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Discussion Starter #1
Everybody recomends that I "slingshot" the slide instead of using the slide release.
When I am practicing rapid fire through my mags I have a problem.
When the slide is locked back I drop the spent mag and slam in the new mag. But only with a full mag and some force this will cause the slide to release on its own and go into battery. Not knowing this because I am trying to go as fast as I can I instinctively rack the slide to release it only to watch good ammo go spinning over my head.
What do I do?
1. Just start using the slide release like everyone tells me not to.
2. Just start trusting that everytime I slap in a new mag the slide will release and chamber a round.
3. Don't change a thing always "slingshot" the slide to go into battery even if it means wasting ammo.
 

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Why are they telling you not to use the slide lock/release? That's what it's for. I've shot and taught shooting semi auto pistols since 1977, and that's what the release is for, to release the slide. In actual shooting, when someone is shooting at you, it's much easier to get in the habit of using the slide release than it is to use the support hand to pull back the slide. It's faster, and if the support hand is injured, and you can't use it to pull back the slide, it's just that much more confusing under stress.

I keep hearing a lot of gun range commandos espousing a lot of theories, but most of them have never been closer to a real gunfight than their TV set. I've been there and done that, and I can tell you that everything changes when you're ducking incoming rounds while trying to protect your butt and put the other guy out of commission.

My advice is to use the slide release and ignore "helpful advice" from amateurs. And if all else fails, read the instruction manual that came with your XD, and it clearly instructs you to use the slide release after inserting the magazine. If the manufacturer tells you to do it that way, then it can't be all wrong, can it?

Hope this helps.

Fred
 

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I dont remember where but I remember reading that using the release is better than racking the slide anyway. I had the bad habit of doing the same thing. Had to work on it at the range for a while but after a bunch of reload drills releasing the slide with the slide release, its the way I do it now.

Im no expert on why one or the other is better but there are plenty of reasons to just use the release and I havent heard one not to yet....
 

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When I am practicing rapid fire through my mags I have a problem.
Slide goes forward = back on target faster.
Manual rack = slower back to target.
While competing I thank the Plastic Gun Gods every time my slide goes forward on it's own, if it doesn't I act accordingly. I can only hope that reacting to less than perfect gun actions will be as calculated in a gun fight. :roll:
Odds are that if your having to change mags in a gunfight speed will not be what you need, a headshot is. :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The reasoning they have given to slingshoting the slide is to,
1. It gives the slide a little more length and there by a little more force to chamber off a round helps to prevent FTFeed.
2. Keep your firing hand in the correct position for aiming and pulling the trigger.

I'm gonna look into it some more
Thanks
 

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ReloaderFred said:
Why are they telling you not to use the slide lock/release? That's what it's for. I've shot and taught shooting semi auto pistols since 1977, and that's what the release is for, to release the slide. In actual shooting, when someone is shooting at you, it's much easier to get in the habit of using the slide release than it is to use the support hand to pull back the slide. It's faster, and if the support hand is injured, and you can't use it to pull back the slide, it's just that much more confusing under stress.

I keep hearing a lot of gun range commandos espousing a lot of theories, but most of them have never been closer to a real gunfight than their TV set. I've been there and done that, and I can tell you that everything changes when you're ducking incoming rounds while trying to protect your butt and put the other guy out of commission.

My advice is to use the slide release and ignore "helpful advice" from amateurs. And if all else fails, read the instruction manual that came with your XD, and it clearly instructs you to use the slide release after inserting the magazine. If the manufacturer tells you to do it that way, then it can't be all wrong, can it?

Hope this helps.

Fred
I agree. The theory about using a slingshot release is that if you are under stress you are better at doing gross muscle memory movements like shucking on the slide and all this slapping and tapping rather than fine movements like thumbing down the release. I guess there is some merit to that, but I really don't think it matters if you've practiced it either way. I like the slide release because it gets me on target quicker and there's less chance of me shooting my fingers off. :lol:
 

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XD_Dan said:
Fingolfin said:
...and there's less chance of me shooting my fingers off.
Just how do you rack your slide? :shock:
My guess is a forward-set press check.

AKA the slip-and-remove-a-finger method.
 

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Soysuperhombre said:
The reasoning they have given to slingshoting the slide is to,
1. It gives the slide a little more length and there by a little more force to chamber off a round helps to prevent FTFeed.
2. Keep your firing hand in the correct position for aiming and pulling the trigger.

I'm gonna look into it some more
Thanks
Back in 1967 the U.S. Army taught me to use the slide release, slingshot wasn't even discussed. I've been doing it that way ever since. I can see no reason to change at this late date.

Now let's look at #1 you're only gaining 1/4" or so of slide travel just how much additional spring force will that provide?

Now, #2 you've already disturbed your grip by doing a reload you still have to reestablish your firing grip.

Another argument for using the slingshot method is; "You'll wear the slide release out." The part is replaceable for Pete's sake!
 

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Soysuperhombre said:
1. Just start using the slide release like everyone tells me not to.
2. Just start trusting that everytime I slap in a new mag the slide will release and chamber a round.
3. Don't change a thing always "slingshot" the slide to go into battery even if it means wasting ammo.
the guy that i train with told me this....

