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Discussion Starter #1
I put a post in the non-xd section about a new colt 1911 I acquired. I got a reply about misfires on series 70s because I stated that I might ccw it sometimes.

The poster stated that his series 70 1911 would sometimes fire when he flipped the safety off. It went in for repair and they replaced the sear to resolve the issue but he doesn't trust it for ccw.

The Colt Gunsite Pistol has a McCormick hammer and sear.

My question is... should I ccw a series 70? I currently ccw a xd9sc. I thought that I needed a small gun to ccw, but I don't think that anymore. I think I could get away with a 1911 and nobody would ever notice.
 

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If the trigger group is within spec, the 1911 will be as safe as the XD and just as reliable. If you are worried, take it to a REPUTABLE smith and have him check it out. Even with the hammer falling when the safety is flicked off, the half cock should catch the hammer.

I CCW a compact 1911 50/50 with a J-frame the other 50%
 

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Zeriab, that was me that replied to your other post. The gun that was having the problem is a series 80 pistol, and it did NOT fire when the hammer fell. What I was trying to convey was that it didn't fire BECAUSE it was a series 80. I'm not trying to say that a series 70 gun is inherently dangerous- it's not- It's just that IF the hammer falls ALL THE WAY DOWN for any reason (including sear failure/misalignment) on a series 70 pistol, it will fire. The half-cock may catch it, it may not. It depends on the condition of the firearm. A properly adjusted series 70 in good shape that is handled properly is not dangerous. For ME, I am more comfortable with the addition of the firing pin block on the series 80 design when dealing with a carry gun. It works off the trigger- if there is a sear failure or a hard drop and the hammer falls, it won't fire because the firing pin is blocked until the trigger is pulled. I don't want you to avoid a gun you really like because of MY opinion. Good luck on your choice!

Jim
 

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People have been carrying "Series 70" 1911 pattern pistols since... oh... well... about 1911.

If in working condition they are safe to carry cocked and locked (Condition One).

With the hammer cocked, the thumb safety on and the grip safety disengaged the engagement surface of the sear is nestled in the hammer hooks. This holds the hammer back. The thumb safety is blocking the sear movement by holding the bottom of the sear forward, therefore holding the top of the sear rearward (and into the hammer hooks). The grip safety shelf is sitting directly behind the trigger bow.

When you ready the pistol into condition zero (live round in tube, hammer cocked, thumb safety disengaged and grip safety engaged) the "button" on the thumb safety sweeps down, below the sear. The shelf on the grip safety swings up above the trigger bow and the sear awaits the push from the trigger bow to slide from under the hammer hooks.

The series 70 has no firing pin block.

The series 80 has firing pin block that is actuated by the trigger.

The Swartz safety has a firing pin block that is actuated by the grip safety..

None of these are unsafe if the pistol in question is in good working order and it maintained. Keep it clean and free of excessive wear and it will not give you a problem.

If you are weary about carrying the pistol in question, try this out.

Ensure the firearm is empty. Now, cock the hammer and flip the thumb safety on. Now carry it around all day in your holster. In the evening when you get home pick it up.

Next day, flip off the thumb safety and ensure that the pistol is unloaded. Now flip on the thumb safety and leave the hammer cocked. Carry it around again all day. Once you carry it around for a little while you will realize that it will not fire unless you deliberately push in the grip safety, flip off the thumb safety and pull the trigger.

That's basically all you can do.

Either that or carry a DA.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Zeriab, that was me that replied to your other post. The gun that was having the problem is a series 80 pistol, and it did NOT fire when the hammer fell. What I was trying to convey was that it didn't fire BECAUSE it was a series 80. I'm not trying to say that a series 70 gun is inherently dangerous- it's not- It's just that IF the hammer falls ALL THE WAY DOWN for any reason (including sear failure/misalignment) on a series 70 pistol, it will fire. The half-cock may catch it, it may not. It depends on the condition of the firearm. A properly adjusted series 70 in good shape that is handled properly is not dangerous. For ME, I am more comfortable with the addition of the firing pin block on the series 80 design when dealing with a carry gun. It works off the trigger- if there is a sear failure or a hard drop and the hammer falls, it won't fire because the firing pin is blocked until the trigger is pulled. I don't want you to avoid a gun you really like because of MY opinion. Good luck on your choice!

Jim

Thanks. I was just looking for more opinions. I didn't list you as the person that responded because some people feel they are being called out on the carpet when their names are listed. I do appreciate your input I just wanted to hear what others had to say about it.

I played with it for quite some time trying to get the hammer to fall. The half cock always caught it if I racked it but didn't set the hammer all of the way back. I will probably do just as Ske1etor suggested. I might just pick up an xd45 compact though too... It will probably just come down to figuring out which one I feel the most comfortable with.
 

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I have several Ser 70 Colt's, and Springfield weapons are Ser 70. I also have a new Colt ser 70 repro I use for ccw. If it fired when disengaging the safety then it seems either the guns been fired enough to do damage to the seer, or it was worked on by a gunsmith who might have done something unintentional with the seer. I once sent in a Ser 70 blue govt model and when I took it to the range, loaded it, and pulled the trigger, it went full auto on me. LOL
 

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I've been carrying my Kimber since I find it more comfortable than carrying the XD40sc. I've removed the magwell, and I load a magazine without a bumper which decreases the size of the grip by 1/2-inch.

I carry it in condition-1, with a Crossbreed Supertuck. It conceals nicely, and is quite comfortable. I've never had a problem with the safety....


Walker
 

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Im not sure what series the RIA GI's copy but I carried it everywhere tossed it around shot 5000 rnds through it and never had the problem of it firing when it wasnt supposed to. just have a gunsmith take a look at it to make sure the parts are not worn out or anything this shouldnt cost that much at all to just look at it
 

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The RIA is based on the original or series 70 design.

I have carried my Combat Commander for years with no fear
of it going off unless I want it to.

The problem the OP describes could be caused by several things
The common ones being worn out or greatly reduced(bent) sear spring.
Or a target only or bad trigger ground down or off half cock notch.

Like others have said, if the trigger group is in proper shape you
should never have a problem with it.
 
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