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Hey guys not sure if this is where to post this. I have been thinking about reloading. Please feel free to move this post to the correct area. I would like to reload, 30-06, 5.56, 38 special, 40 S&W, and of course 45 Auto.

Please list all the things I would need to start reloading the above Cals. Please be specific.
 

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Here is a great resource for learning about reloading.

Ultimate Reloader

This guy does instructional videos on a lot of different manufacturer's reloading presses. On his main page on the left hand side there are links to some basic reloading information that is good for people looking for your basic info. Also on the top of the page are tabs for each manufacturer.

I purchased a Hornady LNL AP press 6 months ago and have loaded about 4000 rounds so far. Good luck!

Oh, btw... the key that I found to making reloading very inexpensive is casting your own bullets from wheel weights.
 

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The first die in any die set that you buy will be the die that removes the old primer. There is long stem that essentially punches out the die from the inside out. Look at some of the videos on the link I posted above and it will make better sense.
 

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How do you remove old primers? Thats one of my main wanting to know things.
the resizing/decapping die has a pin that pushes out primer during upstroke of press.

a good start for you would be to buy and read 'ABCs of Reloading'
 

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How do you remove old primers? Thats one of my main wanting to know things.
What you need to do is buy a couple of reloading manuals. Read them, once you've read them, then come back in ask questions you still have. The ABCs of Reloading is a good one.
 

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the resizing/decapping die has a pin that pushes out primer during upstroke of press.

a good start for you would be to buy and read 'ABCs of Reloading'
THis is always my best advice, short of taking a NRA class, ABCs, is a great "reloading for newb's" book. I would have to watch the videos linked, but if the guy knows waht he is doing, sure, but I find having a ready ref source like ABCs very valuable to go back to as you will have many questions once you start.
Cost & need, always relates to speed & volumn. The more ammo you want to make quickly, the more it will cost you. You can get a very good setup for around $300 in a single stage, but it's slow, less than 100rds/hr. The next step up is a turret, a bit more, but your ammo count goes up to 150+/hr. Then a progressive. This is where many newbs get confused. IMO, there are only a few worth considering. Any Dillon, top notch gear. The Hornady LNL, very good, the RCBS too. I would not waste my money buying Lee progressive. If money is tight, buy the Lee Calsssi Cast Turret, a better machine by far than either progressive they make.
Most shooters/reloaders just don't NEED a progressive of any kind. If you shoot a lot of competition or train weekly, then a progressive is very nice as it does save you time. The LNL or Dillon 550B will easily run 450rds+/hr. The Dillon 650, 650rds/hr+. The 1050, crazy, like 1000rds/hr.
 

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How do you remove old primers? Thats one of my main wanting to know things.
Start with this 3 step process:
1) Buy reloading book.
2) Read the reloading book from front to back.
3) Answer your own questions.

The most basic step in reloading is removing the old primer. If you don't know how to do this basic step, you should go to #1 and do #2, to get #3. Everything you ever need to know is contained in the book. 4) Do not buy any reloading tools or equipment before completing #3.
 

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Start with this 3 step process:
1) Buy reloading book.
2) Read the reloading book from front to back.
3) Answer your own questions.

The most basic step in reloading is removing the old primer. If you don't know how to do this basic step, you should go to #1 and do #2, to get #3. Everything you ever need to know is contained in the book. 4) Do not buy any reloading tools or equipment before completing #3.

+1 If you get a good book you will learn alot more than asking questions, there is nothing wrong with asking but a good manual will take you thru all the steps
 

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I would also start with an easy round to reload like the 45. I started with 40 S&W and got into trouble. You need to learn to pay attention to whats going on. Get at least 3 reloading books. I have a Lee, Lyman and Sierra to reference all the different loads. I started with a Lee classic turret press, then made the mistake of going to a Lee Pro 1000. I have a Dillon XL650 now that I got for a really good deal. I think one of the best deals out there for a progressive press is the Hornady Lock-N-Load. They usually have a promo going where you get 500 or 1000 bullets with the press. Like others have said, read, read, read. You really need to understand the process before you start. As for what you need, below is what I would start with.

