive you have the right safe? Is it a training issue? Anxiety is sometimes a good indication of a gap in preparations or training, which is a good thing if you can pinpoint where that gap is--right now its telling me, it is your safe or your routine, not the firearm being Condition 1

please correct me if I am wrong or fill in the gaps...we are all trying to help
 
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