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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Finally got a chance to take the AK out where I can try it out (yeah baby!). The mags loaded really really easy (very cool). OK, insert the front edge of the mag and rock back (snick!). So far so good, now take aim at that 25 yard target and get read...BANG!

I wasn't quite prepared for the lighter-than-expected trigger pull, nor the stronger-than-expected recoil. What a way to lose yer AK virginity!

Let's try that again. Aim at the target and now try the trigger. BANG! BANG! BANG! BANG! Think I'm getting the hang of this. From a rest, all the 25 hits are centered horizonally, but about 3" high, but less than a 1½ group. Not bad.

Try the 100-yard target. Let 5 rounds fly. All hit the paper, but about 8-10" high, but still reasonably centered horizontally. Sounds like a front sight adjustment is in order. From what I can find info-wise, looks like I need a full turn up to fix the high shots. Anyone care to confirm this?

This gun is a blast to shoot, and feels strong and quick enough to stop a riot (big Tim Allen grunt!). I'm hooked.
 

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Move the sight post in 1/2 turn increments, then fine tune it. Also be aware that there is no sight mark for 100yds. Bring the rear sight slide all the back as far as it will go and then give it a slight push forward till it clicks. this is the 'battle' setting which is about the same as the 300m mark. Also, find the best way to reveal your target with the front post. at 100m (not yards) I like a six o'clock hold. The tip of my front post is at the bottom of my point of aim...but this is just what I like, all shooters are different.

Most like this a 'zero hold' on a 6" (black) circle at 100y



I like this, a '6'oclock hold on a 6" (black) circle at 100y
 

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Move the sight post in 1/2 turn increments, then fine tune it. Also be aware that there is no sight mark for 100yds. Bring the rear sight slide all the back as far as it will go and then give it a slight push forward till it clicks. this is the 'battle' setting which is about the same as the 300m mark. Also, find the best way to reveal your target with the front post. at 100m (not yards) I like a six o'clock hold. The tip of my front post is at the bottom of my point of aim...but this is just what I like, all shooters are different.

Most like this a 'zero hold' on a 6" (black) circle at 100y



I like this, a '6'oclock hold on a 6" (black) circle at 100y
That is good rock solid info right there. Thanks for posting that.
Scott
 

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The forum is happy to have the
expertise and knowledge which
is dispensed. Very helpful to all
of us.

Ed
 

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Einheit (or anyone else), I have a question about the six o'clock sight picture. I've seen it described in other places, including in my XD manual, but I've never quite figured it out . . . .

From your description, it looks clear enough -- if you're shooting at a six-inch circle at 100 yards, put the top of the front sight post on the bottom of the circle. Okay, no problem.

But what if you're shooting at a two-inch circle at 100 yards? Do you need to "eyeball" it, and put the front sight post two inches BELOW the circle? And wouldn't that inherently be rather inaccurate, because you need to guess at the distance? And even worse if you're shooting at something that's not a known-sized target?

It seems to me that the first sight picture, with the top of the front sight right at the center of the target, would be spot-on regardless of the target you're shooting.

I'm still trying to figure this out . . . please educate me. Thank you!
 

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Einheit (or anyone else), I have a question about the six o'clock sight picture. I've seen it described in other places, including in my XD manual, but I've never quite figured it out . . . .

From your description, it looks clear enough -- if you're shooting at a six-inch circle at 100 yards, put the top of the front sight post on the bottom of the circle. Okay, no problem.

But what if you're shooting at a two-inch circle at 100 yards? Do you need to "eyeball" it, and put the front sight post two inches BELOW the circle? And wouldn't that inherently be rather inaccurate, because you need to guess at the distance? And even worse if you're shooting at something that's not a known-sized target?

It seems to me that the first sight picture, with the top of the front sight right at the center of the target, would be spot-on regardless of the target you're shooting.

I'm still trying to figure this out . . . please educate me. Thank you!
On a 2" circle, the top of my sight would be at the bottom of that 2" circle (ie. 1" low). You would have a very hard time seeing 2" at 100y though. One thing you are not considering...there is no 100y setting on an AK, the 6'oclock hold makes up for that (half of the 6" circle, ie. 3" low). the sights on my AKs that i use the most are as close to dead on that my eyes can make them. So that means I do not tough the front sight for elevation, only the rear. So if I held center as in the first pick, POI (point of impact) would be higher than POA (point of aim) since the rear sight cannot go any lower and adjusting the front sight would destroy the "zero'd" sights.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Great info! I should get a chance to try this out in the next day or 2. Many thanks.
 

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Thanks for that, einheit.

I understand that there is a 100 meter setting on the AK, rather than 100 yards, so if you have a properly zeroed AK then you'll need a bit of a fudge factor if shooting at 100 yards.

Let me ask one more question.

In your first post, you said that you would put the front sight at the bottom of the 6" circle. Therefore, the bullet would strike 3" above the front sight.

Then, you said that if you were shooting at a 2" circle (assuming you could see it!), your front sight would be at the bottom of the 2" circle.

So . . . wouldn't the bullet then strike 2" above the bullseye (i.e., 3" above the front sight.)?

Maybe I'm still missing something fundamental here . . . it seems that you're saying that you'd place the front sight at the bottom of the circle, regardless of how large or small the circle is.

