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Any thoughts on SS barrels? They look good but I have heard they shoot out quicker that the standard Chromoly pencil barrels.
 

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The stainless steel barrel may be as good as the chrome lined chrome moly barrel. A big advantage of both is that you need not be overly concerned with frequent cleaning. This may have an advantage where environmental conditions outweigh cleaning frequency such as salt water, etc.

If you reach a very high round count, we were told that the chrome lined barrel may have some advantage. But we are speaking here of round counts in excess of 25,000. Both the SS and CLCM barrels will shoot out the throats eventually, combined with eventual crown cleaning wear.

Advantages for each? Dunno. If your barrel choice can not be addressed by chrome lining and can be with stainless steel, then I would choose the SS. Just me. Either one is excellent. Seems the best target barrels may be just chrome moly with no chrome lining. Accuracy vs. barrel life. HB of CJ (old coot)

How do you speel moly? Dunno that either. :)
 

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That would stand to reason considering their hardness. Better hope you get one that's good to go from the jump, I suppose. :D
 

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material doesn't necessarily effect accuracy in the material used with barrels. Of course Chrome Moly will last a lot longer than a Stainless barrel but we are talking about thousands and thousands of rounds later.

Now the heavier the barrel is, the more accurate it will be as it will not "whip" as much as a lighter profile barrel but keep in mind that a heavier barrel heats up faster than it can cool and a lighter barrel cools off faster than it can heat up. Heat will effect accuracy.
Now most people utilizing heavy barrels are not rapid firing their AR's...(I did say most :lol:) they are being more selective with their shots so in this case a heavy barrel won't heat up as much as someone running and gunning at a 3-gun competition.

Of course a barrel that is not chrome lined will be more accurate since chrome lining is impossible to apply and not end up with high an low spots in the chrome lining.
Stainless steel barrels do not need to be chrome lined as they already have corrosion resistant properties.

So that leaves you with a heavy non Chrome lined Chrome Moly barrel and a Stainless Steel heavy barrel.... Both will be just as accurate as the other however you will have to keep the Chrome Moly barrel clean and oiled to eliminate rust—that will definitely kill the accuracy of any barrel! :cool:
 

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7mm UM is a fairly rare chambering for an AR.


The cost of the barrel is pretty minimal compare to the cost of the ammo to shoot it out.

Give me an accurate barrel. I'll worry about getting a new one later on if that day ever comes to be.
 

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7mm UM is a fairly rare chambering for an AR.


The cost of the barrel is pretty minimal compare to the cost of the ammo to shoot it out.

Give me an accurate barrel. I'll worry about getting a new one later on if that day ever comes to be.
it was only said to illustrate the potentials.

and that's all true.
 

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Cross post only because it's the shop owner of ADCO.

My 18 month, 15K rounds SS barrel range report. - AR15.COM

Basically, his findings show "acceptable" accuracy for way longer than most people would think on a stainless barrel.

"Shot out" accuracy on a stainless barrel might be a lot lower round count on a match gun, but without hand loading every shot with a very talented trigger puller, I doubt many people would notice on a varmint rig, range toy or defensive gun.

Personally, I go with a stainless barrel whenever I can due to better corrosion resistance without the drawbacks of chrome lining, heavier profile, and slight gain in muzzle velocity.
 

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Hey, I'm kind of an "old coot" myself. I also an old coot who has built a bunch of ARs and who's done a bunch of precision rifle shooting.

Hard for me to tell in this thread who's speculating or at least making educated guesses, as opposed to who actually knows something, from experience, about barrels.

Anybody with enough keyboard acumen to understand how to Google would quickly realize that almost all match barrels have been stainless for a long time.

Don't know about anybody else's ACTUAL experience with chrome-lined barrels,, but I've seen two different Bushy Shorties with chrome-lined barrels shoot .5", five-shot groups @ 100 yds. Unless one's shooting benchrest, then maybe that's good enough accuracy?

A chrome-lined parkerized barrel is easier to clean and more corrosion-resistance than is a standard stainless barrel.

I've been using nitrocarbeurized barrels in some of my recent builds. They're accurate enough for my purposes, and, reportedly, will last longer than chrome-lined barrels.

To say that a heavier barrel will inherently be more accurate than a lighter barrel is fallacious. My first build employed a very heavy, bull 18" RRA barrel. It's plenty accurate. However, the lighter RRA NM barrel shoots AT LEAST as accurately as the aforesaid heavier barrel.

A heavier barrel will heat up slower and cool down slower than will a lighter barrel. While I'm blathering on so eloquently, let me further opine that fluting a barrel does not make a barrel stiffer or stronger. :mrgreen::mrgreen:
 

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To say that a heavier barrel will inherently be more accurate than a lighter barrel is fallacious. My first build employed a very heavy, bull 18" RRA barrel. It's plenty accurate. However, the lighter RRA NM barrel shoots AT LEAST as accurately as the aforesaid heavier barrel.

A heavier barrel will heat up slower and cool down slower than will a lighter barrel. While I'm blathering on so eloquently, let me further opine that fluting a barrel does not make a barrel stiffer or stronger.
Maybe if you had 2 barrel of exactly the same quality steel, run on the same machine, handled by the same technician, reamed to the exact same specifications, and polished to the same shine, you'd have a leg to stand on. You're comparing apples to oranges with your RRA bull bbl and your RRA NM bbl.

Heavy barrels heat up slower, yes, and cause less POI shift. However, these two are mostly unrelated. Heat can cause POI shift - differences in the metallic make-up of the barrel can cause different parts to expand and contract differently. Heavy barrels heat up slower because there is just more material to heat up. They also cool down slower because there is more material to cool. Fluting accomplishes 2 tasks - one, it provides more surface area to cool the bbl, and two, it saves weight.

The reason heavy bbls are more accurate is due to the amount of material on opposite sides of the bore. As force is applied from the ignition of powder, one side goes into compression, and the other is in tension. Thinner barrels (think pencil barrels, nearing minimum safe material limits) have less material to resist this force, so they flex more. Heavier barrels have much more material to resist the applied forces, so they flex less. The less the barrel flexes while the bullet is in the bbl, the more consistent results you will get. That's why you see BR shooters with very thick barrels. So yes, all things equal (rifling, chamber dimensions, material, etc), a heavier barrel WILL be more accurate. It's inherent in the heavy bbl because of less flex. Now comparing a PSA heavy barrel to a WOA or Kreiger lightweight bbl, now that's fallacious.

Think of it as trying to bend a sapling, and trying to bend an old tree. You can bend that sapling easily, but the old tree for the most part stays put.
 
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