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this was a conversation I had with a few buddies. Ok so heres the scenario your gun slide is locked open you shove in a full mag and...... do you hit the slide release button or pull back on the slide and let it go? some of the guys say by hitting the release button you can damage the spring and some of the guys said thats what the button is for and some said either way is fine one way isnt better then the other. we all but a few own at least one XD. So I turn to the forum what do you do and why?
 

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Personally I think either is fine, depending on your preference. Personally, I usually slingshot the slide but that's just me.
 

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I practice the "slingshot" method, where you use the other hand to pull back the slide and let it slingshot forward. I practice this mainly because it's what a lot of trainers teach, and because I feel it's easier to do in a high stress situation. It's also better since the slide is a large piece of metal that I can easily grasp and manipulate, while the slide lock is small and can be very difficult to disengage. I'd rather use the slide lock release method as a backup if both hands are not available.
 

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There are many threads on this. I think several of them are over 10 pages long. Try searching.
 

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this was a conversation I had with a few buddies. Ok so heres the scenario your gun slide is locked open you shove in a full mag and...... do you hit the slide release button or pull back on the slide and let it go? some of the guys say by hitting the release button you can damage the spring and some of the guys said thats what the button is for and some said either way is fine one way isnt better then the other. we all but a few own at least one XD. So I turn to the forum what do you do and why?
I slingshot. You'll get opinions, of course, but I think slingshotting is quicker and better for all scenarios.

I don't think damage is a concern. Think about how the slide slams back and forth while rounds are being fired.
 

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Been slingshoting for years.its faster too///////////////
Just curious.... it doesn't make sense that the sling shot would be faster... I haven't compared it live firing, but just from the ergonimics it makes more sense for the slide release method to be faster because it has fewer movements.

I.e. using the slide release, the weak thumb can release the slide release while the grip is being re-established, but with the slingshot, the weak hand must move above the gun, grab the slide, and pull it away from the dominant hand, and then move back forward to re-establish the grip.

Comments??

Alchemist77
 

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Just curious.... it doesn't make sense that the sling shot would be faster... I haven't compared it live firing, but just from the ergonimics it makes more sense for the slide release method to be faster because it has fewer movements.

I.e. using the slide release, the weak thumb can release the slide release while the grip is being re-established, but with the slingshot, the weak hand must move above the gun, grab the slide, and pull it away from the dominant hand, and then move back forward to re-establish the grip.

Comments??

Alchemist77
I find the slide release on the XD a bit difficult.
 

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I think it comes down to personal preference, however I was given a great piece of advice and that is no matter what semi-auto gun you pick up racking the slide will always send it home. Meaning that on some guns it can be confusing which lever or button is the slide release (the slide is always going to slide forward when you pull it and let go) and therefore getting in the habit of just racking the slide you have a more consistent way of handling your firearm or others if needed.

With that said, pushing the release is fine if you want to do it, personally I like to rack the slide.
 

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Well The only time IMO you should manualy operate the slide, is if you have a malafunction. So yes you should be able to do so, incase of malfunction. Some people may not pull the slide back with enough force, to allow it to properly seat a round in the chamber (baby it). I have seen it happen. In the service we were always tought to use the slde release, and only rack the slide in case of malfunction. Use what works best for you, and what is most comfortable. It is much fatser for me to use the slide release when reloading. I insert a fresh mag, as my weak hand comes up to mate with my strong hand I hit the slide release. Honestly it would take me 1-2 seconds longer to rack the slide manualy. Practice both, and find a weapon that is comfortable for you too do both.
 

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I'm gonna go against the grain here; I use the slide release to send the slide forward. Mainly because when I learned pistol shooting in the military with the Beretta M9, we were trained to use the slide release. I personally don't think I could be faster if I tried to slingshot it, but then again I've drilled tens of thousands of times using the slide release.

Really it depends on how you train. Either way can be equally as quick IMHO, you just have to commit to your training and can't try one way for awhile and then try the other.
 

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You do this alot in USPSA matches... or well, you "shouldn't" since you shouldn't shoot to slide lock, but either way... I've trained myself to use the slide release because it is less motions and you can get back on target faster from a reload... obviously if theres a jam or something you get both hands on the problem...
 

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I find using my thumb to release the slide is more natural, comfortable, and faster for me... I agree with rystineusmc0311 that practice what you are comfortable with and practice, practice, practice to be the fastest you can be with that technique.

Don
 

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Well The only time IMO you should manualy operate the slide, is if you have a malafunction. So yes you should be able to do so, incase of malfunction. Some people may not pull the slide back with enough force, to allow it to properly seat a round in the chamber (baby it). I have seen it happen. In the service we were always tought to use the slde release, and only rack the slide in case of malfunction. Use what works best for you, and what is most comfortable. It is much fatser for me to use the slide release when reloading. I insert a fresh mag, as my weak hand comes up to mate with my strong hand I hit the slide release. Honestly it would take me 1-2 seconds longer to rack the slide manualy. Practice both, and find a weapon that is comfortable for you too do both.
Hiya Buddy :D

Interesting things they taught you. . .

. . . and it takes you 2 EXTRA seconds to slingshot a slide? I'm pretty sure I can change a mag quicker than that.

Anyway;
The reason any firearms instructor worth his salt teaches the slingshot method is as follows:

The fine motor control required to locate and operate the slide release may well be unavailable in a high adrenaline situation. Gripping the slide between your fingers and the base of your palm requires little motor control and can be accomplished with even a severe case of the shakes.

If any of you are using the slide release and carrying a weapon, I urge you to get some good training in SD pistol.
 

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The fine motor control required to locate and operate the slide release may well be unavailable in a high adrenaline situation. Gripping the slide between your fingers and the base of your palm requires little motor control and can be accomplished with even a severe case of the shakes.
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Proper training eliminates all of that. I speak from plenty of experience.
 

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The "slingshot" method is the universal way to do it. You can do it with any gun, XD, Glock, 1911, etc. Not all guns have slide releases that work well. I've used some guns that absolutely won't release the slide when using the slide release. This is why in a defense situation it might be a good idea to use the "singshot" method, unless of course you're using a gun your very familiar with. Either way is fine though...personal preference.
 

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Just curious.... it doesn't make sense that the sling shot would be faster... I haven't compared it live firing, but just from the ergonimics it makes more sense for the slide release method to be faster because it has fewer movements.

I.e. using the slide release, the weak thumb can release the slide release while the grip is being re-established, but with the slingshot, the weak hand must move above the gun, grab the slide, and pull it away from the dominant hand, and then move back forward to re-establish the grip.

Comments??

Alchemist77
I find it faster. As a lefty, it's a natural movement to push in the mag and slingshot the slide with my right hand instead of reaching for the "release" with my finger.
 

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Proper training eliminates all of that. I speak from plenty of experience.
No, it doesn't. It's a physiological response.

Only constant practice can override a physiological response and even then there are no guarantees. Constant practice in high stress situations. Who does that every week? You?

I'll stick to practicing what has been proven to work. You can do the same.
Just don't advise people to do something that might potentially get them killed. High stress can cause severe impediment of motor control. Slingshoting will work in those situations, hitting the slide release might not.
 
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