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Any words of wisdom on how I can reduce the felt recoil on my 40? I heard about replacing the spring. I am also concerned about my warranty. Please advice
 

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I would NOT go to a weaker spring, you'll just beat up the gun.

However, there is one way to help a bit. That is to apply basic Physics, as in the equation that Force=Mass x Acceleration. If Force is held constant in this equation it means that as mass is Increased, Acceleration is Reduced. What does this mean? It means you should use the heaviest bullet you can find. It will help turn that Snap into a push more like the 45ACP. It won't completely remove the snap but it will help.

Then there is another application of F=M x A. That is to increase the weight of the pistol. Slide a heavier pistol in that equation and you get another reduction in Acceleration. So, add a solid guide rod to the pistol, tungsten carbide if you can afford it. This will not only add some weight to the pistol, it will place that increase in mass in a location that will aid in reducing muzzle flip.

Finally, a third application of good old F=M x A. That is to increase the System Mass of the platform that is holding your pistol. Shotgun shooters learn this lesson very quickly. You only forget to hold a 12 gage hard to your sholder just once, the inrestrained recoil of a 12 gage will really make if a memorable event because it hurts like hell. In the case of a handgun this is accomplished by keeping your wrists and elbows locked. This add the mass of your arm(s) to the System Mass and will greatly reduce the percieved recoil. If you let you wrist(s) flip, the system mass is reduced to that of your hand(s) and gun only and it will hurt more. Another benefit is that it will allow a much higher degree of recoil control and permit a much more rapid followup.

A long long time ago in a galaxy far far away, I learned a very good exercise for building wrist strength. Take a sawed off broom handle, drill a 1/4 inch hole thru the middle and tie a clothesline to the handle. Then tie a 5, or 10 lbs. weight to the other end. To exercise wind that line around that broom handle with a hand on each end to lift you weight. Use both overhand and under hand grips to achieve a variety and balance the muscle development. While the weight may seem light, you'll be surprized at how quickly it will start burning. One final tip, if you have tunnel carpal, or suspect you may have it, consult a Doctor before engaging in this exercise because it may be totally unsafe for anyone with this condition.

BTW, I do have mild tunnel carpal syndrome and know how badly it can hurt. There have been times when the simply act of turning the key to start my car has left my right hand nearly crippled for at least a week. Thus my warning. Frankly, I haven't had any need to do that exercise in over 30 years, I just remember how much it would burn when I was wrestling. Since then 30 years of working as a mechanic, then a machinist has left me with wrist and hand strength that many have found surprizing. Unfortunatley, 20 years of doing computer design has created an issue with tunnel carpal, however I can still run a mill with the best of them if I haven't tweaked my wrist.

So, I have some mild Tunnel Carpal and still shoot a 40. Hey, I shoot it well and have yet to Tweak my wrist while shooting. However, I have found that shooting more than 150 rounds in an hour will leave me a bit "twingy" the next day. Basically, it feels like I am being warned to be VERY VERY careful about wrist position when starting the car or anything that requires rotation and force.

So, what the point. Point is that the 40 is a caliber that is not that evil to shoot. Frankly, I really didn't notice much difference when I moved from 9mm to the 40 caliber. As for why I didn't notice much difference, it's because I was shooting with my wrists and elbows locked as solid as possible. Quite simply I was maximizing the System Mass to a level that made the difference in power not very noticable. I also think that is what allows me to shoot a handgun without pain even though I do have some Tunnel Carpal. Basically, if you keep your wrist(s) locked in the correct position, you won't aggravate an existing injury.

Anyhow, I hope this helps. One thing that I would suggest is that you pay attention to what happens during recoil. Is the pistol flipping in your hands? If so, experiment with your grip. Are you allowing your wrist(s) to twist? If so, firm it up. Are you allowing your elbow(s) to hinge? If so, keep them locked. Basically, pay atention to what you are doing and think about it's effect on System Mass and you soon learn that the 40 really isn't that bad to shoot.

PS, if you want a snappy round, try a 9mm +P 115 gr. HP. These deliver a bit more energy than a standard 40 with a bullet mass of around 2/3 of a heavy 40. Quite simply they can sting just a bit and will hurt if you don't utilize System Mass.
 

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Scooter,
What a great reply.Fantastic information.I never asked the question,but I will sure put your advice to use.

Thanks,
HntnFsh
 

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Sheesh . . . I was considering something kind of flippant, maybe "replace it with an XD9" . . . but scooter took all the fun out of the thread by providing detailed, helpful information. :mad:

Kidding . . . great reply, scooter!
 

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I would NOT go to a weaker spring, you'll just beat up the gun.
I'm sure he was talking about a STRONGER spring, as a weaker spring would INCREASE felt recoil.

A stronger spring such as the Wolff extra power springs would help reduce felt recoil, and can sometimes make quite a difference. I use one in my Kahr P9 with great results. However, if this gun is to be used for SD, than you MUST verify that the spring weight is reliable with your chosen load, so practice quite a bit. You can also try one of the various reduced recoil loads available, they may just do the trick using your stock spring.
As far as the warranty, I can not see how using an extra power spring would affect it. Just my .02
 

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Scooter, that is a fine explanation. The thoroughness you used helps to make it reasonably easy to understand, even for folks that may not be learned in physics or fitness. Your simple exercise suggestion of using the broom stick, clothesline, and weight, is so practical and easy to arrange.

I have been educated in science and fitness training, as well as have practiced both for many, many years, and concur with your suggestions. You have judiciously used cautions in your explanation which, to me, adds credibility to what you say.

Very nicely done. Thanks.


LS
 

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Yes, get a 9mm :lol:
 

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Remember to grip the pistol high and use a firm grip. I shoot a lot of rifle from a bipod and I'm used to being really relaxed and keeping a loose grip with my trigger hand. That doesn't works so well for the pistol.
 

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I would'a just added that you try an aftermarket guide rod and a slightly heavier spring. :shrug:
 

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If you don't already, try using some Pearce grip extensions with what other members have suggested. I know the PGE helped me a lot.
 

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I would tell you how I solved mine, but based on a previous poster, it falls under "flippant".
 
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