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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How'd this happen? This was a 9mm reload 115gr plated round nose at 1.100 with 4.7 grains of Winchester 231. Im fairly new to reloading I've only reloaded a couple thousand rounds. I've never seen this before.
1414974085034.jpg
 

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Wait for the reloading authorities.
 

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Does this happen to be ammoland or ammoload brass?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Actually yes, it was originally new 9mm from freedom. So this would be the first re load in that case.
 

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There are way more people on this forum that should be answering, but I want to toss my idea out and see how far off I am when they show up....lol

Could this be the result of too tight of a taper crimp combined with a weak case? It looks like the case split right where the base of a 115gr RN would sit when seated correctly. That might account for how uniform the split is all the way around the case if it opened up at the base of the projectile? I have no clue. The logical side of my brain is yelling that you would experience a case head separation before the case would split like that...so idk...

I'm sure the reloading gurus will want more info, so make sure you post up the type of brass this is and how many times it's been fired (or is this a random range pickup? If so I'd say that's your answer...) and anything else you can think of.

Subscribed for results.
 

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Ammoload cases have a thicker wall towards the bottom of the case. I don't know if that is for reinforcement or for seating depth consistency out of the factory. As you can see right where the split is, is where the case gets thicker. My guess would be a combination of a hot load (Are you loading them fast/hot/towards the max grains allowed for your powder?) as well as a defect in the case i.e thin wall where the case begins getting thicker.

I could be way off but that is just my thought fwiw.
 

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Not towards the top of the spectrum, I'm leaning towards a case with a manufacturer's defect. Not sure how the OP could crimp enough to cause that failure - a plated bullet would be resized by the crimper before the case would be damaged in such a manner.
 

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I haven't reloaded any of the ammoload brass I pick up from the range just because of the thicker wall in the bottom. I don't know what it would do as far as case capacity goes as well as maybe having issues seating to the correct depth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
4.8 grains is the maximum suggested load for the powder according to hodgons website. Most rounds I've re loaded I don't even crimp. If it was one of the few hundred that were its a very light crimp. The crimp didn't seem to change the mouth of the case much, so I stopped doing it.
 

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When I have time tomorrow and if I remember, I'll put up the max load data from all the reloading manuals I've got. Sierra lists around 5.3gr as max with jacketed bullets in the 115gr range, so I'd think you weren't pushing it.
 

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I too have wondered about the reload-ability of those cases with the thicker and thinner case walls as were referred to above. I have never used any of them, but I do wonder just how the internal ridge is formed when the case is made. When dealing with pressures like these rounds produce any anomalies or inconsistencies in case wall thickness could put pressure right were you don't want it. This could just be an odd occurrence, but the possibility of having something fouling the chamber when a new round comes up is unsettling. I certainly would not use these in any critical loadings like self defense ammo, and if you don't have a bunch of them I would personally not be inclined to use them. I am thinking that this might be relative to where a particular speed of powder produces peak pressure, though a weak case is a weak case and would break regardless of some of the other variables.

I am curious about where you found the upper part of the case. Did it remain in the gun? Did a new round get hung up on it and pull the piece out when you extracted the new round? Did you notice a difference in smoke from the chamber and the feel of the round that separated when fired? I know other people are reloading these cases and so I am trying to get a picture of the things someone should look for should this happen again. Hopefully you are not using a Lee FCD which might also put some tension on the weak spot in the case when reloading.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The piece remained in the chamber, the next round obviously wouldn't feed. I went home after that andtook down the pistol. Went back to the range and found the base of the case. I load on a single stage Redding, with lee 9mm dies.
 

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Keep in mind that those cases have less powder capacity than do other cases and may produce abnormally high pressures if loaded with the same data as other cases.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Happened again. This time loaded to 4.6 grains of Winchester 231. This was once fired brass. Do you have case capacity specs turkey?
 

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Wow. I've been reloading since 1978 and never seen a pistol case do that (rifle case either for that matter). My 9MM cases haven't been reloaded more than 3 or 4 times each (the ones used the most) but I have .45 acp cases and .357 an .44 magnum cases that have been loaded 10 to 15 times or more over the years.

I've had them split at the case mouth (when fired, when belled, when crimped). I've seen them split down the side, either from the case mouth down a half inch or so, or in the middle from just short of the case mouth back towards the rim anywhere from a half inch to 3/4", but never seen a "case head separation" like some folks report on rifle cases.

Hope you figure it out.
 

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It has happened to me exactly once in more than 250K rds loaded over the years. It was a 357sig in a Glock, handloaded warm but not max. I suspect a bad piece of brass, **** happens.
 

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Yeah, but now the OP has had two of these cases split in half with different loads. I think it's time to forget these cases and sell them to the scrap man. Granted, one man's results are not the end of it, but obviously, with his set up, his experience is not a good one with these cases.
 

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I have had case separation with rifle rounds on several occasions. This is a 308 Winchester case. It is not as exciting as a split base.

The 9mm cases with the band inside do have less powder capacity. I filled a standard case and a case with a band with powder and then weighed both amounts of powder. I don't remember the exact numbers, but you can easily do it yourself.
 

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I have had case separation with rifle rounds on several occasions. This is a 308 Winchester case. It is not as exciting as a split base.

The 9mm cases with the band inside do have less powder capacity. I filled a standard case and a case with a band with powder and then weighed both amounts of powder. I don't remember the exact numbers, but you can easily do it yourself.
I wonder if you know the cause of the .308 separation?

Since many of us do not have any of the Ammoland type cases, it would be informative if you could do your weight test again if possible. A difference of say, a quarter to an half grain, would be more than enough to cause concern. You could also fill the cases with water and weigh that which avoids the problem of different powder densities and "settling" which would give different results almost every time you try it. Either way would provide some data though.
 

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I happened to have H335 on my bench at the time of the test and found that an Ammoland case held 14.2 grains while a Winchester held 14.6 grains.
 
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