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Discussion Starter #1
I've spent some time with the QD Laser from LaserLyte at the range and want to give some feedback.

My first postings for the unit are:
1 - Thread with links to pictures of the QD Laser sight.
2 - Thread about Fobus holster that will allow laser sights to remain attached.

A little more complex - Two eyes rather than one
Off-hand, I have to point the iron sights a little high and to the right to get my laser (and bullet strikes) in the bullseye. This means that the laser disappears to my vision when my left eye (non-primary eye) is closed. To overcome this problem for now, I have started aiming with both of my eyes open. My left eye sees the laser at the target and my right eye looks down the sights. I concentrate on focusing on the iron sights, and allowing the laser to move out of clear focus, but still keeping it on target. It is working, but it isn't easy. Trying to watch the laser dot with my left eye and my iron sights with my right eye like this is not an acceptable long-term solution for me. So now I am researching adjustable rear sights, so that I can eventually adjust the iron sights so that the laser dot is also visible to my right eye just above the front sight.

The Tactical Holster - Not sure
I know that if I want to carry the pistol with the QD Laser on, then I will have to use a holster that can handle the laser also. The Fobus tactical holster (seen in one of my threads above) still does not have the most comfortable draw for me. I prefer pulling the pistol upwards. With the Fobus , I have to pull slightly back, then up and over. It's OK, but it takes a bit more effort to get the pistol on target. I think, ideally, I would rather have a larger holster that allows the pistol to come straight upward.

Self-Defense - Switch on
When I draw the pistol, aim and fire in all in a second, it is still not possible for me to also think about pressing the laser switch on. I can have it on by the second or third shot. For my hands, that means moving my left hand slightly forward and pressing the switch with my thumb, then quickly re-establishing my grip. That's a bit of a weakness, because I prefer to not let go of the pistol in that situation. With practice, I think this switching on can become more reflexive.

Aiming and Steadiness Aid - Impressive
The laser dot, when on target, really helps me to understand how imprecise my aiming could be with the iron sights. A little movement of the gun's aim - like moving the light from one side of the front sight to the other in the slot of the back sight, and moves the laser way off target (I mean like at least a foot).

Be careful - these things are bright!
If you aim this laser at yourself in a mirror (like when dry firing) - be very careful to avoid your eyes. Yes - I know about the warning labels. I was trying to be "careful". Well - I accidently flashed it past one of my eyes for a split second, and I was seeing a red dot - and nothing else - for at least 10 seconds.
 

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nice write up... i appreciate it man... like i replied in that other post where the guy got the qd and some grips and was commenting... i was curious to learn a little more about hte product from a first hand user's perspective. So how much did you pay for it and is it worth it overall?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Eric_Oh said:
nice write up... i appreciate it man... like i replied in that other post where the guy got the qd and some grips and was commenting... i was curious to learn a little more about hte product from a first hand user's perspective. So how much did you pay for it and is it worth it overall?
I'm glad to be of help.

The Super Bright (the model I purchased) costs just over $100 including shipping from Night Vision Sales. See these two links:

1000 yard QD635 Laser from Night Vision
500 yard QD650 Laser from Night Vision

There service was good. I ordered on Friday afternoon. They shipped on Monday, and I got the unit on a Tues or Weds.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Oh - I didn't answer your question: Is it worth it overall?

My answer is YES. Even if I don't wear the pistol with the laser (CCW), it is very useful for me in other ways - like in dry fire, at the range, or in home defense.

For example, for the first time ever I've got a pretty good idea of how high my gun moves during recoil. Also, I'm learning to break a bad habit of slow-motion follow through (bringing my aim back on target after recoil). Now I concentrate more on getting that red dot back on target immediately after recoil.

Also consider this - One of the steps of self-defense is doing whatever it takes to make the bad guy to hesistate by forcing him to make an adjustment in his next move. I've discovered (from my mirror experience) that running the laser past his eyes would most likely cause that response. What is he going to do if he is momentarily blinded? That's enough time, in my opinion, to gain the upper hand in a confrontation. (I'm no tactical expert - but this seems like it would work to me.)
 

