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Funny thing about people is that they get hung up on things that probably don't matter. Here is a nice interview with Rob Leatham in which he basically states in a nut shell that the trigger reset isn't as important as internet commandos would have you believe. Who would have thought.

 

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Rob shoots/ practices to earn a living, nothing against the man. I shoot, carry and practice to save either my life or the life of others. I will continue to practice fighting from trigger reset, especially in my doa, tda guns. ymmv.
 

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I agree with Rob, no matter what I'm doing, practice with my SD gun or shooting steel the last thing in my mind is trigger reset. I'm focusing on sights, target, and trigger pull. My grip is pretty much second nature.

Align the sights
Pull the trigger straight back
Track the sights
when they are back in alignment
pull the trigger again

A good solid thumbs forward grip make my sights track up and down instead of up and sideways so I get back on target sooner.
 

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Rob shoots/ practices to earn a living, nothing against the man. I shoot, carry and practice to save either my life or the life of others. I will continue to practice fighting from trigger reset, especially in my doa, tda guns. ymmv.
I guess my mileage does vary, I am not sure I see how shooting from reset is more or less appropriate when shooting for personal defense. I think he was saying that when you are shooting fast, which in most self defense scenarios you will be trying to get your shot off as fast and accurately as possible, you will not even feel the click of the reset so learn smooth trigger pull instead of focusing on the specific feel of reset.

At least that is how I took his comment and how I shoot.
 

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IMO he's right about trigger reset, when I'm shooting rapidly I don't ever notice the trigger resetting. Part of the is probably due to my spending about 2/3 of my time shooting revolvers, you learn pretty quickly with a wheelgun that it's best to bounce your finger off the trigger during recoil. I do the same thing with my semi's and I have yet to short stroke the trigger. Back when I could afford to shoot twice a week I was edging my split times down to 2/10 second, now that I can't afford to burn this much ammo I'm running between 4 and 5/10 splits. While that aint great, it'll do for Defense as long as you're scoring hits with each shot.

He's also correct about the aiming process. Years ago I recieved a bit of training from a Police Instructor and he gave me the best advice I've ever recieved. That is to NOT watch the sights, watch your target point and as soon as the sights come into a line between your eye and that target point, pull the trigger. In just 15 minutes I cut my split times by 40%, since then I've shaved it even more.

PS; my idol is Jerry Miculek. Eight rounds per second on a playing card at 5 yards with a revolver, now that's shooting.
 

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If you have committed your reset to muscle memory then yeah I guess it doesn't matter but in effect you are resetting the trigger properly because of it, correct?

I don't concentrate on reset, because I have it committed to muscle memory.

I think Rob is simplifying what he is doing but omitting that he is unconsciously going just to reset.

I think it is important to learn this. As a matter of fact I think it is essential.
 

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Actually from what I've read, they, including Rob say they release the trigger fully. They don't quite slap the trigger but they do release the trigger all the way until they have their finger off the trigger.
 

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Actually from what I've read, they, including Rob say they release the trigger fully. They don't quite slap the trigger but they do release the trigger all the way until they have their finger off the trigger.
When I shot my DAK Sigs I did that very thing.
I rarely used the 1st reset and usually let the trigger go all the forward when shooting.
I knew if I was shooting under stress, that 1st reset would be the last thing on my mind...:D
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ok, now that we have a few opinions I have a query. After watching Rob's interview, why do a large number of gun enthusiasts put so much weight into trigger reset? A perfect example is the Glock and M&P. The M&P is constantly criticized for it's vague reset and the Glock is praised for its "strong" reset. If it really doesn't matter, why is such a big deal made about it? Is it a result of so many internet-commandos praising one thing or another until it becomes a commonly considered positive, deserving or not?
 

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Actually from what I've read, they, including Rob say they release the trigger fully. They don't quite slap the trigger but they do release the trigger all the way until they have their finger off the trigger.
I've seen video of my shooting when I shoot really fast like a double tap. My finger is completely off the trigger between shots.

I'm pretty sure that Rob was right about 90% of shooters do that.
 

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I'm with Rob in that I don't worry about trigger reset and completely move the trigger/finger forward between shots. My reason is that I carry based on attire which means I could be carrying my DA/SA CZ, XD9SC, revolver, etc., just depends on what I'm wearing and where I'm going. A full motion forward of the trigger works on all the weapons without knowing where they reset.

I actually attended a competition where the RO told me to look for the reset and only release that far. I said Okay, but didn't change and did just fine.
 

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Ok, now that we have a few opinions I have a query. After watching Rob's interview, why do a large number of gun enthusiasts put so much weight into trigger reset? A perfect example is the Glock and M&P. The M&P is constantly criticized for it's vague reset and the Glock is praised for its "strong" reset. If it really doesn't matter, why is such a big deal made about it? Is it a result of so many internet-commandos praising one thing or another until it becomes a commonly considered positive, deserving or not?
I put a RAM in the M&P's with the DCAEK. There is nothing vage about it now. Its completely predictable as is the break.
 

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Ok, now that we have a few opinions I have a query. After watching Rob's interview, why do a large number of gun enthusiasts put so much weight into trigger reset? A perfect example is the Glock and M&P. The M&P is constantly criticized for it's vague reset and the Glock is praised for its "strong" reset. If it really doesn't matter, why is such a big deal made about it? Is it a result of so many internet-commandos praising one thing or another until it becomes a commonly considered positive, deserving or not?

Actually he did say that MOST people cant. Not everyone. I know that I dont release the trigger fully and churn out decent times for someone who has only been doing IDPA since November of 2010. I didnt get serious until February of this year.

The key from all the instructors I have watched or taken lessons from is that you have to watch all those little things that ultimately add up to take the seconds away from your time. Transitions seem to be the biggest. Master class shooters handle transitions better and much faster than most others.

If you are shooting competitively and still jerking the trigger you need instruction and a ton of practice.

My trigger pull is all on muscle memory. You can tell because if the gun goes into slide lock and you look at where you finger is, its not fully released. I pull my finger off the trigger when I am moving, reloading or finished. Otherwise I have my targets acquired and am moving quickly to put rounds down range.
 

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Grandmaster shooters, the ones that have discussed this, don't jerk the trigger but they do remove total tension from the trigger, even to the point of removing their finger from the trigger, during each pull, they don't try to feel the reset.
 

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I know that when I'm shooting Steel, I get going to fast and find myself jerking the trigger. When I feel and see (missing plates) that I'm doing that, I will slow down and relax my finger a bit and that helps.

As far as the sight picture, I use a C-More so that when the dot's on the plate gun goes bang.
 
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