Springfield XD Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Several weeks ago, I purchased a German trade-in Walther P-38/P-1 and posted some pictures here on the forum. I said I would provide a range report once I returned from out of town, so here it is...

I went out to the Ft. Jackson range yesterday and ran 50 rounds through my new Walther. I would have shot more, but I accidentally grabbed an extra box of .40S&W instead of 9mm. Anyway, the first 41 rounds were merely to test function and the double action/single action feel and the gun did well, except I had one FTF with the second magazine. It could have been a couple of things like my ammo (my personal reloads) or the grease I was not able to remove prior to the shooting sessions. I eliminated the magazines as a culprit because they were new. I should have known better than to take a gun out with some grease in it, but I ASSUMED the cleaning I had already done was enough.

Back to the shooting. Most of the shooting was done off hand at 25 meters to a 25-yard Standard Pistol target. The target paper is 2ft x 2ft with a center circle measuring 5.5 inches. The middle of the circle has the 1.5 inch X-ring, with the one inch 10 and 9 rings around it. All my ammo was 115gr Midway TMJ with 4.3gr Winchester 231 and Winchester primers. Average COL was 1.165 inches. That combo is good for around 1050 fps.

For accuracy, I rested a firm two-hand grip on a set of sand bags and fired away. First three-shot string measured 1.5 inches, all on the eight ring, at the eight o'clock position. My next string opened up to 3.5 inches with one round at 11 o'clock on the ten ring, one at 1 o'clock on the eight ring, and one on the 9 ring at 10 o'clock. The final three shots all went into the ten ring and measured 2.25 inches. Not too shabby. My shots did not however match the target that had been provided with the gun, which placed eight shots to the right at 25 meters. As a point of interest, the German target provided was from 1995 and had been shot by a Herr Schramm.

In order to get reasonable accuracy with this gun, I had to raise my point of aim until the front sight was about 1/3 of its height above the rear sight notch. I noticed the front sight is stamped "2", so perhaps I need to locate a shorter sight. By the way, the sights are front ramped post with a white dot painted on it, and the rear sight is a regular notch with a white vertical bar, like a Sig. Both sights are dovetailed in place.

I have no way to measure the let off pounds, but single action was incredibly smooth and soft, comparable to my KP-95D. There is very little take-up on the single action, probably the least of any other gun I have, but it is followed by a hint of travel to actually release the hammer, I'm talking like 2mm. My other pistols have some take-up, but the let off on the hammer is a surprise, unlike the Walther. The double action was long and hard, typical for a double action auto, no surprise there. I have a couple of other SA/DA pistols and the double action for the Walther is most similar to the my PPK.

Recoil was negligible, as most 9mm pistols are. The one annoying thing was the fact that some of the empty cases would eject and hit me in the forehead. I have not had that expeience since firing a Luger many years ago. Speaking of the luger, the P-1/P-38 even feels kind of like a Luger and is a natural pointer. It balances very nicely despite most of the weight being well forward and feels quite solid. The thin grip is very nice, especially for someone like me with small hands. The magazines were new and hold eight rounds in a single column.

Fit...Everything on my Walther is pretty tight and smooth. Nice machining all around. There are absolutley no machine marks at all on the slide and barrel assembly, which are all steel, but the alloy frame does have machine marks on the sides.

Finish...the slide and barrel assembly are a very dark grey parkerized finish and it is still 100%. I wonder if Century (the importer) refinished the slide and barrel because even the area with the import stamp has no wear at all. The steel locking block is an unfinished, bright piece of solid steel. Other parts that are parkerized include the trigger, magazine release, takedown lever, the added strengthening peg (the easiest way to tell a P-1 from a P-38 ), trigger bar, hammer, and slide release. The frame does have some finish wear on the sides, but I think it's holster wear. The plastic grips are in perfect shape.

Markings: The left side of the frame is stamped with the serial number, followed by a circle with a dot and "Bw". The takedown lever and hammer have a four pointed star stamped on them. The left side of the slide has the same circle with dot as on the frame, followed by the Walther banner and "P-1 Kal 9mm". Just below that is the year of manufacture (9/77) and the same four pointed star as on the take down lever. To the right of these numbers are the last three numbers of the serial number. The "S" and "F" on the frame are in white and red, respectively.

The right side of the frame has a "W", followed by the last three numbers of the serial number, plus the two German eagle stamps. The right side of the slide has the two German eagles followed by "C.A.I. GEORGIA VT." , with "GERMANY" below that. The barrel has the two German eagles and the circle with dot stamps on the front, and the last three numbers of the serial number on the left side. The locking block has the last three numbers etched on.

Disassembly: Pretty easy and follows in line with the Beretta and Sig types. After checking the gun for safe and empty, remove the magazine. Next, pull the slide back just a bit and rotate the takedown lever. the slide and barrel assembly can now be removed as one. To remove the barrel assembly from the slide, press the button on the back of the barrel. That unlocks the barrel and allows it to slide forward. Reassembly is just the reverse, but you must ensure you press down the ejector as the slide goes back. One interesting feature of the Walther design is that there is no traditional recoil spring. Instead, the P-38/P-1 uses two very small recoil springs mounted on pins on the rear sides of the slide.

Other: The P-1/P-38 has a loaded chamber indicator pin that protrudes noticeably from just above the hammer when there is a round in the chamber. The mag release is European style, in the butt of the grip, and there is also a lanyard loop. The gun has a modern style firing pin block that keeps the pin from moving unless the trigger is pulled. There is also the manual safety on the slide which acts as a hammer drop. Two unusual things about this is that the owners manual recommends you hang on to the hammer as you use the hammer drop and the hammer still goes back with the safety engaged, but only travels about half way.

Feel free to ask me any questions.

CarlosC
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,601 Posts
Just got one last friday :mrgreen:
Unissued and born 11/79 and no eagles like yours, but all the other markings are the similar. Mine was brought into the country by Inter Ordnance, Monroe NC. I hope to shoot it on wednesday.

http://www.hs2000talk.com/viewtopic.php?t=29367

got a Armalite 180b too 8)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24,885 Posts
Very nice detailed report Carlos...Thank you.
I just recieved my monthly flier from SOG and see that the P-1's in new condition are going for $259.95...Not at all a bad price. The WWII Nazi-marked P-38's are listed at $499.00, while the non-marked P-38's are priced at $249.95.
Only the WWII Nazi-marked are considered C&R.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
556 Posts
I took my P.38 AC-43 out for the first time yesterday. It was just an impromptu `plinking' session with some friends, so I can't give a "range report" per se. However, I can say that it was a heck of a lot of fun to shoot, and I'm quite happy with my purchase. It's not every day that I get to shoot a piece of history!

-James
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top