Springfield XD Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,869 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
For those who might not know... devices such as your mobile phone have a unique serial number called the IMEI. It is communicated when your device is communicating with a cell tower.

If you have an iPhone, navigate to Settings -> General -> About and scroll down to see the IMEI for your iPhone.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,651 Posts
So does a watch that has a SIM card.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,651 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
If you have an Apple Watch that can make calls without your phone (i.e., cellular watch option), then it has a SIM. It might be a soft SIM, but it will have a SIM with an IMEI.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,869 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Some clarity:
  • IMEI. This is the serial number of your connected device, whether an iPhone, Apple Watch, Android phone, or similar. It doesn't change.
  • IMSI. Serial number for the SIM card. A SIM card used to be a physical object (looks like a shrunken SD memory card). Now you can have either a SIM card or an eSIM, which is effectively a digital SIM card. In newer phones they can simultaneously support multiple SIMs such that you can 2+ phone numbers to your device.
  • MSISDN. Your 10-digit phone number in North America.
When you power up your cellular-enabled device and it goes hunting for a cell tower then it is going to be exchanging these types of identifiers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,869 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
...and on the topic of this surveillance and a perceived conflict with the 4th Amendment, that ship sailed a while back.

from this website on the 4th Amendment and monitoring in a public place:
https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/electronic_surveillance

Reasonable Expectation of Privacy

Justice Harlan defines the privacy expectation in his concurrence in Katz, which is referenced in Kyllo, and states that a person must "have exhibited an actual (subjective) expectation of privacy and... that the expectation be one that society is prepared to recognize as 'reasonable.'" Thus, a person has a legitimate expectation of privacy if he honestly and genuinely believes the location under surveillance is private, and if a reasonable person in the same or similar circumstances would believe the location to be private as well. Therefore, the government has more latitude to legally survey communications in a public place than it does in a private place. Further, the courts have allowed the government to record conversations during jail visitations, provided that the surveillance reasonably relates to prison security.


These Antifa types are not too smart. "I'll wear a mask and bring my iPhone so I can take pictures, text and communicate, and even live stream!" Yeah, OK. Congratulations for putting a big, broadcasting beacon on your head...
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top