"every instructor has thier own way of doing something, that doesnt mean it will work for you."


the reason they say not to use the slide lock release is because its "unreliable". meaning, under stress you may think you have pressed it hard enough, or your finger may have sliped off of the release.....all of this causes you time. its whats known as a "high speed, low drag" technique.

if you are not worried about being super fast, then dont worry about it.


this is what i do...

when doing a fast slidelock reload, and the slide doesnt release when i slam the mag in, i come over the top of the slide and rack it.
why?
reason #1. it works just like "slingshoting"
reason #2. i dont alter my grip
reason #3. its easy
reason #4. MOST IMPORTANT - when doing malfunction clearences you rack the slide the same way. TAP and RACK (over the top of the slide, useing your whole hand) for malfunction clearence, not TAP and SLINGSHOT (at least i have never seen this done). so in essence, everytime my slide doesnt automatically release(during a reload), i practice a step of malfunction clearing by racking the slide, instead of slingshoting.




you just have to find what works best for you...
 

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I have always used the slide release on my XD as well as my 1911s and Hi-Power. Very rarely do I slingshot the slide...theres more room for error in that.

My Dad, a retired USMC MP, showed me a quick way to draw from a flap holster and rack the slide on the way up. He has done this for years and it is a strong argument for him not carrying a round in the chamber of his 1911. Dad grasps the top of the slide with all four fingers, not just the serrated area on the back and racks it on the way up, then uses his left hand for a two-handed grip. Its amazingly fast - one swift movement. Less chance of letting go of the slide early, if you have all four fingers on the slide, instead of just using the forefinger and thumb on the serrated part of the slide.

Sometimes, these older guys that carried autopistols most of their lives have something to teach us that is not in any video or tactical playbook..and it works. Dad carried a M1911A1 for the better part of 16 years as an MP in the Corps.

-Brickboy240
 

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Well i understand the argument for those who use the slide lock lever.... but i would go the other way and rack the slide. Thats the way i was tought by my instructor, a pd sgt(not that it matters).


Reasons why....
1) For those with small hands, strong hand may need to pivot around grip to hit slide lock lever, thus releasing shooting grip.
2) Fine motor function v Gross motor function
3) Potential for wear on lever and stop notch from excessive release with lever.
4) Consistency with clearing malfunctions and charging makes for easier training of muscle memory.


jus my 2cents
 

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The slide stop lever release method is faster, but there is the gross vs. fine motor skill issue. I don't know how much merit there is to that, but when I teach, I teach the over-the-slide rack method rather than the slide lock lever method.

Reasoning behind that is that during a stovepipe clearance, you'll want your hand up over the ejection port to help sweep the stuck shell while racking. Thus racking this way on a reload and racking this way for a tap-rack-bang drill means one method to remember, not two. Also, with the over-the-top racking method, the firing hand needs to move less than a true "slingshot".

Is one right and one wrong? Probably not. That's what makes sens to and works best for me, therefore I teach it to my students, but I also encourage them to find what works best for THEM and to practice that.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
therooster said:
reason #4. MOST IMPORTANT - when doing malfunction clearences you rack the slide the same way. TAP and RACK (over the top of the slide, useing your whole hand) for malfunction clearence, not TAP and SLINGSHOT (at least i have never seen this done). so in essence, everytime my slide doesnt automatically release(during a reload), i practice a step of malfunction clearing by racking the slide, instead of slingshoting.

quote]I'm gonna doing this but it will be a while before I can get out to the range and practice. Thanks for the advice.
 

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Any top firearm school, Thunder Ranch or Gunsite will teach you to use the slide lock release. That's why your gun came with one, use it. You won't wear it out prematurely, if it does break, replace it. 20$ on a 1911.

Using the release buttons uses all of the potential energy in your slide spring. Manhandling the slide actually generates less force. Your slide is forced forward after releasing the button, and the round is forced under the extractor and then chambered. This is a quick event, happening is less than .10 sec. Using youhand to do it is mmmmmmuuuuuucccccchhhh slower....

You also get back to the target in at least 1 sec faster with a slide-lock reload. Important in competition and in self defense.
 

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Soysuperhombre said:
therooster said:
reason #4. MOST IMPORTANT - when doing malfunction clearences you rack the slide the same way. TAP and RACK (over the top of the slide, useing your whole hand) for malfunction clearence, not TAP and SLINGSHOT (at least i have never seen this done). so in essence, everytime my slide doesnt automatically release(during a reload), i practice a step of malfunction clearing by racking the slide, instead of slingshoting.
I'm gonna doing this but it will be a while before I can get out to the range and practice. Thanks for the advice.
the bottom line is... regardless of what i say, or he says, or "the top gun shcools" say. try every method, and see what works best for you, because everyone is different.
 

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How much success have you XD owners had with slamming the magazine. At our recent Houston XD shoot, therooster showed us this and not everyone was able to pull it off.

What are the mechanics behind thise manuever? Is the slidelock jarring out from the energy transfer from mag to frame? Is there a better position to hold the gun in for this to work(straight up, sideways, angle)? Do you slam with the gun and the mag or just the mag?

This technique was completely new to me. My gun seemed to like it. Im not too comfortable practicing it at home to get a good idea of how to pull it off consistently.
 
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