Thanks again.
 

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I wasn't quite prepared for the lighter-than-expected trigger pull, nor the stronger-than-expected recoil. What a way to lose yer AK virginity!
Ahhh! Wuss. :) Pull the trigger on a Mosin M38 sometime, if you think the AK has stout recoil.

From what I can find info-wise, looks like I need a full turn up to fix the high shots. Anyone care to confirm this?
Try it and see?
 

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Thanks for that, einheit.

I understand that there is a 100 meter setting on the AK, rather than 100 yards, so if you have a properly zeroed AK then you'll need a bit of a fudge factor if shooting at 100 yards.

Let me ask one more question.

In your first post, you said that you would put the front sight at the bottom of the 6" circle. Therefore, the bullet would strike 3" above the front sight.

Then, you said that if you were shooting at a 2" circle (assuming you could see it!), your front sight would be at the bottom of the 2" circle.

So . . . wouldn't the bullet then strike 2" above the bullseye (i.e., 3" above the front sight.)?

Maybe I'm still missing something fundamental here . . . it seems that you're saying that you'd place the front sight at the bottom of the circle, regardless of how large or small the circle is.

Thanks again.
Just because I aim at 6'oclock, it doesn't mean that the bullet is gonna strike the bulls eye. What it does is give me a good reference point that is easier to come back to time and again instead of trying to stay centered on a white X or an orange/red dot. it also give reference on the sight hood if I am shooting at a smaller target. What you are saying is true, the rifle is sitting at a different angle if you look at it from the side. The one thing it does do well is to to teach you how to compensate easier and recognize what kind of adjustments to make as conditions change without having to stop and adjust sights if you are making critical shots like in a competition or shooting at game going away from you. I love front sight hoods/protectors for that very reason. You can actually use it as a make shift ranging device/secondary sight. I hope I'm not confusing you too much...this is just my 'style' of shooting passed down to me by the 'men of war' in my family. My grandfather use to tell me, 'if you wanna shoot a man in the head, aim for his chin-always leave the centre of mass open when its in your sights'. The same hold true for shots to the torso, my POA will be the centre of the abdomen, bullets will strike from collar bone to diaphragm....the AKs sights are crude, totally different than using the peep sights on most other rifles, so it requires a different aiming technique. This technique works for any sight on any weapon and it may not be a dead on bullseye, but it keep your groups as tight as they can possibly get because its easier for you to go back to the original POA everytime without having to concentrate on the front sight so much.
 

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Just because I aim at 6'oclock, it doesn't mean that the bullet is gonna strike the bulls eye. What it does is give me a good reference point that is easier to come back to time and again instead of trying to stay centered on a white X or an orange/red dot. it also give reference on the sight hood if I am shooting at a smaller target. What you are saying is true, the rifle is sitting at a different angle if you look at it from the side. The one thing it does do well is to to teach you how to compensate easier and recognize what kind of adjustments to make as conditions change without having to stop and adjust sights if you are making critical shots like in a competition or shooting at game going away from you. I love front sight hoods/protectors for that very reason. You can actually use it as a make shift ranging device/secondary sight. I hope I'm not confusing you too much...this is just my 'style' of shooting passed down to me by the 'men of war' in my family. My grandfather use to tell me, 'if you wanna shoot a man in the head, aim for his chin-always leave the centre of mass open when its in your sights'. The same hold true for shots to the torso, my POA will be the centre of the abdomen, bullets will strike from collar bone to diaphragm....the AKs sights are crude, totally different than using the peep sights on most other rifles, so it requires a different aiming technique. This technique works for any sight on any weapon and it may not be a dead on bullseye, but it keep your groups as tight as they can possibly get because its easier for you to go back to the original POA everytime without having to concentrate on the front sight so much.
Hello and +1 on your sighting style I was taught the same way this is my first post just joined for the reccord to the OP congrats and enjoy I just got a Century Yugo the weather has been less than cooperative so no range yet
 

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Just because I aim at 6'oclock, it doesn't mean that the bullet is gonna strike the bulls eye. What it does is give me a good reference point that is easier to come back to time and again instead of trying to stay centered on a white X or an orange/red dot. it also give reference on the sight hood if I am shooting at a smaller target. What you are saying is true, the rifle is sitting at a different angle if you look at it from the side. The one thing it does do well is to to teach you how to compensate easier and recognize what kind of adjustments to make as conditions change without having to stop and adjust sights if you are making critical shots like in a competition or shooting at game going away from you. I love front sight hoods/protectors for that very reason. You can actually use it as a make shift ranging device/secondary sight. I hope I'm not confusing you too much...this is just my 'style' of shooting passed down to me by the 'men of war' in my family. My grandfather use to tell me, 'if you wanna shoot a man in the head, aim for his chin-always leave the centre of mass open when its in your sights'. The same hold true for shots to the torso, my POA will be the centre of the abdomen, bullets will strike from collar bone to diaphragm....the AKs sights are crude, totally different than using the peep sights on most other rifles, so it requires a different aiming technique. This technique works for any sight on any weapon and it may not be a dead on bullseye, but it keep your groups as tight as they can possibly get because its easier for you to go back to the original POA everytime without having to concentrate on the front sight so much.
Gotcha!

Thank you very much for taking the time to provide all of your responses! I really appreciate that.
 
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