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Discussion Starter #1
I have been doing a little reading on how to properly hold a gun (on my first trip to the firing range I just held it however felt natural).

My question is how should my body stance be? Shoulders square to the target? Body slightly rotated looking down the strong arm?

Just practicing holding the gun in my room shoulders square is very uncomfortable to me (this could be because I have only shot rifles and I'm use to one arm being somewhat extended). I'm trying to become comfortable with the 'combat grip' and everyday it seems to be a little more comfortable. I think I will find I have much more control of the gun.

Also everyone shoot with both eyes open correct? I keep closing one eye which is habit I need to break.

Anyways any tips/hints/pictures would be awesome.
 

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I found the Isosceles a better stance for learning. Mainly because every time you step up to the firing line and get into the stance, it will be the same stance. Feet shoulder width apart, even with each other. The Weaver is harder to do exactly the same all the time. Eventually, stance becomes less important but it's good to stay consistent while your upper body learns to shoot.
 

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It all depends on what you're training for and what you're shooting. In the USMC we shoot as square to the target as possible, to maximize the use of our ESAPI plates. Usually, even when in body armor I shoot with my body slightly rotated strong side to the rear, feet shoulder-width apart with my strong side foot staggered slightly behind my weak side foot. I also tend to bend slightly forward at the waist and sometimes feel myself bring my shoulders up closer to my neck. I keep both of my elbows bent slightly, but that's up to you and how you hold the weapon. I also keep both of my feet pointed a little inward so that if I needed to I could drop my center of mass and kick off to start moving in any direction. This has taken 6 years of combat training and shooting to refine but it works great for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well I feel like a noob for not searching a bit more but I foudn this sticky in the sticky section. It has some good info. I'm still curious on more peoples take on it as well though. Thanks for the response so far.

My first outing I had my feet shoulder width apart but angled with my right foot up front (stance as if I was surfing I suppose). I'm left handed so my left arm was completely straight while my right arm was somewhat bent. I think I was over muscling the gun as I felt almost fatigued after shooting (or maybe it was just the nerves of shooting for the first time?).

Ghost: Sorry to sound like a noob but what are ESAPI plates?


**The stickied Thread in case someone else runs into this thread**
http://www.xdtalk.com/forums/latest-hs2000-sa-xd-faq-stickies/9822-helpful-info-new-shooters.html
 

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It all depends on what you're training for and what you're shooting. In the USMC we shoot as square to the target as possible, to maximize the use of our ESAPI plates. Usually, even when in body armor I shoot with my body slightly rotated strong side to the rear, feet shoulder-width apart with my strong side foot staggered slightly behind my weak side foot. I also tend to bend slightly forward at the waist and sometimes feel myself bring my shoulders up closer to my neck. I keep both of my elbows bent slightly, but that's up to you and how you hold the weapon. I also keep both of my feet pointed a little inward so that if I needed to I could drop my center of mass and kick off to start moving in any direction. This has taken 6 years of combat training and shooting to refine but it works great for me.
This is exactly how I stand and it works great for me.
 

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As for your stance, either the Weaver stance or the Isosceles stance are acceptable as a base stance. People will argue over which is better, but the one you shoot best with is the one to use.

The Weaver stance has you standing slightly side on to the target and looking down your strong arm, both arms slightly bent and providing a push/pull tension. Your strong foot is back. Sort of like a boxer stance or rifle stance.

The Isosceles Stance has your shoulders squared to the target, both arms fully extended. and your feet are shoulder width apart and may have the strong foot back a little.

I personally use the Modified Weaver stance (the Weaver, but with the strong arm locked out straight) as my base stance.

Once you get proficient at the basic stance you should practice shooting from several positions. (sitting, moving, prone, etc.)

Have fun!!
 

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The Isosolese stance is a good competition stance but for fighting, I use a modified weaver. Very similar to a boxers stance. In retention and disarm training folks using hte iso stance tend to get disarmed more often. Their arms are fully extended and their feet are side by side... lousy base for retention. From a fighters stance you can easily yank backwards and rotate your torso, pulling back and down...

The boxers stance (modified weaver) seems more natural for shooting and scooting. Getting of the X is going to be very important to your survivial.

Lots of folks will argue this, and some excellent shooters use iso or square to the target. I don't wear armor, I want to be able to shoot and scoot, and I worry about retention. Modified weaver works best for me.
 

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A strong stance. Many people make up very unstable platforms, whatever you do, do it strong. Look at a basketball player playing defense or a couple wrestlers facing up they have strong stances that allow the participants to move in any direction quickly and with power.

A true Weaver stance limits your range of motion severely, so you don't see it used much in action shooting. True Iso is fine for a start position, but you seldom shoot in true Iso during a action pistol stage, but it is a good base, as it is very flexible and strong.
 

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A strong stance. Many people make up very unstable platforms, whatever you do, do it strong. Look at a basketball player playing defense or a couple wrestlers facing up they have strong stances that allow the participants to move in any direction quickly and with power.

A true Weaver stance limits your range of motion severely, so you don't see it used much in action shooting. True Iso is fine for a start position, but you seldom shoot in true Iso during a action pistol stage, but it is a good base, as it is very flexible and strong.
I believe someone here posted that the Weaver is no longer being taught in many instances because when real life video is reviewed, no matter HOW much training the shooter/officer has had, in a stress situ they go to the squared-up iso stance.
 
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