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Recrowning, from what I know, is something you do with older guns that have lost some accuracy. By recrowning, you are putting the dimension back into spec. Perhaps someone can add to this.

In the end, why would a new XD need to be recrowned?
 

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I believe it's something like a reverse mill on the end of the barrel. Of course that's probably completely wrong. I'm sure it's done to help protect the rifling at the end of the barrel. If you've ever seen the business end of a target barrel that's what it is---I think. It seems to me that there is not really enough material on the end of the barrel to even do it.
 

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Crowning is simply cutting an even surface on the muzzle perpendicular to the bore and concentric to the bore... basically just facing off the muzzle with a lathe.

This is done to provide a consistent exit surface for the gasses as they exit the bore directly behind the bullet. If there is a nick in the crown, more gas will escape here, altering the thrust on the bullet and thus making it go in an undesired direction.

The other purpose of crowning is often to cut a recess at the muzzle to protect the actual exit area of the bore. This is why you see recessed crowns on target rifles.

95% of modern, high quality firearms such as the XD come out of the box with the crown cut correctly. Others may not be done so well, for instance my FEG High Power had an obviously assymetrical crown. Older guns which suffer damage to the muzzle may need to be recrowned.
 

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ken_mays said:
Crowning is simply cutting an even surface on the muzzle perpendicular to the bore and concentric to the bore... basically just facing off the muzzle with a lathe.
That's an oversimplification. There are numerous different crown angles, all with their various proponents touting the benefits of one over another. That said, you got the rest spot on. :)
 

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ken_mays said:
Crowning is simply cutting an even surface on the muzzle perpendicular to the bore and concentric to the bore... basically just facing off the muzzle with a lathe.

This is done to provide a consistent exit surface for the gasses as they exit the bore directly behind the bullet. If there is a nick in the crown, more gas will escape here, altering the thrust on the bullet and thus making it go in an undesired direction.

The other purpose of crowning is often to cut a recess at the muzzle to protect the actual exit area of the bore. This is why you see recessed crowns on target rifles.

95% of modern, high quality firearms such as the XD come out of the box with the crown cut correctly. Others may not be done so well, for instance my FEG High Power had an obviously assymetrical crown. Older guns which suffer damage to the muzzle may need to be recrowned.
Yup, what he said :wink:
 

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ken_mays said:
Crowning is simply cutting an even surface on the muzzle perpendicular to the bore and concentric to the bore... basically just facing off the muzzle with a lathe.

This is done to provide a consistent exit surface for the gasses as they exit the bore directly behind the bullet. If there is a nick in the crown, more gas will escape here, altering the thrust on the bullet and thus making it go in an undesired direction.

The other purpose of crowning is often to cut a recess at the muzzle to protect the actual exit area of the bore. This is why you see recessed crowns on target rifles.

95% of modern, high quality firearms such as the XD come out of the box with the crown cut correctly. Others may not be done so well, for instance my FEG High Power had an obviously assymetrical crown. Older guns which suffer damage to the muzzle may need to be recrowned.
:) +1
 

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moeman said:
ken_mays said:
Crowning is simply cutting an even surface on the muzzle perpendicular to the bore and concentric to the bore... basically just facing off the muzzle with a lathe.

This is done to provide a consistent exit surface for the gasses as they exit the bore directly behind the bullet. If there is a nick in the crown, more gas will escape here, altering the thrust on the bullet and thus making it go in an undesired direction.

The other purpose of crowning is often to cut a recess at the muzzle to protect the actual exit area of the bore. This is why you see recessed crowns on target rifles.

95% of modern, high quality firearms such as the XD come out of the box with the crown cut correctly. Others may not be done so well, for instance my FEG High Power had an obviously assymetrical crown. Older guns which suffer damage to the muzzle may need to be recrowned.
:) +1
:) +2
 
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