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very good report.
you sold me.

is there significant difference between the 500 and 1000 yard lights?
my shooting will be from 3 to 15 yards i. e. across a bedroom to short range at the range.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
phil evans said:
very good report.
you sold me.

is there significant difference between the 500 and 1000 yard lights?
my shooting will be from 3 to 15 yards i. e. across a bedroom to short range at the range.
I can only guess that the 500 yd laser is half the brightness of the 1000. If this is true, then the 500 yard laser is plenty bright indoors - especially in a house.

About 3 Yards
I'm glad you mentioned 3 yards - It reminds me to explain this:
The laser vector is not parallel to the vector of the barrel. It points at a slight angle upward so that at some distance in front of you the laser and bullet path get very close. For me that seems to be at 15 or maybe 20 feet. At 10 feet or less, the laser dot is probably around an inch low. At close ranges, an inch low is probably not going to cause a significant miss. If I had to aim at an errant dog in a hurry, then the laser would still be a great tool even close range. Then there's the psychological impact on the potential human attacker. He knows he's targeted.
 

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mcone, thanks for the info as well. I read your post & to add some stuff. I too bought the Super-Bright model from Nightvision Sales in Indiana. My buddy has the regular model & cannot see the dot when outside during mid-day. (Unless within 5 yards & overcast skies) My super-bright can be visible (barely) in sunlight with a white target out to 15 to 20 yards.

One other thing to add as to the difference between the 500 yard & 1000 yard models are the battery life. 4.5 hours continuous on for 500 yard & 1.5 hours continuous on for the 1000 yard model.
 

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My thoughts only.
Most hostile life threatening events are within range (7yards)of normal combat POA, usually a parasympathetic control. Meaning, enough CQB training and your muscle memory does the work.

I personally believe the laser is best used when you are in a compromised position taking cover and shooting from an awkward position.
I also believe the laser, combined with a tactical HI light (Surefire) is an effective force on force multiplier.

Having both, and using both, with, for example the XD-40 subcompact is just not possible to do in 3 seconds.
I believe, given the choice, as a citizen, a high intensity tactical mounted light will disable the hostile enough to submission and also give you enough information about who the hostile(s) are. Identification of the bad guy is important.

I also believe, if using a laser, and having to take cover, with the intent to, should we say, continue the fight is bad for the citizen. If the hostile starts to run away, I'm going to run away to a safe place and call 911.
Example. It's night. Your at a mall parked in a low lighted area. You see the outline of 2 people approaching quickly and at 20 feet start verbally harassing you and your wife, kids etc. The car is locked and you don't have time to get in and drive away. It's too dark to see if these 2 people have any weapons, but you draw your weapon, turn on the laser and point it at mid upper torso of one of the people. Then you hear; "what the fu are you trying to do pointing that laser at me. Do you have a gun? Let me see it", as they move closer. You tell them if they come any closer you will shoot. They say;"hey dude, all we want to do is see your gun." You shoot them and later find out one of the guys, the one being stupid was drunk, with his girlfriend. No weapons were found on them.
Problem, target identification. You had no idea who was the aggressor nor if he(they) had any weapons. Murder!

A nice bright tac light would have temporarily blinded them and best of all you would have been able to identify the threat level. I believe light is the better force multiplier than the laser, for the citizen. And, I believe they would have thought you were an off duty COP.

Bottom line, within the first 3 seconds, if you can demonstrate more power than the hostile, usually the hostile will back down and run away. That's a good thing. It's a known fact, a sudden burst of bright light will make a person freeze. Lasering, the person may not even see the spot on his/her chest. No one gets hurt and you can call 911 and let the Officers apprehend. And, with the light, you have a description of the suspect.

Bearing a CCW for the law abiding citizen carries a lot of responsibility. If you can run away, run and call 911. If you can't, and there is no doubt in your mind the hostile has a weapon and intent to kill you, shoot.

Take and participate in training as much as you can afford, for weapon handling and psycological knowledge.

Regards,
tgiint
 
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