- Reloading manuals
- Digital scale
- Press
- Dies or caliber conversion kits depending on the press
- Vibratory tumbler for brass cleaning
- Cleaning media(I use crushed walnut shells)
- Media separator(Optional)
 

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I would also start with an easy round to reload like the 45. I started with 40 S&W and got into trouble. You need to learn to pay attention to whats going on. Get at least 3 reloading books. I have a Lee, Lyman and Sierra to reference all the different loads. I started with a Lee classic turret press, then made the mistake of going to a Lee Pro 1000. I have a Dillon XL650 now that I got for a really good deal. I think one of the best deals out there for a progressive press is the Hornady Lock-N-Load. They usually have a promo going where you get 500 or 1000 bullets with the press. Like others have said, read, read, read. You really need to understand the process before you start. As for what you need, below is what I would start with.

- Reloading manuals (Lyman, Speer & Hornady are best IMO)
- Digital scale (there are no good cheap dig scales, $50 Dillon beam)
- Press (this is where you spend your big $$)
- Dies or caliber conversion kits depending on the press (all dies are work on all presses but the Dillon SDB)
- Vibratory tumbler for brass cleaning
- Cleaning media(I use crushed walnut shells)
- Media separator(Optional)
I would add; calipers, dig or dial.
You don't really need a tumbler, it just makes it easier to clean brass, but many like to use wet solutions, no extra equip cost, but the hassle factor goes way up IMO. You have to dry the cases completely before reloading. If I really wanted a progressive & was buying today, it would be the LNL. Best bang for the buck & can be easily upgraded to a case feeder later. Hint though, I would buy the Dillon case feeder & get the upgrade kit form Hornady. The Dillon feeder is just better made, quieter w/ a 2 speed motor.
 

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I would add; calipers, dig or dial.
You don't really need a tumbler, it just makes it easier to clean brass, but many like to use wet solutions, no extra equip cost, but the hassle factor goes way up IMO. You have to dry the cases completely before reloading. If I really wanted a progressive & was buying today, it would be the LNL. Best bang for the buck & can be easily upgraded to a case feeder later. Hint though, I would buy the Dillon case feeder & get the upgrade kit form Hornady. The Dillon feeder is just better made, quieter w/ a 2 speed motor.
Dam, I knew I forgot something. You cant live without the calipers. I use a frankford arsenal digital scale(49.00) and have had no issues. I have a beam scale that I use to check it from time to time. The Lee deluxe 4 hole turret press kit is what I started on and still use for my 308 loads. It comes with everything you need to start press wise for under 200 bucks. I still use lee dies for everything.
 

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Dam, I knew I forgot something. You cant live without the calipers. I use a frankford arsenal digital scale(49.00) and have had no issues. I have a beam scale that I use to check it from time to time. The Lee deluxe 4 hole turret press kit is what I started on and still use for my 308 loads. It comes with everything you need to start press wise for under 200 bucks. I still use lee dies for everything.
I've seen & heard bad things about the FA so won;t recommend it. I have owned some other brands fo cheaper dig scales, same thing, not recommended. Most won't hold zero or reliably/repeatably measure to 0.1gr. So I'll stick by my original statement, there are no good cheap dig scales. Spend the money, get a RCBS, Dillon or the new Hornady. At least if they go bad, the manuf will abck them, I doubt FA or Midway will.
 

