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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have read where the XDM 5.25 in 45 actually recoils less than the same gun in 9mm. The article I read said the 45 tends to "push" back in the hand as opposed to the 9mm being more "snappy" and is harder to control. I have not fired either in the 5.25 platform. Anyone shoot both that can compare?
 

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I haven't shot the 5.25 in either caliber, but in buying my first handgun recently I went through the process of renting and shooting as many different guns / calibers available at my LGS as my wallet would allow to find what I liked. IMO, felt recoil comparisons are pretty subtle, and largely depend on what a person is used to - I did feel like .45 tended to be move of a push than a snap, but I think a large part of that is because I had read about it beforehand. If I had just gone out and shot both without reading anything, I'm not sure I would have made that distinction. I ended up going with an XDM .40 Compact; the main complaint about .40 is the "snappy" recoil, but I very much enjoy shooting it.

The point is, it's really hard (and probably inadvisable) to rely on what you read about things like felt recoil, ergonomics, etc. I'm not saying there's no truth to the general consensus, but rather that 90% of it depends on the shooter.
 

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Recoil is subjective, but whenever posted what you read might be retarded. The 9mm recoils quite a bit less than the .40 or .45 in the same platform and is easier than any of the three to get follow up shots off. While it is my opinion that the .45 is more of a firm push than a snap, it still recoils with markedly more force than does the 9mm. That's just a fact.
 

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Maybe the article you read compared .40 S&W to .45 ACP. When comparing those two rounds, 40 S&W feels more snappy to me, versus .45 ACP which feels more like a push.

9mm definitely has less recoil than either 40 S&W or .45 ACP. I have both pistols you mentioned and there's no comparison between the recoil of 9mm and the recoil of .45 ACP.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I cant seem to find the article, but I also remember something about the 45 weighing a bit more, maybe that plays a factor in it.
 

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to simplify things...recoil and muzzle flip are two entirely different phenomenon...

Recoil is as subjective as they come--your grip, hand size, physical build, type of ammunition, barrel length and posture all affect the felt-recoil of any round...now common sense will dictate that a .454 Casull is going to recoil more than a .223...but the felt recoil differs from person to person...

Muzzle Flip is most common amongst .40 caliber handguns but has been experienced in 9mm platforms as well, particularly when +P or +P+ ammunition is used in a 4" or smaller barrel...its much less subjective than felt recoil, but still has a margin of difference based upon the shooter and the type of ammo...

Experience tells me that the .45 will likely not experience muzzle flip but has the potential for slightly more felt-recoil (depending upon the shooter) whereas the 9mm would much more likely experience a combination of both...

If I hto choose, I would go with a .45 over a 9mm just because I have always loved the round and its capability--you really can't go wrong either way but until you handle one and fire it, you probably won't have a direct answer of which fits best
 

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Having a 9 and 45 xdm 3.8 I can say the 9 has much less recoil, not that the 45 is hard to control by any means. I can shoot nearly identical with them but with the 9 I can put a little less focus on between shots as it doesn't move my hands as much. That being said and as others have stated recoil is rather subjective and ymmv.
 

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Recoil itself can be objectively measured, as can be "muzzle flip," which is but the physical manifestation of recoil in the hand(s) of a shooter.

Recoil feel, however, is completely subjective, and how that "muzzle flip" is controlled - or not - is also subjective and completely up to the individual and unique shooter.

The only way you will know for sure what it's going to feel like for you is to get out there and actually shoot those guns, with the loads/cartridges/rounds you intend to use. :)
 

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Recoil itself can be objectively measured, as can be "muzzle flip," which is but the physical manifestation of recoil in the hand(s) of a shooter.

Recoil feel, however, is completely subjective, and how that "muzzle flip" is controlled - or not - is also subjective and completely up to the individual and unique shooter.

The only way you will know for sure what it's going to feel like for you is to get out there and actually shoot those guns, with the loads/cartridges/rounds you intend to use. :)

yep
 

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Ah, and I forgot to link this older thread:

http://www.xdtalk.com/forums/classroom/257328-physics-muzzle-flip.html :)

Good recoil control via a dominant grip (technique and/or strength) - as well as a good match (again, subjective) of the gun with the shooter's hand - can significantly alter one's subjective experience of "recoil/muzzle-flip."

My 8 year-old daughter can successfully handle the recoil of the typical 115 gr. 9mm range-fodder (no, not live-fire: I have no intention of souring her on the shooting sports - rather, it's easy to simulate by forcefully hitting the muzzle of a cleared/practice gun with an open palm). Since she's so small and with barely any mass, it's all technique, not strength.

For me, the subjective nature of "recoil feel" is best experienced with high-end 1911s, where just a little trick of tuning can significantly affect the experience. A good friend of mine - and a high-end 1911 collector - once lined up for me an All-Star lineup of high-end 1911s, all in .45 ACP, to sample. I did the taste test blind, and ended up preferring the least costly of the bunch (the Springfield Professional) because of the way it recoiled in my hands. :lol:
 

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Bringing "muzzle flip" into the discussion is perhaps the most meaningful parameter for competition shooters. I have the XDm 5.25 in .40 and it is one of the best shooting guns I've owned for IDPA as it is not at all tiring in a minor power loading and with a 14 lb. spring pretty much returns to where the sights were by the time I'm ready for the followup shot. Wanting something to shoot in 9mm that would be similar, I recently bought the XDm 5.25 in 9mm, only to find it pretty much unuseable due not to the sharp recoil but to the exaggerated muzzle flip which leaves me looking for the target on each followup shot. I also have the .45 version and while I like the feel of the gun, it is useful only in CDP as the brass fails to seal in the chamber with lighter loads, resulting in a face full of hot gas. Checking with Springfield for advice resulted in being told to shoot only factory ammo in the gun. In a competition gun ? Really ? So if you're looking for a competition gun for the action sports, the .40 is an awesome piece. But I'd recommend at least getting to shoot a 9mm or .45 a good bit to see if you like the way it runs with the ammo you want to shoot in it before plunking down the cash. And, my guns all have PRP trigger kits, etc. added to make them competitive. So you're looking at spending at least a couple of hundred dollars after the purchase, on a gun that's claimed to be pretty much "competition ready" out of the box. Ain't so. But if you're willing to put in some extra bucks and a little work, the .40 is a great shooter.
 

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Put 200 thru my 5 inch xd9, & 100 thru 3 diff SA .45`s today, as I'm in the mkt for a 45. The xds had manageable recoil, and I can see it's value for carry, but the grip was uncomfortable after 15rnds. Next size up was xlnt...but the winner is that xdm with 4.5 barrel..it is just outstanding. A real pleasure to shoot. It does have a bit more recoil than the 9, but I found my targets, 1 for each caliber, looked identical at the end.

I picked up the xd9 in june after selling a s&w sd9ve, and shooting a lot of pistols to find what worked best for me. Everyone that shoots it is very impressed! Big fan now of SA!
 
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