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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Forgive me if this was the topic of previous posts, but being new to the XD line I've got questions.

I recently purchased a new XDS .45 and prior to I did a little research (thats how I stumbled onto the forum) and saw a few places were folks and even the owners manual say not to lubricate the striker channel. Why is that?:confused:
 

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Forgive me if this was the topic of previous posts, but being new to the XD line I've got questions.

I recently purchased a new XDS .45 and prior to I did a little research (thats how I stumbled onto the forum) and saw a few places were folks and even the owners manual say not to lubricate the striker channel. Why is that?:confused:
2 reasons.
1) Fluid in the channel will resist the momentum of the striker, slowing it down. Kind of like a hydrolock thing.
2)Attracts dirt, causing same.

People that get oil in their striker channel tend to have light primer strikes, failing to fire.
I clean mine with non-chlorinated brake cleaner, leaves NO residue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
2 reasons.
1) Fluid in the channel will resist the momentum of the striker, slowing it down. Kind of like a hydrolock thing.
2)Attracts dirt, causing same.

People that get oil in their striker channel tend to have light primer strikes, failing to fire.
I clean mine with non-chlorinated brake cleaner, leaves NO residue.
Got it. Thanks!
 

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2 reasons.
1) Fluid in the channel will resist the momentum of the striker, slowing it down. Kind of like a hydrolock thing.
2)Attracts dirt, causing same.
^^^^^ What he said ^^^^^

Oil or grease will hold dirt and soon clog the channel. Simply clean the striker addn channel well and wipe completely dry before reassembling. To go further, don't drench the gun in oil. XDs run very well almost dry. I use just a toothpick point of white lithium grease at certain points where I see wear marks.
 

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I agree, had two failure to fires. When i investigated, i pulled the striker out and it was a mess. Cleaned and polished the striker, replace the spring (actually lost it so had to order a new one) then cleaned the channel. NO LUBE. Went to the range to day and fired the two FTFs from my earlier range visit and they worked just fine.
 

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did anybody notice factory grease in the striker channel when first new?


I just got my XD9 and am gonna degrease the slide internals before treating with froglube (except for the striker channel), but wondering if it is recommended to fully take down the striker.


Also heard the XD's like to run dry, so I dig that froglube keeps the piece dry (so to speak).
 

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What is good to prevent rust on the striker when polished? I have seen where a lot of people polish the striker or purchase the polished striker from PRP.
 

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Simply wipe some Eezox on it, and wipe it off. Or any other of your favorite Oil.

The KEY is "wiping it off." You wouldn't want to put it back in wet. Moisture from the oils will attract fouling, and will gunk up your striker channel.

There is really no need to polish a striker, (in my opinion) because it is really not tight fitting. There is a lil room in there. I've got several thousand rounds through several of my XDM's and there isn't much striker wear at all. :)


.
 

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did anybody notice factory grease in the striker channel when first new?
I don't have enough XDms to have a true sampling, but of the two I owned since-new (I have another that was new-to-me, so that doesn't count), it was variable.

I just got my XD9 and am gonna degrease the slide internals before treating with froglube (except for the striker channel), but wondering if it is recommended to fully take down the striker.
While you're at it, swap out the striker retaining pin for the PRP one. It's cheap insurance.

Also heard the XD's like to run dry, so I dig that froglube keeps the piece dry (so to speak).
Yes and no.

The XD and XDm (I can't speak for the XD-S) both will run just fine, "dry" - with little lube. They'll easily go a few hundred rounds before any noticeable signs of stoppages start cropping up, and that's if the gun gets *really* dirty. I'm not talking just some carbon-fouling from shooting the gun at the range: the XD/XDm can go thousands of rounds that way - I'm talking about actually getting sand/dirt/grit/debris in the gun. That kind of dirty. ;)

If you're going to use an XD or XDm as a true everyday carry, you can run it pretty dry, as this will help not attract as much dust-bunnies/lint, and will also prevent grease stains on your clothing.

If you're going to do a heavy-round-count training class or range-session, though, I'd recommend that you lube-up: as with many other firearms, the XD/XDm does not run nearly as well "dry and dirty" as it does "wet and dirty." In a hostile environment, high round-count, my experience has been that the XDm 3.8 Compact starts slowing down by about the 300-400 mark, and that the 4.5-inch models start doing the same by about 500-600 rounds.

I've had the chance to beat on my XDms a bit - ;):cool:

 

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^ NP. :)

I'm lucky in that I really get to abuse my range/training guns and find out what could potentially happen to my carry/defensive guns.

I'm just glad to pass along what little I've been able to learn first-hand. :)

Once it gets *that* dirty, failures-to-battery and stovepipes are what you'll see first (both of these are easy to remedy, and as many instructors like to remind students, once you start seeing failures-to-battery, be prepared for it to happen repeatedly) - a few hundred rounds later, you could start seeing double-feeds, too.

If I'm in the Zombie Apocalypse and I drop the gun in sand or I start having to roll around in the dirt like I did in that class (from which the gun's picture was taken, above - 6 days of abuse :lol:), I'll find a flowing stream or empty out a car's radiator on the gun so that I can just rinse out all the grit. At least then I know it'll take a few more hundred rounds before it starts boggin' down again.

FWIW, my carry gun, I run very much on the dry side. My reasoning is that it's very unlikely for me to actually get the gun as dirty as I did in that class - it's actually most unlikely that I'll even get it anywhere near that dirty. Instead, I want to make sure that I don't get grease stains on my clothing, and more importantly, don't attract any more dust-bunnies than I have to or potentially gum up the gun at the low temperatures we see here in the winter.

For high-round-count classes, my guns are "dripping wet." :lol:
 
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