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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I havent been hunting since I was about 17, which was 15 years ago... I decided to check up on all the regulations and wasnt surprised to see that rifles (not muzzle loaders) are still not legal to hunt deer with. What did suprise me was that the regulations plainly state there is NO caliber restrictions for some small game like squirrel, which is what I'm planning on hunting. So... what makes it ok to go blast up a squirrel with my Mosin, but not a deer, am I missing something here:confused:
 

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I was always under the assumption that the reason for Ohio's rifle exclusion was the mistaken belief that somehow buckshot or slugs were less likely to carry over long ranges and inflict unintended damage.

If what you say about no caliber restrictions for small game is true, it certainly doesn't make any sense to me, either.

Here in Georgia, the taking of small game with firearms is limited to shotguns, and any .22 caliber or smaller rimfire or muzzleloading firearm.

Same distorted logic applies...a legal muzzleloader in Georgia is .44-cal or larger.

At least we can utilize .22-cal or larger centerfire firearms w/ expanding bullets on deer, and, of course, muzzleloaders as mentioned above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Heres what it says exactly....

Allowable Hunting Equipment

Fox, Raccoon, Skunk, Opossum, Weasel, Squirrel,
Cottontail Rabbit, Ring-necked Pheasant, Ruffed
Grouse, Bobwhite Quail, and Crow

Longbow - includes compound and recurve bows
Crossbow

Handgun – any caliber

Rifle – any caliber

Shotgun – 10 gauge or smaller

Airgun
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was always under the assumption that the reason for Ohio's rifle exclusion was the mistaken belief that somehow buckshot or slugs were less likely to carry over long ranges and inflict unintended damage.

If what you say about no caliber restrictions for small game is true, it certainly doesn't make any sense to me, either.

Here in Georgia, the taking of small game with firearms is limited to shotguns, and any .22 caliber or smaller rimfire or muzzleloading firearm.

Same distorted logic applies...a legal muzzleloader in Georgia is .44-cal or larger.

At least we can utilize .22-cal or larger centerfire firearms w/ expanding bullets on deer, and, of course, muzzleloaders as mentioned above.
Thats the reason I was thinking as to why they dont allow rifles for deer (the long range if you miss) but your way more likely to miss a squirrel or other small animal than a deer... so the only other reason I can think of, seeing as how you can use rifles for small game, is to give the deer more of an advantage by limiting you to short/medium range accuracy weapons.
 

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southern MI has the same types of rules in place. It has nothing to do with safety and more to do with making it harder for hunters. People just assume it is about safety. As a matter of fact, I've read that on average a slug will actually skip a couple of times and remain deadly out to a further distance than most center-fire rifles that break up on contact with the ground and rely on high velocities for killing power. With the explosion in deer populations and the drop off of hunters, I think that those types of policies need to be reviewed.
 

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As a matter of fact, I've read that on average a slug will actually skip a couple of times and remain deadly out to a further distance than most center-fire rifles that break up on contact with the ground and rely on high velocities for killing power. With the explosion in deer populations and the drop off of hunters, I think that those types of policies need to be reviewed.
Oh, skip couple times? Should be careful and by the way i totally agree your view.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
southern MI has the same types of rules in place. It has nothing to do with safety and more to do with making it harder for hunters. People just assume it is about safety. As a matter of fact, I've read that on average a slug will actually skip a couple of times and remain deadly out to a further distance than most center-fire rifles that break up on contact with the ground and rely on high velocities for killing power. With the explosion in deer populations and the drop off of hunters, I think that those types of policies need to be reviewed.
I agree, there is definitely no shortage of deer here in Ohio that validates making it harder to kill one by limiting what weapon you can use... when you see them wandering around suburbs in small herds that should tell you there are plenty to hunt, that and the sheer number of flattened ones you can see on a daily basis if you drive down pretty much any highway, I have hit two myself:-?
 
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