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When these steel targets are hit and fall down, what exactly happens to the projectile. It obviously doesn't ricochet back, but where does it end up? Also are fmj rounds ok to shoot at these type targets?
 

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If you are square to the targets, as you should be, and they are nice and flat, most projectiles flatten and fall to the ground. FMJ's should be OK unless they have a steel core.
 

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Hi there,

I use steel rotator targets in courses all the time. Thousands and thousands of rounds. A very small percentage of them do in fact bounce directly back. People get hit all the time. It is vitally important that people wear eye protection at all times.

Shooting pistols at steel targets (say under 1500 - 1700 fps) usually results in the bullet blowing apart or richetting with signifcantly less energy. Rifle fire at properly positioned targets usually cause bullets to break up or get deflected downwards. The rounds that blow apart spray shrapnel around their immediate vicinity. YOu can see this in paper targets erected near them.

Steel can be an extremely effective training tool. The key is to wear appropriate eye protection, shoot appropriate ammunition, and use properly maintained (non pock marked) steel plates.

NEVER EVER shoot shotgun slugs at steel plates that are up close and personal. The size of the chunks of slug that come back at you are signficant and pack a serious whallop. We only shoot slugs at cardboard.
 

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I definitely agree about the shotgun slugs. The stuff bouncing back at you is unpleasant to say the least.
 

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Last week our IPSC group added one of those Texas Star targets to a match for something different. Trying to hit steel plates as they spin can be a big challenge, and it can also be a lot of fun, too. Once you've hit one of the plates, the target begins to spin. If you hit a high target it moves slowly, if you hit a low target, it spins faster. Either way you get a good workout in leading targets and timing.
 

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Last week our IPSC group added one of those Texas Star targets to a match for something different. Trying to hit steel plates as they spin can be a big challenge, and it can also be a lot of fun, too. Once you've hit one of the plates, the target begins to spin. If you hit a high target it moves slowly, if you hit a low target, it spins faster. Either way you get a good workout in leading targets and timing.
+1 on the star...sure is a good training tool. We used it last week in our Three-gun match, with the star being the pistol target.
 
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