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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Search has been pretty good here, was surprised nothing came up about this.

The stock grip is hard like a rock so before I install a rubberized grip, was going to use my summer motorcycle gloves so I can shoot some rounds on my new XDs.

Pros & Cons? Recommendations?

Just wondering if it is worth investing on dedicated range gloves? Let's face it, when you have to use it, you won't have time to put them on.
 

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I'm just going to be nice and say I have no opinion.
 

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will you be wearing the 'cycle gloves when you are in a self defense situation? If not, then I would suggest the grip sleeve / rubberized grip. That way, you train with what you will be using every day for a defensive situation.

With that being said, I haven't been wearing any gloves since I started, but need to start working on that. Less of a problem for my edc guns, since I don't expect to be wearing gloves on the street..... but when working with the AR or shotgun... and perhaps the "full size" handgun which may be needed outside the home, gloves could very well be useful / requirement.

I'm figuring on some sort of "mechanix wear" type glove to provide abrasion and cut protection. Not sure if I need to wear what the military has with knuckle protection and heavier since I'm not really planning on conducting breeching maneuvers. :)
 

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I never shoot with gloves. The XD serious doesn't have enough smack in it to warrant me wanting any personally.

And I would likely never be wearing them in an SD situation.

There's note than one maker of dedicated shooting gloves though. They typically have soft suede palms that are padded.

If you really think you need them or they'll benefit you from keeping hand fatigue at bay for extended sessions then go for it. I'd definitely run a few lags bare handed too though.
 

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I'm just going to be nice and say I have no opinion.
Are you picturing this?


OP, no gloves if you can help it. In NJ, it gets cold so practice accordingly but practice with how you plan to carry.

For most of us, gloves bring up an image of guys like above.
 

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Like the rest said practice with how you plan to carry. Gloves are good for winter when it's cold but not worth it unless you ride constantly. If you ride constantly then maybe half and half. like a situation you may be on the bike and just pulled in somewhere. But most likely you won't wear gloves when you need your firearm

sent by the german shepherd next to me
 

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For long days of shooting, I am hooked on the Wiley-X CAGs. They have proven themselves to me when it mattered. The material provides a great grip on the hottest summer days (129 degrees in SW Afghan), but still allows for a great touch on the trigger. However, I do not see my self wearing my CAGs when I would need to utilize my weapon stateside. I shoot gloveless the first hour or so, and break out my gloves only for extended range time.
 

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For long days of shooting, I am hooked on the Wiley-X CAGs. They have proven themselves to me when it mattered. The material provides a great grip on the hottest summer days (129 degrees in SW Afghan), but still allows for a great touch on the trigger. However, I do not see my self wearing my CAGs when I would need to utilize my weapon stateside. I shoot gloveless the first hour or so, and break out my gloves only for extended range time.
Welcome to the forum, and thank you for your service :D
 

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I have worn mechanics type gloves when shooting outdoors in lower temps. they are not very warm but at least keep the direct cold air/wind off bare skin and don't get in the way.
 

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I do carry when on my motorcycle, so I do periodically practice shooting with my fingerless motorcycle gloves.
(If the need were to arise, I don't plan on taking my gloves OFF before shooting)
No problem. :)
 

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I also carry while riding. Don't know if this has anything to do with it, but when I open carry people don't tend to flip me off or cut me off when I carry open on my bike.
 

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I carry when on my bike as well, but the deerskin gauntlets I wear wouldn't work well for shooting. No problem as it's extremely unlikely I'd never shoot while the bike is moving.
 

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OK, everyone who knows me knows that I'm all for consistency and realism when training. :)

EDC Training Equipment suggestions - need your input

^ I have the same screen-name there. You can see my replies when it comes to "keeping things real." :lol:

So, Sweetlu, as the others have mentioned, if you're not going to necessarily always be shooting with your gloves on, it's worth keeping this in-mind during your practice sessions, as gloves can both make some things worse as well as better.

For example, Jack Leuba (Faliure2Stop on M4C.net) brought up an instance of pistol-manipulations problems that were induced by their use - it didn't happen in one of their open-enrollment classes, either: it happened in a restricted .mil class in which real-life tip-of-the-spear guys found out that doing an overhand "power-stroke" to release the slide during reloads would often cause their gloves to catch in the ejection port of the pistol, causing a stoppage. Similarly,on DC.com, Florida member Adric22 went to the range one day in the heat of summer, only to find that with sweaty hands - without his shooting gloves, he could not successfully run the slide on his defensive/carry gun.

If you're going to use gloves, yes, specific-to-task "shooting gloves" can often make your trip more pleasurable, but you'll want to keep their use in-context.

Certainly, you can start by trying your riding gloves. This will also give you the benefit of understanding what manipulations will work when you have the gloves on - which may very well be how you need to shoot to defend yourself if you're confronted while riding.

For those of us who live in colder areas, gloves are often a necessity of everyday life in the winter months, so being sure that our everyday wear gloves will actually work with our everyday carry gun (and gear) is important.

And even for those who say that they only practice without gloves because that's how they will shoot, it's worth remembering that if your fingers and hands are numb from the cold, then they'll be more difficult to work with during the draw and while shooting as well. For these individuals, does your practice actually include getting out to the range when it's as cold as it can get in your winters, and waiting 'till your hands are numb from the cold before you start practicing your draws, shooting, and manipulations? Have you practiced without (or with) gloves in freezing rain, sleet, and snow?

It's really all about context, and if all you want is a set of gloves to increase your comfort on extended range outings, then, honestly, there's no wrong in that, either (how many people take high-round count AR classes without gloves?). :)

Padding on the gloves in specific places can often help with recoil harshness as well as the physical texturing of the gun - just remember that too much padding on the palms may cause you to have problems gripping the gun. If the top of the web of your thumb/index finger hurts, some gloves have padding there, too.

Look for one with a "grippy" texture on the palm to help you get a better purchase on the grip, if that's what you need. If you shoot outdoors, this can be a big factor when it rains or snows.

Full-fingered or fingerless is really a personal preference. With full-fingered ones, be sure that with your trigger finger, no glove material will get trapped between the trigger and the trigger guard (this can happen at the top of the trigger, where it swings into the frame, but can also happen frequently at the base of the trigger, where loose material may trap itself between the trigger and the trigger guard) and potentially cause interference. Even if you don't see this during initial testing (or even with extended use), be sure you still mentally rehearse what you should do in case it does happen so that you don't wind up with a negligent discharge. With both types of gloves, look for a good fit along the ulnar ("heel" and pinky) side of the glove, so that if you rack the slide, you don't end up with glove material getting caught up in the ejection port. As with the trigger finger concern, again, even if this doesn't happen with your gloves, it's still good to mentally rehearse the steps you'll need to undertake in order to clear it safely, as it will always be a possibility.

And again, your riding gloves can work just fine: just remember that these same considerations will apply.

:)
 

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I used to use a motorcycle glove when shooting my Ruger .454 Casull, even with "light" loads it was a beast. I do not use gloves when shooting anything else including the XDS, although I do get a blister from it after a while.
 

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I wore gloves in northern Canada but don't need them down here.

.... oh you meant while shooting ... nope
 

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Mechanix brand gloves from Walmart or automotive stores. I prefer the light duty but the originals work too.
 

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The stock grip is hard like a rock so before I install a rubberized grip, was going to use my summer motorcycle gloves so I can shoot some rounds
:oops::oops::oops:
 
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