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Discussion Starter #1
what is the difference between the two and are they dangerous. And what should you do if you have one. Also what can happen if you placed in backwards in a mag??????
 

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Squibs are rounds loaded with no powder or very little powder that will cause the bullet to get stuck in the barrel. If you fire a second round and have not cleared the barrel you can split the barrel or damage the gun. Duds?? There is no technical term for Duds, I guess you could call a dud a squib.

If you put a round in the mag backwards you will get a failure to feed. The round will not feed into the chamber backwards.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
what do you think of this, a comment made on a youtube video


"I generally refer to a squib as a case that didn't get any powder but the primer produces enough pressure to lodge the bullet in your barrel. If your hammer hits the primer and the bullet doesn't detonate, we call that a dud. In a normal range setting, you would set that bullet aside aimed downrange. What Mr. Smith is teaching here is combat shooting, in other words you couldn't care less about squibs or duds."
 

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what do you think of this, a comment made on a youtube video


"I generally refer to a squib as a case that didn't get any powder but the primer produces enough pressure to lodge the bullet in your barrel. If your hammer hits the primer and the bullet doesn't detonate, we call that a dud. In a normal range setting, you would set that bullet aside aimed downrange. What Mr. Smith is teaching here is combat shooting, in other words you couldn't care less about squibs or duds."
These definations are correct. A dud is a bullet that does nothing when the fireing pin hits the primer. It will dent the primer but not set it off. Duds are caused by faulty primers.
 

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could also be a light strike...
Still a "Dud"

Sometimes a light primer strike dud will fire on the second light primer strike.

The warning on duds is, wait 30 seconds with the gun pointed in a safe direction to se if it is a delayed fire before ejecting unless you have a second strike gun, then you can just pull the trigger the second time to see if it fires. If it does not fire, wait the 30 seconds.
 

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The accepted terminoloby is: misfire, hangfire, and squib.
 

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The accepted terminoloby is: misfire, hangfire, and squib.
Thanks, I was hoping someone would get that. Those are the acceptable terms as used in the NRA classes. "Dud" is like calling a magazine a clip or ammo bullets.;)
 

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Me, personally, I don't subscribe to the hangfire myth (unless I'm mucking about with a flintlock).

If I get a click when I'm expecting a BANG, it's immediate malfunction clearance time, no matter where I am.

TRB ASAP.

Sitting around with one's thumb up their nethers waiting for a hangfire which ain't gonna happen is a bad practice, whether on the range or on the street, as what you do in practice is what you do under stress.
 

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Me, personally, I don't subscribe to the hangfire myth (unless I'm mucking about with a flintlock).

If I get a click when I'm expecting a BANG, it's immediate malfunction clearance time, no matter where I am.

TRB ASAP.

Sitting around with one's thumb up their nethers waiting for a hangfire which ain't gonna happen is a bad practice, whether on the range or on the street, as what you do in practice is what you do under stress.
I agree, BUT, I have seen hangfires w/ magnum rounds using very slow powders, poor crimp, cold weather, below recommended charge wts, std primer instead of magnum, any & all can cause a hangfire in a magnum revolver or rifle round. I have had it happen to me, very creepy, but never in a service pistol round. So pistols get tap-rack after a failure to fire. It's almost always a bad primer strike. One does have to pay attention & know the diff between misfire & squib or the tap-rack is going to bite you big time.
 

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I agree, BUT, I have seen hangfires w/ magnum rounds using very slow powders, poor crimp, cold weather, below recommended charge wts, std primer instead of magnum, any & all can cause a hangfire in a magnum revolver or rifle round. I have had it happen to me, very creepy, but never in a service pistol round. So pistols get tap-rack after a failure to fire. It's almost always a bad primer strike. One does have to pay attention & know the diff between misfire & squib or the tap-rack is going to bite you big time.
True, but a squib usually isn't a click, it's usually an off-sound report(pop instead of bang) and an odd recoil sensation.

And I've yet to hear of TRB being prescribed for revolvers.;)

In short, with modern factory ammo in most centerfire pistol calibers, the odds of a hangfire are low enough I'd take my chances.

(But, yes, when my former 329 was having light primer strikes the first few times I shot it, it was sub-zero MN January temperatures, and I was very careful to give it a few seconds. Had it been a 80 degreee summer day, I wouldn't have hesitated to advance to the next round.)
 

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The accepted terminoloby is: misfire, hangfire, and squib.
Thanks, I was hoping someone would get that. Those are the acceptable terms as used in the NRA classes. "Dud" is like calling a magazine a clip or ammo bullets.;)
The point I was trying to get across. Thanks guys.
 

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True, but a squib usually isn't a click, it's usually an off-sound report(pop instead of bang) and an odd recoil sensation.

And I've yet to hear of TRB being prescribed for revolvers.;)

In short, with modern factory ammo in most centerfire pistol calibers, the odds of a hangfire are low enough I'd take my chances.

(But, yes, when my former 329 was having light primer strikes the first few times I shot it, it was sub-zero MN January temperatures, and I was very careful to give it a few seconds. Had it been a 80 degreee summer day, I wouldn't have hesitated to advance to the next round.)
Exactly true on all accounts. Still a concern for those w/ hearing issues or newbs to shooting. Many can't tell a squib from a misfire while wearing hearng protection. It's just something to be aware of, particularly those shooting bunnyfart loads where recoil & blast are minimal to start with.
 

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A "dud" can also be due to a primer that isn't fully seated, and the striker finishes the seating. The primer wasn't bad, it was the guy seating the primer in the case. (Ask me how I know this : ).

As far as removing it, I carry a brass rod for tapping a squib out of the barrel.

When I first started reloading I had a couple squibs. I've since changed my reloading methods to make this far less likely, but one thing I did was to create a couple squibs (no powder) on purpose to shoot and see how they sounded and felt.

I carried those intentional squibs in my pants pocket so they wouldn't be confused w/ regular rounds, then loaded them one at a time and shot them. I extracted the bullet from the barrel w/ the brass rod.
 

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A "dud" can also be due to a primer that isn't fully seated, and the striker finishes the seating. The primer wasn't bad, it was the guy seating the primer in the case. (Ask me how I know this : ).

As far as removing it, I carry a brass rod for tapping a squib out of the barrel.

When I first started reloading I had a couple squibs. I've since changed my reloading methods to make this far less likely, but one think I did was to create a couple squibs (no powder) on purpose to shoot and see how they sounded and felt.

I carried those intentional squibs in my pants pocket so they wouldn't be confused w/ regular rounds, then loaded them one at a time and shot them. I extracted the bullet from the barrel w/ the brass rod.
Again, why I don't shoot bunnyfart loads. If it goes bang & their is recoil, I know the bullet left the bbl. If they all go pooft, then you really have to be paying attention to avoid a KB from a squib, particularly in a revolver, but guys changing springs to run super soft loads in semiautos can still have a squib that runs the slide, very bad juju.
 
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