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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ok, I've been pondering this so bear with me.

Not new to reloading ... 5283 rounds on RCBS JR2 (my first press, still use it for load workups), 852 on RCBS piggyback (bought used, that was stupid but sold for more than paid after bit of refurb - wonder how many have even heard of it), 575 on lee loadall (12 ga, sort of silly, no savings and slowwww) 27781 on Hornady LNL (thought it was fine until bought 650, now use it for large primers only - 45, 41mag, 44sp&mag), 27412 on Dillon 650 (almost all 40 cal, bought it when up'd my qty for uspsa, dedicated to small primers - 40 and 9). Yea, I keep a log in MS Excel, anal that way.

Anyhow, not new but new to rifle. Don't shoot enough 30-30 to even consider. Had considered 223 but decided not worth buying gear to save only a bit. But that has changed with ammo prices. Today drove down to Duncan OK for 71st Anniversary at Murf's Guns (great shop, my favorite - anywhere, anytime). They actually had small rifle primers, powder and 55 grain bullets - all at decent prices (decent in current climate). So decided to take the plunge. Decided will start on single stage as I have for all other calibers. See how it goes, then perhaps move up to buy shell plate etc. So also grabbed a rcbs shell holder. Hornady dies coming from amazon.

So if you've stuck with me, all that brings me to my question. Case trimming. Almost everything I've read says trim after resize ... makes sense to me considering how case gets longer. But if do that must split progressive into two batches. So for me, not big quantities, why bother? Why not just stay on single stage?

Thanks if you've made it through that.
 

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For ultimate accuracy check/trim at every loading. For general/range use just measure case length after sizing and keep within specs.

Work up the loads on a single stage press. Keep good records. Determine how many firings before the case stretches too much. If you aren't pushing the limits you may get several loadings before noticing enough case stretch to matter. Keep the fired cases segregated and run them in batches thru the progressive. Maybe that all makes sense to you. It sounds like extra work but actually does save time if you are loading enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for replies

@Decent_Shot ... no strong preference for hornady. Was able to cancel order. Link below for x die set does not say if the seater die has taper crimp. Do you know? Is that a good set?

I got 500 Lightning ammo bullets for $55 at store today. My AR has produced lots of once fired brass ;)

 

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Discussion Starter #4

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I have not moved to rifle rounds yet only pistol so trimming (so far) has not been required and I am on n RCBS rock crusher single stage.

I plan to continue with it when I do move to long gun stuff as I am not in a race and doing small batches I prefer knowing each step is done and done properly.




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I have NEVER seen a reason for progressive loading of rifle cartridges. 1) Size/deprime/expand, 2) prime, 3) remove case from shell holder and charge with powder (look in case for powder height) using either my Lee PPM or my RCBS ChargeMaster, 4) Immediately seat bullet. You can do the steps in bulk or you can get a Lee turret with auto-indexing. I like my Co-Ax too much for any turret.
So, I remove the case after sizing and measure and trim. Trimming is on a NEED only due to exceeding max length.
You can trim before sizing. You can use a press-mounted powder measure. You CAN, but are you going to shoot so much that you NEED a progressive?
I've been using a progressive since the first Hornady progressive came out and STILL don't see a reason to not single-stage the few rifle rounds I load.
 
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