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Discussion Starter #1
Well it took me 3.5 hours, but the action on my new 2.25" SP101 .357 feels like glass :D The trigger is still 14# (got a Wilson Combat spring set in the mail), but it's a SMOOTH 14#! After getting her home last week, I dry fired the hell out of her before putting 200 rds through her at the range over the weekend. After blasting off a mix of .38s and .357s and feeling the friction behind that trigger pull, I planned the next order of business... Action Job!

This being the first time I've torn apart an SP101, I consulted a couple threads for disassembly pointers. Apparently people posting on the subject have a real hard time with disassemble and reassembly of the trigger assembly. To be honest, it was cake!! All i used was a jeweler's screwdriver to manipulate pins and such. Anyone looking to do it, definitely should not be scared of the trigger assembly. Anyway... after it was all apart I hit all the typical surfaces using the dremel tool: trigger, trigger plunger, sear, misc. pin holes, hammer, hammer pivot assembly. Even took care of the areas on the inside of the frame where the ends of the trigger assembly pins wear...

First I hit all extremely rough surfaces with a SS wire brush wheel to take off any prominent imperfections in the machining. Then ALL of the above parts got hit with the rubber polishing bit. This refined the surfaces making everything relatively smoother. Finally, using a soft polishing bit and Dremel polishing compound (you can also use Flitz or rouge), I buffed everything to a mirror-like shine. All parts came out great. Then before assembling it all back together I went ahead and chamfered all my cylinder chambers ;)

Everything went back together great! No fight from the trigger assembly! I just can't wait to get it back to the range this weekend. She feels amazing. Now if the mailman can only hurry up with those springs...
 

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Discussion Starter #2
A job like this isn't hard to do yourself, and with practice, your action can turn out just as clean and smooth as any gunsmith can make it. What you need:

Dremel
- Stainless Steel Brush (#530)
- Rubber Polishing Cone Point (#462)
- Felt Polishing Cone (#422)
- Mandrel (#401)
- Polishing Compound (#421) (Or equal: Flitz, rouge, etc...)

Other
- Jeweler's screwdriver
- Medium screwdriver
- 3 in 1 Oil (You'll want to lube it up upon reassembly)


Simple.
 

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I recommend not using a dremel, but if you stopped in time, then good job! A dremel can very easily and quickly go too far.

It's amazing what a little action polishing will do to a ruger revolver. Mine is a GP100, but there's not much difference between that and the SP101 as far as action is concerned.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I recommend not using a dremel, but if you stopped in time, then good job! A dremel can very easily and quickly go too far.

It's amazing what a little action polishing will do to a ruger revolver. Mine is a GP100, but there's not much difference between that and the SP101 as far as action is concerned.
Very correct! I should have added that things can go wrong fast using a dremel if you are not careful. Remember you are polishing, NOT SANDING. Gunsmithing runs in the family and I've had ample amount of experience using a dremel, but if you are at all uncomfortable using one, practice on something else before touching your gun :) Thanks cce1302!
 

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Nice! Even more manly is running 200 rounds through that bad boy in one weekend! I know after about 25 rounds of .38+P in my 442 my hand is feeling it!
 

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the SP101 is honestly a very light shooting snubby.

I could easily run that many if I had the time and money.

I need to slick the trigger up on mine as well.

You definitely know you're shooting magnums in it, but they're not unpleasant or uncontrollable by any means.
 
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