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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went shooting last week and cleaned my two XD's this morning. I know I am new at it and have yet to get into a good rhythm/process but it took me approx 45 minutes each to clean them. How long should this take to field strip, clean with solvent, lubricate, and reassemble? Anyone have any tips to speed up the process?
 

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Your supposed to clean them??
All kidding aside, I just field strip, bore snake the bbl a couple of times, wipe off dust or residue with a rag, lightly oil and re-assemble. Took me longer to type this. :D If it’s Really grungy, yeah I’ll take more time but they really don’t need allot of maintenance, hence the name Extreme Duty.
 

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The last time I cleaned mine, it took about an hour. But I ended up pulling the trigger out and some internal pieces, as it was so dirty the trigger had some issues resetting. Typically takes about 10 minutes or so, like hngnhunter said field strip, bore brush, couple of patches, and some light oil and it’s good to go.


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For only a field strip and clean - 5 minutes.

Deeper, more detail = more time.
 

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My thought is--if you're having to learn HOW to do the thing WHILE you're doing the thing, then it's gonna take longer, whatever "it" is.
 

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Typically 10 minutes, and most of that is just letting the solvent do its job.

Again, dirtier / longer between cleanings = more time.
 

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I clean it after I shoot it. If it's a carry gun I clean it sometimes between shooting it (gets pretty dirty sometimes with all the outside work I do/what I do).

I'm not a bit interested in waiting till it begins to malfunction to tell me it should be cleaned.

How long does it take? Depends on how dirty it is. How clean is it when I'm done? Not perfect, that's for sure. Doesn't have to perfect to be protected from corrosion, additional wear and to insure proper function the next time (whenever that might be) I want to shoot it.

As others said, field strip it. Get some cleaning solvent in the barrel with a patch and let it soak while you wipe/brush off/out the slide, the frame, the recoil spring/guide and wipe off the magazines you used (and load them up again if that's what you do).

When everything is done I go back to clean the barrel with a brush/solvent/patches. I like to get it spotless but I've had times when I didn't. I'm shooting less and less uncoated lead bullets these days but I still grab a box now and then. Some pistols just get dirtier with lead and require more effort/time to get clean. If I finally give up some evening on a barrel I'll get it back out within a few days and work on it some more. I have some pistols that come clean after lead with a couple patches. I have others (with the same ammo) that almost always have lead deposits stuck here and there. Difference in barrel internal finish/clearances which vary gun to gun.

Some cleaning solvents are better for certain issues than others. I've used Hoppe's #9 for years (decades, really) and it's fine for most cleaning needs. About a year ago a buddy suggested something called Bore Tech Eliminator for the copper deposits in the barrels. Sometimes you can't see it with your eyes but when you put that stuff on a patch you can see it when it comes out of the other end of the barrel. Takes a few patches and maybe some brushing (with a nylon brush - BTE eats the brass brushes, too) and the barrel is now cleaner than you thought it was to start with. I don't use that much, but when I do, it gets the residue from the bullet jackets out.

Got some Bore Tech Eliminator Rimfire formula awhile back for lead residue in the barrels. Didn't work nearly as well as the copper solvent version.

I will also recommend that when you clean the barrel you work from the chamber end and push the crud you are trying to remove from the chamber to the muzzle. You want it out, right? Why push it from the muzzle to the chamber? And then have a harder time getting the chamber clean.

Once it's clean I start lubing (drop of oil here and there on the wear points) and put it back together. Then I load it (if it's a pistol I keep loaded. Then I wipe it off with an oily cloth to get some rust protection on the sides, frame pins, etc. I hate rust. The way I sweat this time of the year I can get rust started in 3 or 4 days easy if I don't keep them wiped off (the one I carry all the time.)

Good luck with your XD.
 

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Milspec white glove clean? Depends on the armorer. Took me 6 hours to clean my M16 to pass the glove test.

It really depends on how clean YOU want it.
 
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Agree with others, depends how anal u are with cleaning. I tend to take quite a bit of time to clean as well.
 

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I went shooting last week and cleaned my two XD's this morning. I know I am new at it and have yet to get into a good rhythm/process but it took me approx 45 minutes each to clean them. How long should this take to field strip, clean with solvent, lubricate, and reassemble? Anyone have any tips to speed up the process?
45 minutes sounds about right. Some firearms take longer to clean than others tho.
 

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Maybe 10 mins for me also. No reason to do a full detailed take down and cleaning everytime. I do the same thing with any pistol. Field strip, remove the barrel. Spray it down. Set it to the side and wipe off the lower and slide while the barrel soaks. Wipe the barrel down.. Then I run a few wet patches down the barrel till they come out pretty much clean. Then I run one or two dry patches down the barrel. Reassemble the slide and I put a small drop of oil on the slide rails. Put it back together and run the slide several times and wipe off any oil from the outside of the gun.

Been doing it the same way for 20 years and I still have the first pistol I bought when I was 21. It's had 1000s of rounds through it and it still shoots and looks good. It's a gen 3 glock 17 all original other then recoil spring.

Side note when I was a kid my dad would detail his truck every weekend. My uncle would quick wash his every now and then. Come time to trade my dad had actually ruined the clear coat on his truck by wearing it off. My uncles truck still looked brand new once it was cleaned up. They were the exact same year model. Lol more isn't always better. If you are constantly scrubbing something you will increase wear. Taking out pins and detail stripping a firearm often will loosen every thing up.
 

