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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
This is my first post. I need to first say that I really enjoy browsing these forums. It has been a great influence in my choice of handgun. I will be buying my first handgun shortly. It will probably be an XD 5" Tactical in 9mm.
I had a few questions about the custom options I was hoping someone here could help with. Any input is really appreciated.

1. What is the Full Length Guide Rod? Will that include the little disc at the end of the guide rod like on the 4" model?

2. What is the High Hand Relief Modification to Frame?

3. What do they do to a barrel to Refit it for Match Grade Accuracy?

4. Any custom options that you just had to have on your XD, and would recommend?

Thanks in acvance for any input!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
that's not rude. It's a good point. I am looking for a description of what some of these modifications are. I don't plan on owning more than one firearm and am considering some basic modifications to personalize my gun.
I guess it's my fault for not clarifying: I do know how to shoot, I just have not purchased my own firearms yet. Looking for someone that knows a little more about these modifications.
Any info on this topic is welcome.
 

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I can't answer all of your questions. Perhaps a call to Springfield Armory is in order.
1-800-680-6866

You should consider what type of shooting you wish to do with your XD.

A match grade barrel on your first handgun is like putting racing tires on your kid's first car. The tires will make the kid no better a driver than the match grade barrel will make you a better shooter.

The XD is a reliable & affordable platform to start with. But you should get used to it in stock form before trying to figure out what mods are right for you.

You may be putting the cart before the horse.
 

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As far as the barrel, a match grade fitted barrel will have tighter tolerances than the original. This means slightly improved accuracy but also it will be much pickier about what ammo it will take. Not worth it IMO unless you are a serious competition shooter and you must have this edge.
 

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scurvyman said:
I don't plan on owning more than one firearm
BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

oh how little he knows how the bug will bite. :)

Scurvy,

If you want the factory warranty, then when you decide to pay for the custom work, go to SA, however, if you want a well fit, butter smooth running pistol at a better price than there add ons, give Rich at Canyon Creek a shout.

That being said, I agree w/ the other folks who are telling you to learn how to shoot properly w/ a box stock gun. W/o that, you will not truly understand how these custom gimmicks affect your shooting.
 

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I agree with everyone here. Get a stock, out of the box XD and shoot the heck out of it. Then after you've shot it a lot you'll develop your own opinions on things that you really like about the gun and maybe some things that you might want to try to improve upon on it.

I wouldn't mess with any of the things in your post. They're just not worth it IMO. I would recommend the stainless guide rod, and a slide refinishing. Those are pretty standard things. Also you might want to shoot some other guns that have different sights on them and get an idea of some different sights that you might like better than the stock sights. After you've shot it a bunch you might decide to do the trigger job from canyon creek. I don't know what it feels like because I don't have one, but I've read a lot of great things about it. There's different things you can do to the grips based on your preference also. Maybe a light or a lasermax if you want to shell out the dough for it.

I would stay away from any kind of match grade barrel and any cutting of the frame. It probably won't help you and will just cost a lot of money. And you can't buy just one, just to let you know.
 

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I'd add that you should get a 9mm, since ammo for a nine costs about half what ammo for any of the other varieties will run you. You also won't be worrying about picking up brass off the floor at the range, since it'll be so cheap.

Stick to simple stuff, and later on, if you're still big on it, start getting fancy.

T
 
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