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I've seen & heard bad things about the FA so won;t recommend it. I have owned some other brands fo cheaper dig scales, same thing, not recommended. Most won't hold zero or reliably/repeatably measure to 0.1gr. So I'll stick by my original statement, there are no good cheap dig scales. Spend the money, get a RCBS, Dillon or the new Hornady. At least if they go bad, the manuf will abck them, I doubt FA or Midway will.
Thats why most scales have a tare function. Even the expensive ones have that. Look at the description for the RCBS scales, they even say + or - 1/10 of a grain accuracy. Mine also came with a calibration weight to make sure things are within spec. Now if I had the money when I bought mine, I might have looked at a more expensive one, but, It works and is on with my bar scale as well. Its kinda like saying no Lee Pro 1000 press will work. Yet there are plenty of people out there that crank out tons of rounds with them. I was not one of them. Im just saying, dont discount things because they are cheaper. Somethings actually work.:)
 

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I went through the learning process when I decided to start reloading back in February. I am now at 5200 rounds reloaded and have learned quite a bit. Luckily, the members of this forum have always been quite helpful and have helped me avoid some mistakes. Books are great but don't answer everything. If you buy several, you will even notice some contradictory information in them but it is usually [but not always] minor stuff.

Here is the thread I started back then that details all of the equipment I purchased. I'm not saying to buy what I did; however, it will at least give you items to consider when making your decision on what you will need to get started. I went overboard on my purchases and could have gotten started much cheaper but it was right for me.

http://www.xdtalk.com/forums/ammo-can/169233-getting-into-reloading-casting-heres-my-list.html
 

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Thats why most scales have a tare function. Even the expensive ones have that. Look at the description for the RCBS scales, they even say + or - 1/10 of a grain accuracy. Mine also came with a calibration weight to make sure things are within spec. Now if I had the money when I bought mine, I might have looked at a more expensive one, but, It works and is on with my bar scale as well. Its kinda like saying no Lee Pro 1000 press will work. Yet there are plenty of people out there that crank out tons of rounds with them. I was not one of them. Im just saying, dont discount things because they are cheaper. Somethings actually work.:)
The tare function should only be needed once after you turn it on when you place the pan on it. It's NOT there to rezero every time you place the pan on it. That was my exp w/ the cheap FA, it wouldn't hold zero. If it won't hold zero & you have to tare it everytime, then you can't rely on the accuracy of the scale either. JMO, if you want a cheap scale, get a Dillon beam, $50. If you want a dig scale, spend the money & get the RCBS, Dillon or new Hornady.
I hate cheap tools that barely do the job. When I set upon a task, I want to focus on the task, not the tool. It's why I shy away frpm cheap Lee reloading gear as well.
 

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The tare function should only be needed once after you turn it on when you place the pan on it. It's NOT there to rezero every time you place the pan on it. That was my exp w/ the cheap FA, it wouldn't hold zero. If it won't hold zero & you have to tare it everytime, then you can't rely on the accuracy of the scale either. JMO, if you want a cheap scale, get a Dillon beam, $50. If you want a dig scale, spend the money & get the RCBS, Dillon or new Hornady.
I hate cheap tools that barely do the job. When I set upon a task, I want to focus on the task, not the tool. It's why I shy away frpm cheap Lee reloading gear as well.
Well just saying, I have loaded thousands of rounds and used the scale quite a bit and never had an issue. I dont use the tare function every single time either. I have read a lot of good reviews about this scale and it works for me. A lot of people use lee dies because they work. I have lee, dillon and lyman dies and find it easier to use lee dies. I respect your choice on spending the extra money and if I had doubts about this scale or anything else, I would get the upgrade, but, till now havent had a reason to. Hell even my Dillon XL650 has given me fits and its supposed to be one of the best presses on the market.
 

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yeah read the books then come back and post up your questions, oh also check out the presses from lee, rcbs, and dillon and then form your questions
 

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One thing I've learned about beginning reloading, is pick a good, all-around powder at first. I know 2 people that started with a "hot" powder and got into trouble. One guy wanted to load .357 to something like 1900fps (I forget the number he was shooting for, no pun intended).

Pick something from the lower or middle of the chart, and deal with the hotter stuff later.
 
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