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EDC Springfield XDE 45. Beretta PX4 40 and 45, Compact 9mm. Sig P-220 10mm, NAA 22-mag revolver.
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I went shooting last week and cleaned my two XD's this morning. I know I am new at it and have yet to get into a good rhythm/process but it took me approx 45 minutes each to clean them. How long should this take to field strip, clean with solvent, lubricate, and reassemble? Anyone have any tips to speed up the process?
Take however much time you feel you need. There’s no time limit. Cleaning a gun can be very therapeutic and it also just furthers your familiarity with your pistol

Even if I haven’t shot in a long time and I’m just cleaning my pistol just from carrying it every day, I can easily spend upwards of a half hour cleaning it.


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XDM 4.5" 9mm 19rd
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the comments. Both my XD's are carry guns but I am carrying the 3" sub-compact more often this time of year due to the clothing I am wearing for the heat. So both guns accumulate a lot of dust/lint from my clothing. I also carry my 3" with me running sometimes in the front pocket of my running pack so it gets a lot of sweat on it. I immediately clean off the sweat after a run but I know I need to do a better job refreshing the oil.

So if I go to the range monthly on average and put 50-100 rounds through each gun, should I be OK doing a deep clean a couple times per year and just a quick clean after each range visit? I know the answers are going to vary with everyone's personal preference. I am using Hoppe's solvent and oil but is there a spray I can use for a quick clean/lube? I don't want to take shortcuts but I also do not want to get lazy after a range visit due to the hassle of a deep clean.
 

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For only a field strip and clean - 5 minutes.

Deeper, more detail = more time.
^ This is what I subscribe to as well.

The right solvents, cleaning tools - and don't forget proper PPE - makes the job much more efficient.

As you gain more experience, you'll understand better what parts require more attention, and also what components you should be paying more attention to (not necessarily one and the same).

Cleaning modern duty/service/defensive-grade firearms isn't so much about getting them clean as it is allowing for the end-user to visualize crucial areas for visual "Limited Technical Inspections" of critical components.
 

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I went shooting last week and cleaned my two XD's this morning. I know I am new at it and have yet to get into a good rhythm/process but it took me approx 45 minutes each to clean them. How long should this take to field strip, clean with solvent, lubricate, and reassemble? Anyone have any tips to speed up the process?
Shoot more, and clean more

You'll learn how to be more efficient. You'll know how much time to spend where and with what tool.
 

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it's a labor of love.
don't worry about it, just get it right.
personally, i enjoy the cleaning process much as punching holes in paper..
 

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1. Amazon/others will sell you a cleaning pad (think mouse pad) of parts illustrated
2. While at the range, when done shooting a gun, field dress it a) best bore snake, b) best silicone cloth that really gets into the slide grooves, et al. (If there's a long line for your spot, do this in the car)
3. Get your home cleaning kit down to Spartan goods & assembled in a basket, work table fronting TV
4. Hickok45 videos might give more tips .... e.g. he loves rubbing alcohol and not much else https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvB3solmhqtgDeLpD-yTtfg
 

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Good lord, shoot the gun about 3k rounds, spend twenty minutes cleaning it and repete.
Those that waste time cleaning guns every time they shoot, must not shoot very often.
 

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I went shooting last week and cleaned my two XD's this morning. I know I am new at it and have yet to get into a good rhythm/process but it took me approx 45 minutes each to clean them. How long should this take to field strip, clean with solvent, lubricate, and reassemble? Anyone have any tips to speed up the process?
Hey, chill out. You're doing okay.

I generally only clean my firearms 2-3 times a year, so when I do clean them I like to be thorough.

What I do is set my stuff up and do my cleaning while watching TV -- usually a good movie. I might take 3 hours to clean 3-4 handguns, but I'm not trying to rush it. Enjoy the movie and the cleaning experience. It's relaxing.

For a quick clean at the range I can do a credible job with a snake bore (or whatever they call them) and a few q-tips and cotton balls. After a long range day and I need a clean firearm for the next day, I can take maybe 10-12 minutes.

The important point is to clean where needed and lube, but not OVER-lube. Too much lube in the firearm only attracts more gunk, residue and dirt.

FYI: Someone commented above about not running weapons dirty until they malfunction. I actually do that intentionally, every year, with at least my home defense and carry firearms. I do keep those clean, but during my summer shooting league, I intentionally run them dirty until they malfunction...because I want to learn to recognize the symptoms of when a firearms is becoming unreliable.
  • If you've done this routine a few times, you do start picking up little tell-tales. The slides gets just a little harder to rack, the triggers starts to feel just a bit squishy (even a powder river trigger).
  • You pretty quickly learn to recognize the tell-tales.
  • And I submit that is a valuable skill to learn, against they day you might be in high-tempo extended situations and need to be able to perceive when your firearm is nearing the low-reliability phase.
  • Better to recognize the symptoms and know when you NEED to get to a safe spot for some quick cleaning, than to unintentionally run to failure in the middle of a tense situation.
Just the way I do it. Do whatever works best for YOU!

Jim
 

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^ @RusherJim captured really well what I do, too.

My replies in this thread to BassCliff should also help you get a peek in to my thinking, and what's more, there's some good external links there to help you really take the gun all the way apart, should you choose to do so: Cleaning New Pistol Before Range Time

So if I go to the range monthly on average and put 50-100 rounds through each gun, should I be OK doing a deep clean a couple times per year and just a quick clean after each range visit? I know the answers are going to vary with everyone's personal preference. I am using Hoppe's solvent and oil but is there a spray I can use for a quick clean/lube? I don't want to take shortcuts but I also do not want to get lazy after a range visit due to the hassle of a deep clean.
This thread should help you understand my point-of-view, where it comes to the how's/why's of cleaning:


Hope this helps expand a bit more on my previous reply! :)
 
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