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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a couple questions about this rifle. It was handed down to my father from my grandfather and now is going to be mine. My question is, what can be used to get light surface rust off of this gun? There is a little bit down the barrel and a tiny bit in the bolt action. Second question is, if it functions properly is there any harm in shooting this? Or is it best left on a rack or in the safe?
 

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Its more commonly called the Krag...I am guessing that this is what you're asking about? 30-40 caliber with the side loading box magazine...right?

As long as you have it checked out and everything is good and tight...I think you'd be safe to shoot it with standard pressure ammo. The 30-40 Krag is not quite in the 8x57/30-06 power class and more in the 300 Savage/303 British power class. Ammo is still made by Remington and Winchester. I would have no qualms about poping a whitetail or wild pig with this caliber as long as you're around 100-150 yards at max.

The 1998 Krag bolt action was the US's first modern military issue boltgun. It went with Teddy Roosevelt and his "Roughriders" up San Juan Hill in Cuba, during the Spanish-American War and is a very historically important rifle. It was replaced in 1903, by the more powerful and more accurate M1903 Springfield and the immortal 30-06 caliber.

The Krag gets its name from the Danish Krag-Jorgensen rifle action that it comes from. The Norweigans and Danes used these rifles for a very long time. The correct caliber designation is "30-40 Krag" if you go looking for ammo. It comes from the old way of naming cartridges - 30 caliber bullet, backed by 40 grains of powder. Again...its a caliber that is over 100 years old.

The Krag is fun to shoot and does not have alot of recoil. The bolt cocks on closing (like the Swede Mausers and British Lee Enfield) and is fast and smooth. Accuracy was not as good as the 93 Mauser it went up against in Cuba or the M1903 that replaced it, but about as good as any 30-30 lever action of the times.

The only downfall of the Krag, was the fact that it only has one locking lug on the rear of the bolt. Make damn sure that this lug is NOT cracked or stressed in any way and you should be fine to shoot it. The Krag design was not as strong as the 93 or 98 Mauser or M1903 Springfield but it was fine for the lower pressure 30-40 Krag round that it launched.

As far as removing rust...be very careful. You can turn a nice collectable into a shooter/beater real fast i you try to "improve" its looks too much. Try some #0000 steel wool coated with Break Free and rub lightly and don't go too fast or hard. Only remove what might become pitting later on. Good honest wear or patina (dont confuse patina with rust....they're different!) will NOT hurt the value of the Krag.

Congrats on the rifle....I always wanted a nice Krag. A friend of mine has one and I have shot it several times and its big fun. Just remember that its an older design and meant for only low pressure, original spec rounds.

Hope this helps...

- brickboy240
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok well just rubbing down the barrel with normal hoppes #9 and some oil makes it look brand new. Yes it is the one with the side loading magazine. I do not have a magazine for it though. From what I have read some of them are made to just be fired single shot only? So I don't know if that is this particularly but I can always open the bolt and load a round and fire it. I will post some pictures shortly here of the action because I am not sure what is on it and if it will ever affect the rifle. The side of the bolt that was inside when it is closed was similar to the outside but it wiped right off. The exposed side when the action is closed seems to not come clean from wiping. The action is very smooth so I assume it is not affecting the operation at all right now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Ok so I found out I have a friend who collects old guns like this so I am going to have him look it over and see if he thinks its ok to fire. Do you think I should pay a gun smith to look at it and verify it anyways? I really don't know where to take it locally. All I have around me is a Gander Mountain that i know of for a gun smith and I am not sure on the reputation of them.

Anyways here are the pics I promised. Let me know if the bolt looks ok or if I should try cleaning it. Its the red orange color to it that you see when it is closed.















 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ok so forgive me for my lack of knowledge on terms to use, I am not sure if it is all the same as a pistol and I am not familiar with rifles at all. My dad thinks the firing pin may have been removed? I see when i open the action and look at the end where it would hit the round I cannot see anything that will strike the round. There is a hole in the top of the bolt and I can see somethign inside there but when I cycle the bolt it goes away and when I pull the trigger i see it again and however long that may be it would not reach the catridge. When I open the action I cannot see anythin out at all since it is would you say cocking the gun?? Not sure how to desribe that. Anyways how can I verify that this has a firing pin and can sucessfully shoot a round.
 

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I just picked up whats left of what I think is the carbine version of this fine weapon from my brother. It has been missing in inaction for around 20 years. There is a good bit of rust on it and the stock is missing.
So much for a decent collectors item:-:)x:-(!!
Does anyone know where I can obtain a manual for this gun? Also I would love to get another stock for it but I imagine that an original would be both expensive and hard to come by.
Every thing APPEARS to work on it but I would like a manual before I disassemble it so I can put all the peices back together correctly.
Any help would be greatly appreciated. TIA


xdm 9mm blk on blk
 

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Ok so forgive me for my lack of knowledge on terms to use, I am not sure if it is all the same as a pistol and I am not familiar with rifles at all. My dad thinks the firing pin may have been removed? I see when i open the action and look at the end where it would hit the round I cannot see anything that will strike the round. There is a hole in the top of the bolt and I can see somethign inside there but when I cycle the bolt it goes away and when I pull the trigger i see it again and however long that may be it would not reach the catridge. When I open the action I cannot see anythin out at all since it is would you say cocking the gun?? Not sure how to desribe that. Anyways how can I verify that this has a firing pin and can sucessfully shoot a round.

most of these 30-40 krags were sportized,(meaning the forearm stock was cut off and some times the barrel shortened to make the rifle handle easier in the woods) after WWI and most straight stock military models like yours are difficult to find.
you have a real historical rifle there.
enjoy it.
cheers,
sewerman
 

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Actually, the magazine is fixed to the rifle. You just open the side door and literally dump the rounds in and close it. The thing feeds beautifully.

Here is a link to more info on this neat and very historically important rifle.

Collecting and Shooting the Military Surplus Rifle (2005) - Surplusrifle.com


Man...I wish somebody had left me a nice Krag! LOL

- Brickboy240
Thanks for that link Brickboy!!!:-D Not only did I find out about the history of the Krag, I also found a couple of manuals for it:-D:-D:-D

Now if I could just find an original stock to put it back into:cry:
 

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Thanks for that link Brickboy!!!:-D Not only did I find out about the history of the Krag, I also found a couple of manuals for it:-D:-D:-D

Now if I could just find an original stock to put it back into:cry:
U.S. Military | KRAG 1898 | e-GunParts.com

Skimming through, it looked like everything was listed as available to piece together a stock for an old 1898. Whether everything is in stock is an entirely different issue.
 

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Thanks dude.:-D
 

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If you search aroun on Gunbroker and other sites...I'l bet you can find a stock set.

Have a smith check the locking lug on the bolt...that is the Achilles heel of the Krag. If that checks out and the bore is good and everything locks up tight...you are probably safe to shoot it. Keep in mind that the 30-40 Krag round is not a super high pressure round and is like a lighter 303 British or light 300 Savage...not in the 308/30-06 class.

It might have been a military flop, but a Krag is fun to shoot. The bolt cocks on closing like the Swede Mauser and Lee Enfield and has a short throw. Its a very fast bolt to shuck and next to the No4 Lee Enfield, its one of the fastest military boltguns to operate.

Part of the percieved "flop" of the Krag was not only its one locking lug but mainly because its first real fight was against the excellent Spanish 93 Mauser in 7x57mm in Cuba. The 93 Mauser and the 7x57mm round were both MUCH better than the Danish Krag action and the 30-40 round.

Clean it up but don't go too nuts removing the patina... too much cleaning will only devalue the rifle.

- brickboy240
 
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