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I had a friend of mine pick me up some Gold Dot ammo. I thought he knew what to get, but he came back with some that I'm not sure if they will have enough stink behind em to be a good SD round or not. He grabbed a box of 9mm luger 124gr and a box of 115gr GDHP's. Are these going to be a heavy enough projectiles and loads behind em? Neither one is +p. Hopefully I didn't just blow $40. I didn't want to stick him with em even though they're not what I was expecting. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks guys.
 

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Speer 9 mm 124 - gr. GDHP Ammo. Muzzle velocity: 1,150 F.P.S. Muzzle energy: 364 ft. lbs.

Speer 9 mm 124 - gr. +P GDHP Ammo. Muzzle velocity: 1,220 F.P.S. Muzzle energy: 410 ft. lbs.

Speer 9 mm 147 - gr. GDHP Ammo. Muzzle velocity: 985 F.P.S. Muzzle energy: 326 ft. lbs.

Gold dots are some of the best SD ammo period. And contrary to popular belief, bad guys really dont care what they get shot with :rolleyes:. As you can see the +P doesnt add that much, but will give you more muzzle flip and flash (bad for follow-up shots or night vision) The heaver 147gr load has the least energy and will penetrate less. I'd be confident w/ the 124gr + good shot placement.
 

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Send 'em to me. They're a waste of your money. In fact I'll be so kind hearted as to send you $20 for your troubled mind.
 

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I wouldn't sweat the lack of +P. It's definitely better for night vision and recoil control. Plus, those +P's are LOUD!
 

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The heaver 147gr load has the least energy and will penetrate less. I'd be confident w/ the 124gr + good shot placement.
Are you saying that I should stop using my 16lb bowling ball and use a baseball? I can throw a baseball a lot faster than I can roll that 16 ponder!
I think that a 147 gr bullet will penetrate as much as, or more, than a 124 gr bullet (and both being the same type, ie. hp, fmj, etc...) that is fired from the same caliber gun.
terminal 9mm luger
Best9mm.com - 9mm Ammunition testing 9mm ammo ballistics bullet expansion penetration
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Thanks for the replies guys. I knew you'd help me out. I'm glad they'll work. So even the 115grs are alright? I guess it just depends how many shots and where I put em huh? :) Thanks again guys.
 

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Are you saying that I should stop using my 16lb bowling ball and use a baseball? I can throw a baseball a lot faster than I can roll that 16 ponder!
I think that a 147 gr bullet will penetrate as much as, or more, than a 124 gr bullet (and both being the same type, ie. hp, fmj, etc...) that is fired from the same caliber gun.
terminal 9mm luger
Best9mm.com - 9mm Ammunition testing 9mm ammo ballistics bullet expansion penetration
I haven't seen any data for the gold dots, but usually the heavier bullets do penetrate more. Might not be as much energy, but it's certainly going deeper.
 

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It's not just about the foot lbs. Here's a pic of a terminal ballistics test done my DocGKR.


 

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I respect and trust in Doc Roberts' opinions on terminal ballistics, but that old photo of the gel block comparison shown above IMO is not an accurate depiction of the differences in various handgun bullets

this image shows a wider variation in wounding properties:



Some are sphere-shaped and taper off, indicating rapid, explosive expansion [115gr, 125gr .357 Sig, 125gr .357 Mag].. Some are football-shaped and demonstrate slower bullet expansion [165gr and 180gr .40 S&W, 230gr .45 ACP]

*Note the complete lack of temporary stretch cavity with the FMJ bullet--only when the bullet yawed at 12"-13" did it make any sort of temp cavity
 

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What's the source of these photos? I can't read the ruler very well but it looks like the 125gr sig didn't penetrate the required 12" minimum. Remember stretch cavity (the large colored areas) really don't indicate any kind of significant wounding potential. The Crush cavity caused by the expanded bullet and depth of penetration is what's important. (the thinner trialling colored line after the stretch cavity)
 

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What's the source of these photos? I can't read the ruler very well but it looks like the 125gr sig didn't penetrate the required 12" minimum. Remember stretch cavity (the large colored areas) really don't indicate any kind of significant wounding potential. The Crush cavity caused by the expanded bullet and depth of penetration is what's important. (the thinner trialling colored line after the stretch cavity)
The photos are obtained from several different sources
No, in calibrated bare gel, the 125gr W-W Ranger T doesn't quite make the 12" mark

The temporary cavity indicates subtle, yet significant differences in bullet penetration and terminal ballistics in various bullets

IMO, the temp cavity is a good estimate in determining how rapidly a bullet expands.
Whether it aids in, or is a contributing factor in incapacitation, it is a subject that needs further study.

Personally, i want a bullet to rapidly expand, then hold that expanded-shape through the entire path of penetration. DPX immediately comes to mind.
 

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Kinetic energy does not wound. Temporary cavity does not wound. The much discussed
"shock" of bullet impact is a fable and "knock down" power is a myth. The critical
element is penetration. The bullet must pass through the large, blood bearing organs
and be of sufficient diameter to promote rapid bleeding. Penetration less than 12
inches is too little, and, in the words of two of the participants in the 1987 Wound
Ballistics Workshop, "too little penetration will get you killed." 42,43 Given desirable
and reliable penetration, the only way to increase bullet effectiveness is to increase
the severity of the wound by increasing the size of hole made by the bullet. Any bullet
which will not penetrate through vital organs from less than optimal angles is not
acceptable. Of those that will penetrate, the edge is always with the bigger bullet.
Interpretation of FBI gelatin tests
 

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The photos are obtained from several different sources
No, in calibrated bare gel, the 125gr W-W Ranger T doesn't quite make the 12" mark

The temporary cavity indicates subtle, yet significant differences in bullet penetration and terminal ballistics in various bullets

IMO, the temp cavity is a good estimate in determining how rapidly a bullet expands.
Whether it aids in, or is a contributing factor in incapacitation, it is a subject that needs further study.

Personally, i want a bullet to rapidly expand, then hold that expanded-shape through the entire path of penetration. DPX immediately comes to mind.
Rampant, because the ruler looked the same in all photos, I thought that I would help find the source. I ended up doing a lot of searching and reading (enjoyed the learning). I came across an article that might be of interest to you and others:
The damage which is created by a projectile is caused by three different mechanisms. The first is laceration and crushing which is the sole method by which low-velocity handguns cause damage to tissue. Higher velocity weapons will stretch the tissue in the wake of the bullet, forming what is called a temporary cavity as well as the smaller permanent cavity as can be seen in the next couple of slides. A controversial subject is that of shock waves which are present and travel ahead of the bullet which last a few microseconds. It was once theorized that these shock waves could cause damage to the tissues; however, this has been refuted in recent studies. The temporary cavity is created by stretching forces in a vacuum in the wake of a bullet, and the volume of this cavity is proportional to the energy which is transferred, with a maximum diameter being measured at 10 to 40 times the bullet diameter. This temporary cavity will actually collapse and reform repeatedly with a diminishing amplitude until it settles down to what will be the permanent cavity. This entire process only lasts one to five milliseconds
Gunshot Wound Ballistics
 
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