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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Another accidental discharge causing a brand-spanking-new hole in someone's leg.

I didn't know the guy, and he appeared to be OK when they carted him off to the hospital.

It was during a stage which required you to turn 180 degrees around (bad guys were behind you in line), and engage targets. Actually 2 strings of fire here, as you did it again turning the other way around.

I didn't see it first hand, but I was told that he started drawing while turning around and pulled the trigger during the draw.

We shot 4 (out of 8 total) stages before getting stopped for the day.

This is the second leg-shooting self-injury to occur at that club. I certainly don't blame the club or it's officers, however I think very large turn-outs and a therefore slightly 'rushed' feeling might be a contributor.
 

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I was on the squad which the discharge took place. The facts are this: shooter had completed the first string of fire. Shooter had started the second string, completed the 180 and was drawing his gun from the holster when the discharge occurred. The gun was a Springfield 1911, holster was a Serpa. When gun was later examined, the safety was ON. No one is sure if shooter thumbed it back on after it discharged, if safety failed or if safety was thumbed on by another person. Shooter is very experienced.

An EMT and a Suregon were shooting one bay over and administered quick medical attention. The clubs action plan worked as designed. His wound is not life threatening but serious according to medical personal on the scene. Thoughts and prayers for his successful recovery are welcomed.
 

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Ouch! hope he recovers quickly and gets back to competition.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I was on the squad which the discharge took place. The facts are this: shooter had completed the first string of fire. Shooter had started the second string, completed the 180 and was drawing his gun from the holster when the discharge occurred. The gun was a Springfield 1911, holster was a Serpa. When gun was later examined, the safety was ON. No one is sure if shooter thumbed it back on after it discharged, if safety failed or if safety was thumbed on by another person. Shooter is very experienced.

An EMT and a Suregon were shooting one bay over and administered quick medical attention. The clubs action plan worked as designed. His wound is not life threatening but serious according to medical personal on the scene. Thoughts and prayers for his successful recovery are welcomed.
That sucks. I hope he heals up quickly! Like I said before, I don't blame the club, they've always been great with safety.
 

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That sucks. I hope he heals up quickly! Like I said before, I don't blame the club, they've always been great with safety.
Roger that. I am glad you brought the incident up. Hopefully it can be used as a reminder to each of us when ever we handle firearms. We can never be to safe.

There are alot of new shooters that come here for advice and to share their excitement. Being safe when handeling any gun, wheather in a competition or just cleaning can not be overstated enough.

The other take away from this, should be that just because a gun has an external safety does not make it any safer than a gun that dosen't. In fact one of the Deputies that responded to the club, was trashing 1911's in general because of thier design and called them unsafe. The best safety on a gun is the engaged brain of the shooter.
 

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The BEST safety is no finger on trigger until sights are on the target. PERIOD. SO needs to be aware of that at all times.
If the shooter comes close to violating that, stop the shooter immediately or bring to their attention at the end of the string.
NOT an accidental, negligent. IMHO
 

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The BEST safety is no finger on trigger until sights are on the target. PERIOD. SO needs to be aware of that at all times.
If the shooter comes close to violating that, stop the shooter immediately or bring to their attention at the end of the string.
NOT an accidental, negligent. IMHO
With all due respect, Im not sure your familiar with the Serpa. A shooter can unintentionally curl there finger into the trigger gaurd and discarge the gun on the draw due to the release button. A range officer could never be quick enough to prevent that process once it begins. This was , according to some witnesses, an experienced shooter(heresay).I was 2 bays away and spoke with a physician who helped the shooter prior to the arrival of the first responders. Negligent? yes but still an accident. Just one more reason not to run a Serpa, especially in a competition environment.
 

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Another accidental discharge causing a brand-spanking-new hole in someone's leg.

I didn't know the guy, and he appeared to be OK when they carted him off to the hospital.

It was during a stage which required you to turn 180 degrees around (bad guys were behind you in line), and engage targets. Actually 2 strings of fire here, as you did it again turning the other way around.

I didn't see it first hand, but I was told that he started drawing while turning around and pulled the trigger during the draw.

We shot 4 (out of 8 total) stages before getting stopped for the day.

This is the second leg-shooting self-injury to occur at that club. I certainly don't blame the club or it's officers, however I think very large turn-outs and a therefore slightly 'rushed' feeling might be a contributor.
Well, in a 180deg engagement, I start my draw prior to turning as well. That wasn't his problem, his problem was breaking a finite safety rule; never have your finger on the trigger until ready to shoot. Hopefully he is alright & learned a valuable lesson. BTW, I agree about the Serpa, not a holster for a newb or even exp shooter tht hasn't practiced with it. It is quite easy to get your trigger finger scary close to the trigger during the presentation UNLESS you are hyper aware ofkeeping that finger dead straight.
TO the newb shooters wanting to get into IDPA or other gun games, safety is rule one. Never go faster than YOUR skill level allows. It's easy to get caught up in trring to be like the guy in front of you that just smoked 6 targets w/ a reload in 14sec, but if you can't do that don't try @ a match. It's also important to know your gun & gear. A match is not the place to figure it out.
 
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